Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Newsrooms and Journalism

What a difference two weeks make.

Only a fortnight after writer Ryan Smith brought the issue of outsourced journalism to the attention of the wider public, relatively unknown hyperlocal content provider Journatic has been engulfed by a succession of scandals. As we reported at the beginning of July, Smith initially voiced concerns about Journatic’s decision to outsource journalism work to the Philippines, where workers would write news stories which were then published under a false name for the Chicago Tribune Triblocal website.

Following the revelation executives at the Chicago Tribune were quick to denounce the practice, stating that the use of false bylines was “a violation of the Chicago Tribune’s ethics policy. It has never been acceptable and will not be tolerated. We expect Journatic to adhere to this policy.” The paper then launched an investigation in order to determine to what extent Journatic’s unethical methods had infiltrated triblocal.com.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-17 17:18

The Audit Bureau of Circulation (ABC)’s monthly reports on newspaper circulation often mark a time of collective wincing for the industry.

Although the downward trend continues, and ABC reports that the newspaper market has contracted by 7.79%, three titles have managed to achieve significant year-on-year circulation increases for June 2012: out of 29 British papers surveyed by the ABC, only i, The Daily Star Sunday and The Sunday Mirror experienced significant growth.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-16 18:20

Participants in the infamous hacker collective Anonymous have launched Par:AnoIA (Potentially Alarming Research: Anonymous Intelligence Agency), a WikiLeaks-esque site for data dumps, reports Wired's Quinn Norton.

Condé Nast shopping magazine Lucky is set to launch Lucky Community, an entirely user-generated digital section, in August. “Top-down only takes you so far,” explains Editor in Chief Brandon HolleyAdWeek reports.

In case you missed it (or it's still under plastic in your mailbox)... As part of its special report on the news industry last week, the Economist reported on impartiality and the media, and "The Foxification of the news."

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-16 18:00

NBC is now the sole owner of msnbc.com, after completing a deal to buy Microsoft’s shares in the news website on Sunday. Comcast, the company that controls NBC, apparently paid the technology giant $300 million for its 50% stake in msnbc.com, though the exact figure remains unconfirmed. Msnbc.com has swiftly been rebranded as NBCNews.com and users are now redirected to the new site and greeted with a welcome note from Editor-in-Chief Jennifer Sizemore. Rumours that the two companies were planning to part ways surfaced in March of this year, when Adweek reported that NBC was in “in serious negotiations with Microsoft to buy back MSNBC.com”.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-16 15:10

South African Communist Party General Secretary Blade Nzimande is calling for newspapers owned by Irish publisher Independent News and Media to be broken up in a bid to improve media diversity in the country. As the company’s owners prepare to sell the titles there are fears that a single owner would be able to wield a significant amount of political power. (BusinessDay)

David Karp, the 26 year-old Founder of Tumblr, may wear hoodies and sneakers, but his resemblance to the leaders of other large tech companies ends there. He finds "follower" counts and other popularity signals "really gross," and says that competition is "for bankers." His monetization strategy is different, too, and Rob Walker wants to know whether he can embrace ads without selling out.

Is the web driving us mad? A worrying report from the Daily Beast reveals some of the negative effects excessive web use can have on your health. Just in time for the weekend.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-13 17:16

Digg – what is left of it at least – has been acquired by Betaworks, a New York-based tech company that creates and invests in technology services. It is the last in a series of sales that have led to the dismantlement of the social media giant. In May the Washington Post paid $12 million to hire away 15 members of Digg staff (almost half of the overall team), while LinkedIn is believed to have spent around $4 million for Digg patents – including one for the “vote up a story” button that was one of the site’s trademarks.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-13 16:10

Can journalism ever be too balanced? Linda Greenhouse certainly thinks so. In an article for Nieman Reports Greenhouse, a veteran Supreme Court reporter, argues that truth, and not “fairness” ought to be a reporter’s primary goal.

In Norway and Denmark, the healthy circulation levels of local news titles means that it’s not just national papers that are introducing paywalls. According to Journalism.co.uk, publishers are experimenting with a variety of subscription options to capitalise on the important role local news still plays in Scandinavian countries.

Twelve jobs will be lost at Condé Nast Media Group as the publishing company merges print and digital and urges magazine titles to cut their budgets. Amongst those leaving the company are Senior Vice President of Corporate Sales Thomas Hartman and Robert Silverstone, Senior Vice President of Finance. (WWD)

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-12 17:17

It was supposed to herald the start of a digital publishing revolution. Instead Rupert Murdoch’s The Daily, the world’s first digital newspaper designed exclusively for the iPad, is rumoured to be facing closure.

In an article for the New York Observer on the effects of News Corp’s recent cuts, Kat Stoeffel reports on rumours that the digital publication has been put “on watch” and will discover its fate after the US presidential elections on November 6th.

Although as yet unconfirmed, if proven to be true the news is unlikely to come as much of a surprise to those who have been closely following the digital title’s fortunes. The Daily launched on a wave of optimism at the beginning of February last year, introduced by Murdoch himself as the company’s answer to the changing world of journalism: “New times demand new journalism… and a new service edited and designed specifically for new devices. Our challenge is to take the best of traditional journalism…and combine it with the best of contemporary technology.”

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-12 15:54

Against a backdrop of closing newspaper titles, falling circulation and dwindling advertising revenue, Italian newspaper Il Fatto Quotidiano has proven that print can make a profit.

Tired of the lack of media independence in a country where every national newspaper received subsidies from the state, popular journalists Marco Travaglio, Antonio Padellaro and Peter Gomez launched a print newspaper that would be funded solely by subscriptions and advertising. It was a gamble that was to pay off after its very first year. Even before its first edition hit newsstands Il Fatto had raised 3.5 million in advance subscriptions alone, and in the following two years it generated profits of around 6 million euros. In contrast, other, more established national newspapers experienced a downturn in circulation: 2011 saw La Repubblica announce a 4.4% drop in sales, La Stampa 6.3% and L’Unità a significant 18%. Meanwhile, in the same year, Il Fatto reported an 18% rise in the number of copies it sold.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-11 16:59

Scotland Yard officers arrested Tom Savage, deputy news editor of the Daily Star Sunday and Sunday Mirror crime correspondent Justin Penrose this morning on suspicion of alleged payments to public officials, the Guardian reports.

Nature reporter Quirin Schiermeier describes how an eccentric scientist was able to bring him to Britain's High Court for an article he wrote, and what it says about the country's "antiquated" libel law.

Wikipedia blacked out its Russian site yesterday in solidarity with other Internet companies and human rights activists protesting against a proposed web censorship law that critics say could lead to the building of a great firewall in Russia, The New York Times reports.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-11 16:55

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