Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Newsrooms and Journalism

When the Editors Weblog first reported on Forbes’s acquisition of True/Slant, an online-only news source that published the work of hundreds of expert contributors, it was rather unclear how the start-up would fare as part of Forbes’s vast media empire. Many saw the sale as a means for Forbes to re-employ True/Slant’s creator Lewis Dvorkin, who resigned as an executive editor at the business publication in 2008. After the sale, Dvorkin rejoined Forbes as chief product officer, charged with increasing audience engagement and re-working Forbes’s titles.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-27 15:24

Fairfax News and Media Company has posted losses of A$2.732 billion for the financial year 2011/12, after writing down its media businesses and plants and equipment (including printing presses in Tullamarine and Chullora that are to be shut down in 2014) by almost A$3 billion. The losses announced on Thursday for the year to June were seven times higher than those for the same period in 2010-11, which stood at $390.9 million. Fairfax is Australia’s oldest news publisher, and its titles include the country’s oldest paper, The Sydney Morning Herald

The company’s write-down of mastheads and goodwill comes in light of the woeful financial forecasts predicted for the next three years. In a statement following the release of the company’s full-year financial results, Fairfax Chief Executive Greg Hywood said: "The assessment of the carrying value of our intangible assets - mastheads, goodwill and customer relationships - is based on the three-year outlook for each of our business units. That outlook worsened considerably over the course of the second half of the year as the cyclical downturn became more pronounced, and our confidence in a sustained improvement in market conditions reduced."

Commenting on the present state of the advertising market, Hywood expressed his belief that never in his 30-year career had it been in such a bad condition, but he also added that the present drop in advertising revenue was part of a “cycle” and would “inevitably pass.”

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-23 17:00

A new long-form journalism websitecalled Mampoer, and based in South Africa, is preparing to launch in the near future, according to journalism.co.uk's Rachel McAthy. Mampoer, "will invite writers to submit pieces of long-form journalism to be downloadable on digital devices," McAthy writes.

Every daily and Sunday title in Northern Ireland suffered circulation declinesin the latest ABC report according to an article posted on PressGazette.co.uk. Northern Ireland’s largest-selling daily, The Belfast Telegraph, fell 9.2 percent to 53,847, the article states.

The UK's Independent says prosecutors involved in the phone hacking scandal will reveal a list of the names of up to 600 victims"within weeks."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-23 16:54

What do you do when you’ve already launched two incredibly successful publishing platforms? If you’re Twitter co-founders Evan Williams and Biz Stone, the answer is simple: work on another one.

Just over a week ago Obvious Corporation, the company that developed Blogger and Twitter, unveiled Medium, a collaborative publishing tool designed as a simple way for users to express themselves online with images and text. At first glance this basic premise suggests that Medium has little to offer that is not already provided by other blogging sites. Indeed, GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram commentedthat Medium “feels like a cross between Tumblr and Pinterest.” The site’s format is agreeably simple, with both text and photos organised on a grid-based layout. Medium, like Tumblr, provides a simple article template for each post, and a lack of superfluous visual elements and advertisements contribute to an overall sense of elegance and efficiency.  

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-22 16:22

Curation, aggregation, 140 characters, constant updates, 24 hours a day, seven days a week: despite being easier than ever to access, reading the news online can be exhausting. In this digital age we can follow a story from its birth, watch it grow, develop and fade away. The problem is that this process frequently takes place in one quick burst – over the course of a day, maybe two – infusing online news sites like the Huffington Post with a wearying frenetic quality. It’s no secret that the rush to be the first to report breaking news means that concerns such as narrative depth, context and analysis are frequently marginalised, but fortunately for those searching for respite from the onslaught of breaking news, long-form journalism is undergoing a revival.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-21 17:22

A survey conducted by the Pew Research Centre for the People & the Press has revealed rising mistrust of the press in the USA. For the second time since 2002, public faith in the credibility of US news outlets has diminished: the ‘positive believability ratings’ for nine out of the thirteen news organisations included in the poll have experienced a sharp decline, recalling a similar downturn experienced between 2002 and 2004.

The survey covered both television and radio broadcasters and newspaper companies and asked 1001 people to rank the believability of individual news organisations on a 4-point scale. A rating of 4 meant that someone accepted “all or most of what the news organisations say” to be true and 1 indicates that an individual believed “almost nothing”. On average 56% of individuals who contributed to the study gave news titles, including USA Today and The Wall Street Journal, a rating of 3-4 points. This figure stood at 62% only two years ago, and demonstrates a considerable drop in public trust in the news media since 2002 when the average positive rating stood at 71%.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-20 17:30

Big data is 2012’s big buzzword, as many predicted it would be.

The catchy term does not simply denote vast amounts of information, but refers to the emerging technologies developed and employed to gather, process and analyse the tidal wave of new data. “Big Data is really about new uses and new insights, not so much the data itself,” says Rod A. Smith, IBM’s vice president for emerging Internet technologies, in an interview with The New York Times. Human beings have produced more data information in the last two years than at any other time in history: according to IBM’s calculations, 90% of the data currently in existence was created between 2010-2012, thanks to social media posts and interactions, online-browsing history, web-purchase receipts, GPS systems, and sensor and surveillance data. The revolutionary aspect of ‘Big Data’ lies in the way in which it forms links and associations between seemingly disparate facts, leading to new perspectives and revelations.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-20 10:50

After only five issues as a paid-for app, The Huffington Post’s tablet magazine Huffington will now be completely free to download.

The magazine was welcomed into the world with a rooftop party at the Gramercy Park Hotel in New York and presented as a premium content product; a single issue was priced at 99 cents and consumers could buy monthly and annual subscriptions for $1.99 and $19.99 respectively. Speaking to reporters after the magazine’s launch, Executive Editor Tim O’Brien explained the decision to charge for access to content, saying: "We feel it's a premium product and it deserves to carry a price with it in order to access all the value we're giving people."

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-03 16:11

Today the Centre for Investigative Journalism (CIR) has launched a new YouTube channel in the hope of generating ‘revenue that supports the work of nonprofit organizations and independent filmmakers everywhere’. To this end the Knight Foundation has donated $800,000 of funding to the project.

Dedicated to the diffusion of investigative news reporting, the I Files will be curated daily by the CIR and feature videos and playlists from the channel’s high profile media partners. Among the news outlets contributing content are the BBC, The New York Times, Al Jazeera and ABC News, as well as non-profit organisations including the Innovative Reporting Workshop and the Pulitzer Centre on Crisis Reporting. I Files will also feature footage from freelance video journalists and independent filmmakers from all over the world.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-02 14:23

The Daily, Rupert Murdoch’s first attempt at producing a digital-only newspaper, has announced that almost a third of its present employees are to be “released.” Rumours of its imminent demise have dogged the title since it was reportedly placed ‘on watch’ in July.

Of the 170 members of staff employed at The Daily, 50 will lose their jobs. The Sports and Opinion sections, which suffered from light traffic levels, will be particularly hit by the cuts as executives aim to reduce expenditure in underperforming departments. A memo sent to employees by Editor-in-Chief Jesse Angelo explained: “Sports reporting will now be provided by content partners, like Fox Sports […] The Daily will no longer have a standalone Opinion section. Opinion pieces and editorials will appear in the news pages, clearly marked, from time to time as appropriate.” Further efficiency measures include “locking the app in portrait mode,” meaning that digital pages will only be available in vertical layout, with no horizontal formatting option.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-01 14:10

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