Date

Tue - 21.11.2017


Ownership and Regulations

A bill that would create harsher punishments for those who attack journalists has been submitted to the lower house of the country's parliament, Russian news agency RIA Novosti reported. However, the legislation is "not enough," said lawmaker Irina Yarovaya.

Earlier this month, two journalists were violently attacked in Moscow. Oleg Kashin was beaten outside of his home and had to be put into an induced coma, and Anatoly Adamchuk was attacked two days later, according to Journalism.co.uk.

Photo via RIA Novosti: Oleg Kashin, a reporter for Kommersant, was beaten outside his home earlier this month.
Russia has one of the worst safety records for journalists in the world, ranked fifth, behind Iraq, the Philippines, Colombia and Mexico, according tot he International Press Institute. At least 35 journalists were murdered in Russia between 2000 and 2009, RIA Novosti noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-30 16:57

Just as News Corp announced it would block Google from indexing its content last year, so, too has U.S. television entertainment company Viacom.

Earlier this year Viacom also took its content out of Hulu.com, a site where television programmes can be watched online, because the two could not agree on payment. In response to the situation with Google TV, Viacom told paidContent in a statement: "We're blocking access to our full episode content from Google TV's Web browser. We continue to evaluate Google TV to identify opportunities where it may make sense to optimize our Web content for the platform."

U.S. television networks NBC and CBS, ABC and Fox have also treated Google TV as a new form of distribution and are working on blocking their programming from the platform, AdWeek noted. This is likely because the networks don't want to damage relationships with cable and affiliate partners.

"The ecosystem in TV pays for the content," one media executive told MediaWeek earlier this month. "I'm not sure Google gets that. They are approaching this as if it's an academic MBA project."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-24 16:16

A great debate over media concentration has been taking place in the UK as News Corp bids to buy BSkyB, whose properties include 24-hour news channel Sky News. News Corp already owns 39% of BSkyB, more commonly referred to as Sky, and there has been much opposition to allowing the purchase of the remainder of the company.

News Corp, via its subsidiary News International, owns The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and The News of the World, which account for about 37% of the national newspaper market. Sky is the UK's largest pay TV platform, reaching one third of all homes. As well as news, it focuses on sports, films and entertainment. It also has a significant radio news presence. Combined, News Corp and BSkyB would have a turnover of £7.5bn, compared to the BBC's £4.8bn.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-23 16:17

Social networking sites such as Facebook fragment the Web, and "have begun to chip away at its principles," said Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, the Guardian reported today. Although the networks are some of the Web's "most successful inhabitants," erode its basic principles by creating a "closed silo of content," he said.

"The more you enter, the more you become locked in. Your social networking site becomes a central platform - a closed silo of content, and one that does not give you full control over your information in it," he wrote in an article titled "Long Live the Web: A Call for Continued Open Standards and Neutrality," for the Scientific American. "The more this kind of architecture gains widespread use, the more the Web becomes fragmented, and the less we enjoy a single, universal information space."

Photo: Telegraph.co.uk
Berners-Lee also argued that companies selling Internet connectivity are another a threat, giving the example of cable television companies that are considering limiting users to their entertainment packages.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-22 19:05

In a joint announcement today, Facebook and MySpace announced they are coordinating efforts, and the News Corp.-owned MySpace is adding more features from Facebook Inc., Bloomberg reported.

Users will now be able to coordinate their accounts using a "Mash Up with Facebook" service that allows MySpace to use information, such as entertainment preferences, from its users' Facebook accounts, PCWorld explained. MySpace will then be able to better offer more targeted content and also suggest related content the user might like.

Image: MySpace is increasingly focusing on social entertainment

The companies have said there are no financial terms of the agreement, but MySpace will benefit by using information supplied by Facebook. To return the favour, MySpace will soon add Facebook "Like" buttons across its site, and when a user clicks on one, the data will go back to Facebook's treasure trove of user data, according to PCWorld.

"MySpace has already acknowledged Facebook as the winner in the battle for social networking supremacy and has been redesigning itself as a social entertainment destination targeted at a younger Gen Y audience," SeattlePI.com Blogs writer Benny Evangelista pointed out.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-18 23:27

Investment fund manager Invesco has sold its 14 percent stake in European newspaper group Mecom, MediaGuardian reported today. Invesco sold its stake to several "blue chip institutions," the report stated.

In September, the firm supported a maneuver by shareholders Aviva and Legal & General to try and replace Mecom CEO David Montgomery with Patrick Tillieux, a former senior executive at broadcasters SBS and ProSiebenSat.1, and to also refocus on its flagship operation in the Netherlands. The gap left by Investco, formerly the second-largest shareholder, may give Montgomery a way to stay at the company in a different role, MediaGuardian explained.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-17 16:51

Tribune Co. Chairman Sam Zell announced yesterday he will leave the company after it exits bankruptcy proceedings - the largest bankruptcy in the history of American media.

"I think when we're done with the bankruptcy process I will turn it over to whoever the creditors decide they want to run it, and wish them a lot of good luck," Zell told CNBC in an interview. He has even admitted that the situation at the Tribune is a "deal from hell;" however, he insists the company now is in "dramatically better shape" than when he took it private in 2007, and has a healthy cash flow for the next 12 months.

Image: Gawker

Last month the company began moving closer to exiting bankruptcy, as it filed a reorganisation plan backed by its leading creditors, including Goldman Sachs Loan Partners, Oaktree Capital Management and Marathon Asset Management.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-16 22:38

Online content delivery network Akamai Technologies - the biggest in terms of market share - has filed a lawsuit against competitor, start-up Cotendo Inc., paidContent reported today. Massachusetts-based Akamai claims that Cotendo, which provides website acceleration and online content delivery services, is infringing on three of its patents, but Cotendo has said it will fight the allegations in court.

The California-based Cotendo said the lawsuit, filed by Akamai and MIT, has no merit and that it will "defend the suit vigorously," the Boston Globe reported. In the suit, the plaintiffs are asking the U.S. district court for an injunction to stop Cotendo from using "methods covered by the patents," the report stated.

"When competing companies use patents to battle each other, the most common pattern is small or defunct companies suing market leaders, looking to cash in their patents. But 'predatory' patent lawsuits such as Akamai's, brought by dominant players against smaller competitors, do happen as well," paidContent's Joe Mullin explained.

Akamai has a market cap of US$9.5 billion, according to an article by Israeli business news site Globes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-12 20:07

U.S. magazine Newsweek announced it will merge its website with that of news and commentary site The Daily Beast to form The Newsweek Daily Beast Co., AFP reported today. Both parties will have an equal stake in the newly established joint venture.

"In an admittedly challenging time, this merger provides the ideal combination of established journalism authority and bright, bristling website savvy," Sidney Harman, Newsweek's owner, said in a statement. The entity will be owned equally by Harman and Barry Diller's Internet company InterActiveCorp, which owns The Daily Beast. Directors will include Harman, as executive chairman, and Diller, as well as one director each to be appointed from either side, according to the press release.

Image: Digital Trends

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-12 17:22

The Guardian Media Group is planning to separate its newspapers, The Guardian and The Observer, and their websites from the rest of the group's multi-media assets, according to a report drawn by MediaGuardian from the Sunday Times print edition.

The move will be led by CEO Andrew Miller, who joined GMG in July, and it is expected to "draw a line under ambitions to be a multi-media group" by treating assets outside the Guardian News and Media national press division as "arms-length investments", according to a report by PressGazette.co.uk. This means that the group's management and operational focus will be on Guardian News Media.

The company's multi-media assets include its holdings in Trader Media Group and the b2b magazine publisher Emap, both jointly owned with private equity firm, Apax, radio stations and property websites.

Also likely consideration of sale or stock market listing of the lucrative Trader division and its principal brand, Auto Trader magazine, estimated at a value of £1.5bn "is likely to fuel speculation over the financial future of Guardian Media Group," according to nma.co.uk. The media group also recently announced the switch in payment model of its iPhone app from a one-off charge to a subscription model.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-09 18:51

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