Date

Sun - 24.09.2017


Newsrooms and Journalism

Next Issue has come to the king of touch screens, and the excitement is palpable. Time is calling the magazine bundling app the Hulu for magazines, and TechCrunchhas tentatively likened it to Netflix (the American movie-mailing service that has given the DVD a renaissance, for those without zip codes). This joint venture between Condé NastTime IncHearstMeredith and News Corp is “probably the easiest and most economical way for you to read your favourite titles” on your iPad according to Anthony Ha. Is it a good enough deal that consumers will pay for the content? PaidContent takes a look.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-10 16:35

Move over Warren Buffet, there’s a new media mogul in town. Chris Hughes, one of the original founders of Facebook and a pioneer of new media, announced in March that he had bought a majority share in The New Republic and would become editor-in chief with immediate effect.

A bimonthly publication sent to its readers through the post, The New Republic is a publication steeped in history and weighed down by a turbulent recent past. In the space of 5 years the magazine had changed owners four times, and at present its circulation stands at about 40,000 copies, less than a third of what it was 15 years ago. It’s a story familiar to many print publications struggling to answer the challenges thrown down by online news and information sources. What makes the case of Chris Hughes’ involvement in the magazine particularly interesting is that, instead of looking at immediate ways to make money, the 28-year-old businessman has indicated a desire to look to the long-term health of the magazine. Addressing TNR’s readers, Hughes made it clear that, unlike other media outlets, the magazine would not “chase superficial metrics of online virality at the expense of investing in rigorous reporting and analysis of the most important stories of our time.”

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-10 13:39

This week as the Leveson Inquiry enters its final stage, Lord Black, chairman of the Press Standards Board of Finance, rejects statutory involvement in the press in favour of an “independently-led self-regulation.” (The Guardian)

The Italian watchdog Ossigeno per l’Informazione announced that starting this week it will publish a review in English on threats to journalists in Italy. Ossigeno Bad News, as the newsletter will be called, wants to compare Italian problems with similar problems in similar countries that have different press liberties. "The review will try to shed light on the dark forces which lurk behind the scenes of journalism and information: forces which are strongest in advanced countries, where all problems seem solved."

Mediaweek reports that The Sun is not only Britain's most-read paper but also its most 'liked' one. This week it became the country's first newspaper to achieve 1 million Facebook likes.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-09 17:00

The Times-Picayune is changing. And not necessarily for the better.

The New Orleans title finds itself simultaneously cutting jobs and struggling to keep a hold on the talented journalists who contributed so much to the paper’s prestige. Earlier this year editor Jim Amoss revealed that more than 200 employees at The Times-Picayune will lose their jobs at the beginning of October, and in the newsroom alone 84 out of 173 reporters will find themselves unemployed after September 30th. What is more, from the second half of this year the once daily title will now only be printed three times a week. The bulk of the paper’s news content will be carried by the website Nola.com, run by Nola Media Group.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-09 15:50

Weekend video long(ish)-form: 5 essential TED Talks, as selected by the New Yorker.

Worried you might be tweeting into a vacuum? Try tweeting on weekends. But don’t let everybody start doing that, or else it will stop working. The BBC College of Journalism Blog offers pointers for making sure people pay attention to your 140 characters.

Al Jazeera's "The Stream" had its Twitter account hacked by supporters of Bashar al-Assad, according to the Huffington Post

The Israeli journalist who drew on leaked army documents to report the alleged assassination of Palestinian militants was spared jail time in a plea bargain, reports Reuters via the Huffington Post

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

 

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-06 16:57

WikiLeaks announced today that it has started publishing a trove of more than 2.4 million emails from "Syrian political figures, ministries and companies," known as the #SyriaFiles, dated between August 2006 and March 2012. Journalism.co.uk reports. Read more on the Guardian's Middle East liveblog.

A reporter who was fired from the Kansas City Star last July for using material from press releases in his columns argues that this should not be counted as plagiarism. He is suing McClatchy Newspapers for $25,000 plus damages. Andrew Beaujon reports for Poynter.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-05 17:56

Say what you like about Rupert Murdoch (and in the aftermath of the phone-hacking scandal, people often do) there’s no denying that his decisions continue to influence the world of media business. A week after News Corp announced that it is to separate his publishing interests from its other businesses, analysts have begun to question whether other media conglomerates ought to follow suit. Today’s Financial Times reports that questions are being asked as to whether Daily Mail and General Trust (DMGT) would benefit from taking similar action.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-05 17:05

He has yet to take up his new position, but George Entwistle, the soon-to-be Director General of the BBC, already faces calls from the National Union of Journalists to rethink the corporation’s six year licence fee freeze. In 2012, out-going DG Mark Thompson agreed that the licence fee would remain fixed at £145.50 until 2017, which translates to 16% real terms cut. Terms of the agreement saw the BBC agree to fund the World Service and BBC Monitoring, which analyses media coverage from around the world. 

The NUJ publicly criticised Thompson’s handling of the licence fee agreement, writing in an email to its members: “It is our view that the BBC should have fought these plans, and rallied its supporters, rather than accept such a devastating deal which could lead to thousands of job losses and the wholesale closure of services." In the months following the deal, the journalism board responsible for the management of BBC Journalism was dissolved and 650 World Service jobs were axed. In addition, BBC Online suffered a budget decrease of 25%, bringing about the loss of 360 jobs and a reduction in the number of news blogs on the site.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-05 14:02

George Entwistle, currently Director of BBC Vision, was appointed today as the new Director-General of the BBC, reports the BBC. Read Entwistle’s memo to staff.

British Community Secretary Eric Pickles has threatened to outlaw local newspapers operated by local authorities, reports Press Gazette.

Twitter, which released its first transparency report on Monday (accessible via Mashable) faces the same dilemma as The New York Times, argues Mathew Ingram for Gigaom: to what extent should it be a platform, and to what extent a destination?

Ken Doctor writes for Nieman Lab on the “tablet aggregator wars” between Pulse and Flipboard, and "moving beyond Paywalls 1.0 to a more nuanced world of digital circulation.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-04 18:08

According to The Guardian, the MailOnline is planning to extend its global reach, opening offices in Toronto, Delhi and Sydney. At present the Daily Mail’s website has 40 journalists based in the UK, 20 in New York who report on US news, and 10 show biz journalists in Los Angeles.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-03 15:43

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