Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Newsrooms and Journalism

"Make awesome stuff now. Don’t wait your turn," and other practical advice for recent journalism school graduates from Ann Friedman, the former editor of GOODMagazine, via Nieman Lab.

Armando Montano, a 22 year-old summer intern at AP in Mexico City, was discovered dead in an apartment building's elevator shaft on Saturday. The Washington Post reports.

The Guardian reports that the number of warnings over press behaviour issued by the Press Complaints Committee has increased, despite a dip attributed to the launch of the Leveson inquiry. Although some complaints were made by celebrities fearing press-intrusion, the majority were lodged by members of the public, “many of whom were grieving because of the death or illness of a child, partner or parent, or the aftermath of an affair.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-02 17:34

The debate over outsourced journalism has been reignited by the revelation that Journatic, a company that produces local media content for publications including Newsday and the Chicago Tribune, has been providing its clients with articles written by workers in the Philippines. 

Ryan Smith, a Chicago-based freelance journalist, began to work as a copy-editor for the organisation in January of last year. He became concerned by the quality of the work being produced for Journatic’s clients after noticing that much of what he was editing contained basic spelling and grammar mistakes. When he informed a senior editor of his misgivings, Smith was told to “cut [the writers] some slack” as they were not native English-speakers. By checking the by-lines of several of the articles he edited, Smith discovered that their authors did not actually exist. Instead, Journatic’s offshore freelancers from Brazil, the Philippines, Africa and Eastern Europe were given a selection of aliases to choose from. This meant that readers located in a small US suburb would have no idea that the local news article they were reading was actually written by someone thousands of miles away. The company also uses writers based in the US, but they too are complete strangers to the local communities that they report on.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-02 16:14

A long-form piece for the weekend: Tim de Lisle of Intelligent Life follows the "triumphs and tribulations" of the Guardian, and talks to its piano-playing Editor-in-Chief, Alan Rusbridger, in an attempt to answer its provocative headline: Can the Guardian Survive?

“Yesterday’s News Corp split announcement could spell big changes at The Times as Rupert Murdoch vowed losses would not be tolerated at any of the company’s print titles,” begins an article by Andrew Pugh on PressGazette. Murdoch reportedly said yesterday that he plans to be more "bullish" in the US than in the UK, and that “each newspaper will be expected to pay its way.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-29 15:12

With advances in technology come new challenges for keeping journalistic sources safe.  MediaShift offers a list of tools from Jillian C. York.

Has the legacy of Jayson Blair been forgotten already? An intern at The Wall Street Journal has been fired for fabricating sources. Andrew Beaujon reports for Poynter.

“New media companies that will succeed are founded by two kinds of people: technologists, and media people who think like technologists,” argues Christopher Mims for MIT’s Technology Review.

The BBC will soon redefine the scope of BBC Worldwide, its international commercial arm, due to growing internal friction surrounding online strategy, paidContent reports.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-27 16:08

The Chicago Tribune has become one of the latest major newspapers in the US to announce plans to introduce a paywall on its online site, behind which it will place “premium” content including in-depth reports and analysis, columnists and reviews.

At first glance, this may seem little different to action taken by various other news titles that have sought to maintain or increase revenue at a time when print subscriptions are diminishing. However, the Chicago Tribune is attempting to breathe new life into the process by offering its readers the opportunity to read selected articles from Forbes and The Economist as part of its new premium package. The announcement of a partnership between these three titles certainly seems to prove that Bill Adee (vice president for digital development and operations at the Chicago Tribune) and his team understand the need to offer something more than access to their usual articles and reviews in order to justify charging readers for content that was previously free to view online.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-27 16:07

RealWire has launched a new tool for "curating the media on Twitter." Lissted, which allows you to search for journalists and bloggers and monitor the media on Twitter, already has a database of over 10,000 journalists, and media professionals can request to be listed by filling out a form and linking their Twitter accounts. The Next Web reports.

A Dutch start-up is developing a Farmville-like Facebook game, NewsGame, that will generate original reporting (and pay for it), reports the Nieman Lab.

The late New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid’s death raises questions of how to keep journalists safe in war zones. Steve Myers from Poynter reports.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-26 17:48

The news that The New York Times will soon be publishing its entire content on Flipboard seems to signal a decisive change in the way in which traditional press and media companies engage with their audiences. From this Thursday, the entire content of the NYT will be available to subscribers, whilst non-subscribers will be able to read a limited amount of articles found in the paper’s Top News section.

The partnership with Flipboard is quite a departure from the Times's previous stance on its digital content. In the past it was necessary to have a subscription to see more than 10 NYT articles, and its digital version could only be viewed via the paper’s apps and website or by reading excerpts quoted by third parties. Explaining why a company that had previously guarded its digital content so jealously has made such a bold move, Denise F. Warren, general manager of The New York Times’s website points out that in a survey of the paper’s subscribers 20 percent of those asked used third-party aggregation apps like Flipboard. The deal still leaves the paywall system in place, but leading figures at the paper hope that allowing partial access to certain articles will encourage many who have not subscribed already to do so.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 17:27

Early on Tuesday morning rumours began to circulate of a possible restructuring within Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, which would see the company separate its entertainment businesses from its smaller section of publishing titles. The rumours are generally seen as credible, having been first published in the News Corp-owned Wall Street Journal. Though the company’s representatives are so far refusing to confirm or deny reports outright, BBC Business editor Robert Preston has been told by a News Corps insider that the company has “nothing to add to [the] WSJ piece”.

The idea of dividing News Corp into two separate organisations is not a new one, having first been suggested several years ago, but until now Murdoch had always rejected such a move. The media mogul seems to have a sentimental attachment to newspapers, that until the 1980s were the nucleus of News Corporation. However, the recent scandals that have engulfed Murdoch-owned titles such as the former News of the World have led shareholders to see splitting the company as an ideal way to protect the company’s film and television interests, including the Fox Broadcasting Network and British Sky Broadcasting, from the problems besieging the company’s UK newspaper titles.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 14:13

Clay Shirky for Nieman Lab on Gawker's method of managing comments to make sure the best ones rise to the surface.

The evolution of WordPress from a simple blogging platform and open source project to a content management system, and finally to a Paas (Platform as a Service), according to Adii Pienaar, the CEO and co-founder of WooThemes, one of the largest theme and infrastructure providers for WordPress sites, for GigaOM.

The Independent’s publisher is considering locating all of its titles (the Independent, i, the Independent on Sunday and the Evening Standard) on a single floor in its current base in London’s Kensignton, which is already “bulging at the seams,” and encouraging journalists to work from home, as radical cost-cutting measures. Roy Greenslade reports for the Guardian.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-25 17:51

In the wake of the events that lead to the on-going Leveson inquiry into press practices, one news organisation is attempting to prove that investigative journalism can be both ethical and capable of generating a profit. Conceived by Mark Watts, current Editor-in-Chief, PR executive Tim Pendry and media finance specialist David Baxter, Exaronews.com is a subscription-based site that aims to eschew the “churnalism” that it claims dominates mainstream media outlets in favour of the rigorous investigative practices used by journalists of old. In the relatively short amount of time that has passed since the site’s launch in October 2011, Exaro has uncovered numerous scandals, including the widespread tax avoidance practiced by civil servants, which have subsequently been picked up by larger titles, including the Sunday Times and the Daily Mail.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-25 17:10

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