Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Newsrooms and Journalism

Sympathy mingled with ire on Twitter yesterday as Canadians reacted to a fresh set of cuts announced by Postmedia Network, the country’s largest newspaper chain.

In a memo from CEO Paul Godfrey to employees released Monday afternoon, the company declared plans to shut down the Sunday editions of three urban dailies — the Ottawa Citizen, the Edmonton Journal and the Calgary Herald — to stop printing its country-wide title, the National Post, on Mondays for the fourth summer in a row (a tactic that Godfrey hinted in an interview with rival national daily The Globe and Mail might be extended throughout the year) and to cease publication on public holidays.

Journalists across the country are grimly waiting to be hit by a renewed surge of layoffs, coming less than a month after the company slashed 25 of 58 posts in its Postmedia News division. “Some roles across our operations will be eliminated,” confirmed Monday’s memo. The Globe and Mail reported that internal memos from the company's Ottawa and Montreal newsrooms indicated that each would lose approximately around 20% of their journalists, but that the total number was yet unknown.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-29 16:48

New Orleans is about to become the most prominent American city without a daily printed newspaper.

This fall, the Times-Picayune, a 175-year-old New Orleans institution known for its Pulitzer-decorated coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, will begin printing its paper edition only three times a week, on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays.

The plan, which is to be accompanied by staff cuts and a stronger emphasis on online coverage, was announced yesterday by Advance Publications, the company behind the Times-Picayune, which is owned by the Newhouse family. Reasons for the restructuring include “tremendous challenges in terms of both revenue and the 24-hour news cycle,” Steven Newhouse, Chairman of advance.net, Advance Publication’s digital arm, told The New York Times.

The Newhouse family's is the last major newspaper company to have kept its digital business separate from its print business, noted news industry analyst Ken Doctor on Newsonomics. As part of the planned online expansion, the Times-Picayune and NOLA.com, its website, will be remodeled into a new company, the NOLA Media Group.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-25 17:10

The Big Issue, a magazine founded to help the homeless, publishes its 1,000th issue today, reports Journalism.co.uk. The article quotes John Bird, one of the publication’s founders, who says that this milestone makes him feel “a mix of joy and discomfort, largely because we've achieved a lot, but we've still got more work to do."

Poynter provides some handy tips about using audio more effectively in multimedia stories. Among other things, the article advises journalists to use sound to provide extra detail for stories, and suggests that they use layers of audio to create a richer listening experience.

Nieman Lab’s Adrienne LaFrance compares the video games industry and the journalism industry – and looks at how the growth of the internet has disrupted both. LaFrance argues that he way that the games industry has adapted to the change has a lot to teach publishers.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-14 17:23

Defamation reform was included in the Queen’s Speech to the British parliament today, Press Gazette reported, a move which the Libel Reform Campaign said would “open the way to ending libel tourism” and protect free expression. England has notoriously tight libel laws and the Libel Reform Campaign, which includes Index on Censorship, has been campaigning for reform since November 2009.

Kenya is “riding a social media wave,” reports Al Jazeera, and even outside cities, Twitter is being used by police to alert townspeople about goings-on.

10000 words blogger Elana Zak takes a look at how The Wall Street Journal is using Facebook to cover Facebook. The newspaper is making use of Facebook’s Timeline tool to cover the social networking giant’s IPO with a dedicated Facebook page.

China has expelled Al Jazeera English correspondent Melissa Chan from the country, forcing the news organisation’s bureau to close. The Arabic service will remain, however, noted Poynter.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-05-09 16:41

“Three-quarters of the world’s top 100 largest newspapers are published in Asia,” said Jacob Mathew, President of the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers, at WAN-IFRA’s Publish Asia conference, held earlier this month in Bali. “Print circulations are growing, a fact that is not easily explained away by those who insist on predicting the death of newspapers. Millions of Asians turn to their daily paper as their primary trusted source of news and information.”

Mathew, who is also the executive editor and publisher of the Malayala Manorama Group in India, was just one of the speakers at WAN-IFRA’s 12th annual Asia conference to address the question of why Asian newspapers are continuing to grow, even as print declines in other regions.

Participants, including Chua Wee Phong, Executive Vice President of Circulation for Singapore Press Holdings, Jack Matthew, CEO of Fairfax Metro Media in Australia and Azrul Ananda, Director of Jawa Pos in Indonesia, focused on a number of factors, including the success of many Asian companies in protecting print revenues and then reinvesting the funds in digital expansion.

A full summary of the conference is available to WAN-IFRA members here.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-24 13:55

The Guardian announced today on its Developer Blog that the paper is launching the Miso Project, an open source toolkit which will help make the creation of infographics and interactive content a lot easier and faster. The first part of the project is the release of Dataset, a Javascript library.

TechDirt reported that search engine Meltwater attacked the Associated Press' lawsuit against its tracking news service as a "misuse" of copyright law. Read the rest of Meltwater's statement here.

Patrick B. Pexton of The Washington Post highlights the dangers of blogging and aggregation by examining Elizabeth Flock's blog errors and ultimate resignation, suggesting that the Post itself gave her little guidance and failed in its obligation to train her. Flock resigned after publishing a story about Mars life without citing the publisher of the original article, Discovery News, as a source.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-23 16:39

Chicago Tribune reporter Rex W. Huppke wrote a satirical obituary for facts (cause of death: Rep. Allen West's assertion that 81 Democrats in the US House of Representatives are Communists). Read the story behind the op-ed piece Facts, 360 B.C.- A.D. 2012 on Jim Romenesko's blog.

Bobbie Johnson from GigaOm takes a look at Norwegian tabloid Dagbladet's online video player that "collects seven different video feeds and allows website visitors to easily flip between coverage from inside the courtroom, the courthouse, background interviews and commentary on the street or from pundits in the newspaper’s own studio."

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-20 17:24

The Guardian reports that former Sunday Express editor Sue Douglas and ITV executive Rupert Howell plan to launch a new Sunday tabloid that would be a "reincarnation of the News of the World." They are reportedly in talks with investors.

Blottr, a hyperlocal citizen journalist platform, has just launched a Facebook app which will allow them to more easily share news, according to The Next Web. Users will also be able to add new content to Blottr from Facebook, the article said.

The phone-hacking scandal hits the States: The Daily Beast reports that lawyer Mark Lewis, who filed lawsuits on behalf of UK hacking victims in the News of the World scandal, plans to sue Rupert Murdoch's News Corp in the name of three clients who claim to have been hacked in the US, one of whom is a US citizen.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-12 15:44

A small spat has arisen involving the Newspaper Guild of New York, Reuters and TheBaron.info, an independent website aimed at Reuters’ past and present employees, which raises interesting questions about Reuters’ editorial direction.

On February 23, The Baron posted an article stating that Reuters’ editor-in-chief Stephen Adler, deputy-editor-in-chief Paul Ingrassia and COO Stuart Karle told staff in a meeting that “Reuters is adopting a new editorial approach aimed at winning Pulitzer Prizes: long, in-depth, investigative special reports from all bureaux.”

The Guild reported at the beginning of last month on The Baron’s original post, which reads, “asked about the business case for such a radical switch in journalistic priorities, the editorial chiefs said the chairman and majority owner David Thomson wants Pulitzers, and this is the only way Thomson Reuters can get them. He is a very rich man – the world’s 17th wealthiest billionaire according to the most recent Forbes magazine reckoning – and that is what he wants, chief correspondents were told.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-05 16:01

Two Brazilian journalists, the owner of Costa Oeste newspaper Onei de Moura and radio reporter Divino Aparecido Carvalho, were shot and killed last weekend near the Paraguay border, The Guardian reports.

After having been purchased by Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, The New Republic announced on its blog that new articles on the website will no longer be blocked by its paywall, according to the Atlantic Wire.

Steve Buttry of The Buttry Diary blog asked several engagement editors, or social media editors, to explain their roles in the newsroom and how they try reach their audiences. Read their responses here

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-28 17:36

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