Date

Tue - 21.11.2017


Ownership and Regulations

The Hammersmith and Fulham council, in West London, announced that it would close in April its free newspaper H&F News in response to the rules proposed by Communities and Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles, who in June declared a war to what he calls "town hall Pravdas," MediaGuardian reported today.

The council will maintain an e-mail newsletter to inform citizens about services it provides. However, it also plans to look "for a buyer to take over advertising contracts thought to be worth around £375,000," the Hammersmith and Fulham Chronicle revealed. The council will expect to receive a percentage of the advertising revenues as well as "regular slot" in the publication to include notices and information. "The newspaper we choose to have a contract with will always be 100 per cent independent of us," said a council spokesman.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-08 18:12

UK media regulatory body Ofcom announced it will release its evaluation of the possible total acquisition of broadcasting company BSkyB by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. by Dec. 31, Brand Republic reported today. Additionally, Canadian Business divulged that on Wednesday the European Commission said it is looking into the proposed acquisition and that it will present an anti-trust report on Dec. 8.

"Heaven forfend that we will create a Fox News here in the UK," said British Labor Party Politician Lord Smith of Finsbury, The Telegraph wrote. "We must ensure the plurality of media ownership and therefore of media voice."

Image via Zimbio

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-04 22:39

Businessmen Pierre Bergé, Xavier Niel and Matthieu Pigasse became on Tuesday the new owners of Le Monde, as shareholders endorsed the recapitalisation of the company, CNBC.com reported.

The group, which will invest 110 million euro to pay debts and stem losses, now owns 64.5 percent of the newspaper through a holding company called Le Monde Libre. However, their stake will decrease to 60 percent "once Le Monde staff and readers get control of 33.4 percent" of the daily, CNBC.com pointed out.

Spanish media group Prisa, which owned 15 percent of the French newspaper, is expected to transfer its share to Le Monde Libre. With the recapitalisation, Prisa's stake was diluted to 5 percent. According El Pais, the three businessmen signed a preliminary agreement with the Spanish group allowing it to acquire 20 percent of new holding company.

Meanwhile, the weekly Nouvel Observateur and Italian daily La Stampa announced they would sell their holdings in Le Monde. Similarly, French media group Lagardère, which owned 17 percent of the newspaper, sold its shares to the business trio, ABC.es reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-04 22:03

The Washington Times was sold yesterday for just US$1 to a group led by the Rev. Sun Myung Moon, leader of the Unification Church and founder of the newspaper, The Associated Press revealed.

The new owners agreed to assume the newspaper's debt and restore the sports section, which was eliminated earlier this year to cut costs, The Washington Post noted. According to an article published in the Washington Times, the organisation "will likely expand into radio and will broaden its presence on the Web."

After being run since 2006 by Moon's oldest son, Preston Moon, the newspaper will be overseen by a five-member board, which includes former president and publisher Thomas McDevitt, chairman Douglas M. Joo and finance chief Keith Cooperrider, Bloomberg explained. All three of them had been fired by the previous owner.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-03 17:30

Newspapers are generally regarded for their roles in societies as giving citizens a tool to better monitor their governments and other officials, and pushing for progress and promoting free speech. One newspaper in Uganda, operating on the opposite end of the spectrum, has been ordered to stop publishing the names of citizens it says are gay, according to a Reuters report, posted yesterday by the Irish Times.

The newspaper, called Rolling Stone, last month published the names and photos of citizens it said were homosexual, and called on authorities to put them to death. The headline was called "Men of Shame Part II," and followed the publication last month of 100 other people it alleged were gay.

Image: AP, via the Guardian

The Sexual Minorities Uganda group petitioned the country's high court to close the publication, as it was opening up innocent people to discrimination at the least, and violence at the worst, Frank Mugisha, chairman of the group, told Reuters.

Under Ugandan law, homosexuality is outlawed. Several people in the list published by Rolling Stone experienced harassment, according to the Guardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 16:32

HTML 5, the latest version of code used to create websites, is expected to further erode users' privacy, by letting sites know where users are physically located, as well as better track browsing histories. Consumer activists and privacy advocates are certain to be against these privacy threats, but those in the journalism world may find it to be their "salvation," writes The New York Times's Robert Wright.

"The willingness of advertisers to spend the money that sustains journalists has always depended on having information about the reader," he stated. And, as online players get bigger, the power they wield increases as they obtain more user data. Wright points to Google, Yahoo and Facebook as the top examples of firms obtaining more and more user information.

Image: WSJ. Click here for the interactive version.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-20 18:00

The New York Times has filed a trademark suit against Kachingle after the micropayment service included several of the newspaper's blogs without its permission, paidContent.org revealed yesterday.

"The suit notes that Kachingle has attempted to market its services to consumers, based on the expectation that the NYTimes.com will start charging readers for access next year," explained paidContent.org. However, the company sued for the unauthorised usage of the paper and blogs' logos and names rather than its content.

Since September 2010, Kachingle, which describes itself as "an alternative to a forced, solitary paywall," charges The New York Times' readers a "voluntary contribution of just $5/month" to access the blogs. Under the campaign "Stop the paywall," Kachingle launched a website as an alternative to newspaper's announcement about a proposed paywall for January of 2011.

According to the suit, the micropayment company initially approached the newspaper in 2009 to request access to the blogs in exchange for the fees collected from users without mentioning that it would keep 15 percent of the money. However, the media publisher said it was not interested in the partnership.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-19 18:38

The Center for Public Integrity will absorb the Huffington Post's nonprofit journalism arm, the Huffington Post Investigative Fund, it was reported in the New York Times. The merger would bring the number of people who work at the center to 50 employees, turning it into one of the largest nonprofit investigative newsrooms in the United States.

Arianna Huffington, founder and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post, said opportunity to merge was welcome as there is a great need for investigative reporting and there are a number of stories that have not been told. The Huffington Post is going to transfer $2 million in grants and financing from a fund to support the merge.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-19 16:35

A Facebook news app for users might come about in the near future, but news publishers should be wary of its appearance, believes NewsCloud's Jeff Reifman. He writes on his NewsCloud Blog that as Facebook already lets users share photos, e-mails, events and groups, it seems that "a built-in news application is inevitable." An application like this would help Facebook "take on Google News" and broaden its content. However, Reifman believes a news app for Facebook apparently would not be good for media companies. (It must be noted that Reifman's NewsCloud offers a Facebook application for news organisations and therefore he has a specific interest in this topic.)

For some time, publishers have lost (and gained) page views because readers are finding news from Google News, Twitter and Facebook. "Currently, news bubbles into your Facebook feed in a distributed fashion based on Facebook pages you've joined," states Reifman. Publishers also use Facebook pages "despite concerns about end user privacy, data collection and revenue" and they cannot personalize stories to certain readers through Facebook. However, a Facebook news app could change the way news is delivered to Facebook users.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-18 15:20

According to journalism.co.uk, the African online news company A24 has just partnered with the African Press Organization (APO). "The deal will see A24 host the APO's wire service, which includes multilingual reports and press releases from governments, political organisations and NGOs," states the article. The agency also provides a free wire service to African journalists.

A24 launched at the end of 2008 and was said to be Africa's first online site for African content while trying to strengthen Africa's media capacity, states newsfromafrica.org. The site sells African video content to different news companies across the world, "with contributors receiving the bulk of the sales revenue and retaining copyright," reports the journalism.co.uk article. Plus, the editorial board includes Reuters' head of global multimedia along with a former executive director at ABC News based in Australia.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-15 20:08

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