Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Newsrooms and Journalism

Statistics released on Wednesday morning by the National Readership Survey have given many quality news titles in Britain reason to be cheerful. Healthy online audiences are proof that falling print circulation at “broadsheet” publications is a result of reader migration to digital editions, not a lack of interest in the news product itself.

For the first time ever, the NRS has taken into account both online and print audiences in its evaluation of readership numbers for British newspapers and magazines. The results produced by the NRS differ to some extent from those posted by the Audit Bureau of Circulations; the ABC’s data is based on the sales and traffic figures provided by individual publications, while the NRS instead uses statistics collected from a joint Nielsen and UKOM survey of 3,500 people.  

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-12 14:11

After running in stealth mode for the past five months as ‘Planet Daily’, the digital video news service ‘NowThisNews’ was officially unveiled on Monday. Using Twitter and Facebook to spread the word about its beta site, NowThisNews will air its first videos in mid-October.

As its mantra “Social. Mobile. Digital” would suggest, the site is set to deliver digital news content direct to consumers’ mobile devices via social media sites. In a press release the NowThisNews team declared their intention to “meet straight on the inevitable and rapid changes happening in news consumption.”

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-11 14:50

A debate has been ignited over the issue of journalism grants and funding.

At the same time that The L.A Times and The Washington Post have received financial support from the Ford Foundation ($1 million and $500,000 respectively), the independently run journalism start-up Homicide Watch was forced to raise funds via a Kickstarter campaign.

The assistance offered to established, for-profit news organisations and the neglect of pioneering journalism projects has raised questions about the kind of support innovative entrepreneurs can expect from institutions interested in protecting the future of quality reporting.

Founded and edited by former crime reporter Laura Amico, Homicide Watch provides in-depth information and reporting on murders committed in the Washington D.C area. With the help of a database designed by Amico’s husband Chris, for the past two years the site has sought to abide by its promise to “Mark every death. Remember every victim. Follow every case.” In doing so, Homicide Watch has attracted a large following in the D.C community and beyond: since its debut in 2010 visits to the site have escalated, rising from 500 a month to reach 300,000 in July of this year.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-10 15:10

Getting to grips with the speed of change brought about by the digital revolution is rarely easy for the news editors at the head of an industry that remained fundamentally unchanged and stable until relatively recently.

Take, for example, the case of news website homepages.

When the rise of the Internet demanded that newspapers engage with their readers through online editions, editors responded (some faster than others) with websites built around homepages that acted as a constantly updated front page. However, the digital world is characterised by relentless advancement and development, meaning that online news strategies frequently become out-dated.

Only a little over year ago the Pew Research Center issued its "Navigating News Online" report, in which the importance of the homepage came under scrutiny. Although users were increasingly finding their way directly to news articles through social media, the data amassed by the report suggested that “the front page of a Website is vital.” For 21 of the 25 news sites taken into account by the Center’s research, the homepage was the most viewed part of the site: at Reuters.com, the homepage attracted 79 percent of all traffic, and 69 percent at news.google.com.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-07 17:19

The Journal Register Company (JRC), whose extensive portfolio of local and regional U.S. news titles includes the New Haven Register and The Trentonian has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Parent company Digital First Media (DFM) confirmed the news on Wednesday and also revealed that it was to sell the company as soon as possible. It is hoped that an auction and sale will be finalised within the next 90 days and 21st CMH Acquisition Company, an affiliate of the Alden Global Capital hedge fund that owns the JRC, has already signed "a stalking horse bid" for the company

Under the direction of DFM’s CEO, John Paton, the Journal Register Company has been steadily making a name for itself as one of the leading innovators of the U.S. news industry. Paton’s firmly held conviction that the future will see print newspapers give way to digital models has seen JRC’s investment in digital ventures rise during his tenure. Since 2009 digital expenses at the company have risen by 151 percent, at a time when general expenditure was greatly reduced.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-06 17:17

"The Knight Foundation announced $3.67 million in matching funds today that will support 20 local news and information projects," reports Jeff Sonderman on Poynter.

"Today Digital First Media announced Journal Register Company has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and will seek to implement a prompt sale," writes Digital First Media CEO John Paton in a post on his blog.

In the UK, the Leveson Inquiry report is now expected to be delivered in November rather than October, according to a story by Lisa O'Carroll on the Guardian.

Mathew Ingram of GigaOM offers advice on "What newspapers and other media could learn from Reddit."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-05 17:51

That is the message global media consultants Simon-Kucher & Partners is hoping to send to news publishers, with a report that makes the case for significant increases in newspaper cover prices.

Price hikes are frequently seen as tangible proof of a newspaper’s declining fortunes, a desperate attempt on editors’ parts to combat dwindling revenue. Take for example Jeff Jarvis’s reaction to the NYTimes’s decision to raise the price of its print edition by 25 percent, from $2 per copy to $2.50. Jarvis doubted the viability of such a move, believing that it aimed to “support an outmoded economic model.” Newspapers, he argued, have lost much of their pricing power as online content puts paid to the advertising models that once made newspapers a powerful economic force. Jarvis’s reflections on the impact digital has had on newspaper ad revenue is valid in the main, but his assertion that increasing cover prices is an exercise in futility finds a counter-argument in SKP’s recent study.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-03 16:07

Every newsroom should have its own seer. Not to predict the next breaking news story (that’s half the fun of being a journalist, surely?) but to foresee how the newspaper model will change and adapt in the future. Keeping a news title abreast of the latest technological and economic challenges is part and parcel of an editor’s role, and is a task that has been rendered all the more urgent over the past two decades as technological advances and a difficult economic climate.

Even without the services of an in-house sibyl, editors have long been second-guessing how content production, publication and delivery will evolve – sometimes with alarming success. The Kaiser memo, written in 1992 by then- managing editor of The Washington Post, Robert Kaiser, is startlingly accurate in many of its predictions. After being told of an impending digital revolution by leading lights in the world of technology, who spoke with certainty of a time when “the PC will be a virtual supercomputer, and the easy transmission and storage of large quantities of text, moving and still pictures, graphics,” Kaiser recommended that the Post get ahead of its competitors by designing “the world’s first electronic newspaper… with a series of ‘front pages’ and other devices that would guide readers the way our traditional cues do -- headlines, captions, story placement, etc.”

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-31 17:17

Just 10 weeks after start-up incubator Betaworks acquired its brand name and URL, the new-look Digg is celebrating its one-month anniversary.

Sporting a pared-down, picture-heavy, ad-free homepage, the site has been dubbed “a Pinterest for news links.” The voting algorithm that was a defining feature of Digg’s previous incarnation remains (though human editors also play a role in curating the site) and articles like "The Five Coolest (and 5 Strangest) Marvel Comics Foodstuffs" prove that its audience has lost none of its interest in the more bizarre elements of the news.

There are however clear signs that not everyone is diggin’ the new format. Initial reaction to the re-launched website lamented the loss of key Digg functions, and four weeks have done little to assuage such concerns. Despite being a central reason for Digg’s initial popularity, the old commenting system has disappeared and users are required to sign in via their Facebook account should they want to interact with articles.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-30 18:14

The Newspaper Association for America (NAA) is said to be preparing a legal challenge to a “sweetheart deal” established between the postal service and Valassis Communications.

Having received approval from the U.S. Postal Regulatory Commission, the agreement will see Valassis receive a substantial rate-cut from the post office, thereby allowing the direct-marketing company to send the kind of preprint advertisements usually carried by newspapers straight to the customer. The mailing system will cost 42 percent less than the service now provided by newspapers.

Newspapers could see advertising revenue diminish by $2.5 billion as a result of the agreement, of which $1 billion could be businesses turning away from the newspaper advertising model altogether.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-30 14:36

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