Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Newsrooms and Journalism

Comments made by Conrad Black, one time head of Hollinger International Inc., on the untapped potential of Canadian news titles have prompted speculation that the former media magnate may be considering a return to the newspaper industry.

During a meeting of the editorial board at Huffington Post Canada, Black remarked that “[t]here is a great premium to be placed on the editorial function and on the goodwill of a famous trademark like a respected newspaper.” He went on to add that he could be interested by a “good title that’s grossly under-priced.” The current state of Canada’s news press could see Black presented with just such a low-cost opportunity in the near future. One of Canada’s largest news companies, Postmedia Network Canada Corp. has been forced to respond to declining ad revenue and debts of $516 million (CAD) with radical efficiency restructuring, involving job cuts and the cancellation of Sunday print editions in certain areas.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-31 16:50

Over the weekend The New York Times former executive editor and current columnist Bill Keller fell victim to an elaborate Internet hoax. An opinion piece titled “WikiLeaks, A Post Postscript,” supposedly a follow-up to an article written by Keller in February of this year, was shared through a Twitter account that appeared to belong to Keller and swiftly re-tweeted by journalists, including The Guardian’s Dan Gilmore and the NYT’s own technology correspondent Nick Bilton. Readers were initially fooled by the visual similarities between the fake article and Keller’s regular column. In addition, the advertisements featured on the page were genuine, and all links connected to nytimes.com. On closer inspection, the lack of The New York Times favicon next to the web page’s URL, and the fact that the domain name differs from that used for real NYT op-ed pieces indicated that the article was a fake.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-30 17:41

Back when WAN-IFRA was still FIEJ (the Fédération Internationale des Editeurs de Journaux et Publications), the organisation’s 1962 News Bulletin carried an article that showed that the vast majority of British newspapers relied on advertising, not reader-generated revenue, to cover production and distribution costs. "Quality" newspapers garnered 73 percent of their income from advertising, as opposed to sales and circulation revenue at weekly titles. It is a trend that dates from well before the 1960s and continues to the present day, in both the UK and the United States.

At least, it was a trend that continued until very recently. Now there are growing signs that the tide is at last turning. This week, the New York Times co., publisher of The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune and The Boston Globe released second quarter figures showing that its titles’ circulation-generated revenue was higher than advertising revenue. Although dwindling income from print and digital advertising (which shrank by 6.6 percent and stands at $220 million) undoubtedly contributed to the shift, the Times’ famous paywall and an increase in price for print subscriptions saw circulation revenue at the NYT company’s news titles rise by 8.3 percent, to $233 million.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-27 16:49

Kickstarter, the crowdfunding platform for creative projects, is fast becoming the go-to site for journalists and publishers searching alternative ways of financing projects. Originally conceived in 2009 as a means of financing new and innovative technology, the site has since branched out to become the biggest crowdfunding site in the world with more than 6300 projects and over $250 million raised in pledges. As news titles continue cutting staffing budgets and editorial budgets, an increasing number of writers and reporters are presenting their ideas directly to the Kickstarter public.

Of course, the use of crowdfunding in journalism is old news by now. Spot.Us has been allowing journalists to appeal to the goodwill and largesse of like-minded people since 2008 and is still going strong with more than 1500 contributors and 110 publishing partners, including The New York Times. Meanwhile Emphas.is continues to provide a platform for photojournalists and is even developing a photography book project for later this year. Neither however has scaled the heights of fame in the same way as Kickstarter.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-27 10:31

Though the temperature is soaring in Paris the sun has set for France-Soir, the embattled title that had been serving the French public since 1944. The Tribunal de commerce de Paris, the city’s commercial court, announced on Tuesday, 23 July that the paper’s assets were to be liquidated, after several buyout attempts failed to fully materialise. France-Soir’s archives, domain name, brand, and production rights will subsequently be auctioned off  and all 49 members of staff, 42 of whom are journalists, now find themselves unemployed.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-26 16:13

It looks like a normal tweet. It can be re-tweeted, replied to and marked as a “favourite” like a normal tweet, but Twitter’s new targeted tweets are not shared in the same way as the standard model, and it’s this feature that seems to be paying dividends for advertisers like The Washington Post.

Only five days ago Twitter officially announced that it would be enhancing its "Promoted Tweets," having already piloted a new scheme with British Airways, Wendys, The Washington Post and Coca-Cola. The changes introduced mean that instead of publishing a tweet to all followers and only being able to make it a promoted tweet afterwards, advertisers can target specific sections of their audiences according to geographical location, or device (desktop/ laptop computer vs. mobile phones, tablets).

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-24 17:32

Germany’s international broadcaster Deutsche Walle (DW) is using mobile phones to extend the reach of its "Learning by Ear" programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa. In a continent where Internet access is limited or non-existent, and many countries experience high levels of adult illiteracy, DW has teamed up with mobile phone operators, like Vodaphone in Tanzania, to bring its news service to a greater number of listeners.

Originally a radio series launched in 2008 and followed up with a podcast in 2010, "Learning by Ear" aims to give young people aged 12-20 an insight into subjects like the economy, health, politics and the environment. Through dramas, feature reports and in-depth news analysis "Learning by Ear" tackles issues pertinent to the continent’s teenagers, such as looking and applying for a job in Africa, HIV and AIDS information and a series on women’s rights.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-23 16:52

The smartphone has become the latest hope for news outlets struggling to fight falling print revenue.

The Star, Malaysia’s most read English daily, recently introduced the iSnap, a feature that brings the “newspaper to life” using augmented reality technology and two major Australian publishers, Fairfax and News Limited have both launched new smartphone enhancements in the past month.

Over at The Star, iSnap sprang from an internal challenge thrown to the New Media Department and to the paper’s technology partner, Knorex Pte Ltd of Singapore. Summoned by the owners to find new ways to enhance the flagship publication, both teams started an intense brainstorming session that eventually triggered the iSnap concept.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-20 16:03

One hundred jobs will be cut at The Guardian and The Observer after their publisher, Guardian Media & News (GNM), reported operating losses of £44.2 million for the financial year 2011/2012. Addressing staff at a briefing on Tuesday morning, Alan Rusbridger, the Editor-in-Chief of the two titles, announced that GNM would be introducing a voluntary redundancy scheme (an agreement with the National Union of Journalists means that at the Guardian titles the forced redundancy of a member would necessitate a strike ballot)

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-18 17:33

Narcissistic linking disorder (NLD): an ailment whereby mainstream news organisations link more frequently to themselves than to anyone else. And on average, they do – a shocking 91 percent of the time – despite their best philosophical intentions, according to a recent study by Mark Coddington at the University of Texas, Austin. On the other side of the navel-gazing spectrum, independent bloggers link to themselves only 18 percent of the time on average. Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon reports.

The Guardian News and Media, parent company of the Guardian and Observernewspapers, is expected to announce job cuts in the near future, following publishing losses of about £45m in the financial year ending in March 2012, the Telegraph andMediaWeek report.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-17 17:20

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