Date

Wed - 18.10.2017


mobile

Amazon's Kindle 2 is "the trophy wife - sleek, Botox tight and a lot less comfortable than its predecessor," paidContent's Staci Kramer stated Wednesday in her review of Kindle's latest redesign.

The new K2 has a qwerty keyboard and small control called a "5-way button," and unlike K1, it has a home and menu button.

K2 also has a new talk feature that reads the text aloud, which could be of great benefit to some users, Kramer states. Also, migration to from the old Kindle to the new has been made easy. For example, books can be readied for downloads, even before the K2 arrives, and can be moved back and forth between Kindles registered under the same account, she adds.

Subscriptions are more problematic because an issue cannot be transferred between devices, Kramer states in her paidContent blog. However, as soon as she powered the new device on, she "got a message from CEO Jeff Bezos, a K2 Users Guide and a note explaining how to handle the upgrade from Kindle 1."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-25 16:51

One out of every three mobile users who remembered seeing a mobile ad said "they responded to it in some way," while 50 percent of iPhone users said the same, according to fourth quarter 2008 research by mobile social network Limbo and market research agency GfK NOP, eMarketer reported.

According to the research, "iPhone users are than twice as likely as non-iPhone users to browse the mobile Web and more than three times as likely to use location-based services."

The study indicated that most ads viewed both by all mobile users were SMS messages, according to eMarketer.

Rob Lawson, Limbo's CMO and co-founder, told eMarketer that as more and more people move away from SMS-only handsets, the gap between iPhone and non-iPhone users will narrow.

Mobile ad spending is expected to increase by 40 percent to US$2 billion this year, and to $2.9 billion in 2010, according to JPMorgan's report "Nothing But Net," eMarketer reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-20 23:03

Software giant Microsoft, phone manufacturer Nokia and network operators O2 and Orange all announced at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona that they will launch stores to rival Apple's "App Store," which contains nearly 500 million applications ranging from games to travel guides, Telegraph.co.uk reported Tuesday.

"It's no longer about how the phone works by itself but how it works with the Internet," said Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer. "It is your instant access to all the people and information that you care about."
Since mobile phone sales are predicted to plummet by 10 percent in 2009, the initiatives may help boost revenue flows, according to Telegraph.co.uk. Apple's App Store is expected to receive around US$800 in its first year, after being launched in July 2008.

Orange Devices Chief Yves Maitre pointed out the move may "drive continued demand of mobile broadband use".

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-02-18 18:50

Satellite broadcaster BSkyB is working with UK-based satellite broadcaster Omnifone on the technology needed to launch an unlimited digital music service to compete with Apple's iTunes, the groups announced at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona Monday, the Guardian reported.

Following its expected launch in the spring, the service will offer Internet access to millions of songs to all broadband users for a small monthly fee. Users will be able to listen to music either through their computers or televisions.

Sky is also looking into linking the music service with its broadband and satellite packages, making it available to anyone in the UK with a broadband connection, the Guardian reported.

The deal is part of an industry-wide move to combat illegal downloading and music piracy. Recording industry body IFPI calculates that 40 billion tracks were downloaded illegally worldwide, according to the Guardian.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-17 19:42

Mobile technology company Ericsson has unveiled a new social networking portfolio for its network operators aimed at allowing user-generated content to be shared across networks, Telecompaper reported Monday.

The Pixl8r initiative is an open-standard solution and allows real time interaction between photo sharing sites, enable mobile customers to share social media across operator portals and receive notification of friends' activities via text message. The other initiative, the Social Media Portal, aids operators in delivering a social networking service compatible to the Pixl8r.

Subscribers can access and post to "diverse Internet communities," and their content is backed up on a community portal, according to Telecompaper.

According to a release from Ericsson, posted by CNNMoney.com, the solution does not require client downloads and "offers significant opportunities for advertising revenues from both mobile and fixed portals, reduces churn and improves brand positioning. It increases data traffic such as MMS, video calling and web portal traffic."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-16 22:45

Phone manufacturer Samsung is "planning internally" to launch the Google Android phone in the second half of 2009, but not in time for the Mobile World Congress as rumours suggested, PC World reported Thursday.

Other manufacturers Sony Ericsson, Motorola, Asus, Toshiba and LG also intend to launch Google's Android system sometime in 2009. G2, T-Mobile's second Android-powered model, produced by Taiwanese portable device manufacturer HTC (High Tech Computer Corporation), is scheduled to enter the market by May.

"The market for entry-level phones is still booming in emerging markets but in more mature markets the middle ground has all but disappeared - consumers are either keeping their existing handsets and trading down to cheaper sim-only deals, or demanding the latest in must-have top of the range gadgetry, including touchscreens," The Guardian reported Thursday.

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Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-02-13 20:01

Google is inviting users to "See where your friends are in real time!" by expanding its Maps for Mobile and iGoogle to allow location-sharing, a new functionalty called Google Latitude. Users can decide if they want to share their location information with a select group of friends, and can then be tracked as their pictures are displayed with location information on a map.

Although users can select privacy controls, "the idea of adding one's minute-by-minute whereabouts to Google's vast storehouse of knowledge still has a certain creep factor," TechNewsWorld's Erika Morphy wrote Tuesday.

According to Google, users can share their locations when both parties agree to the sharing. Users can also share, set or hide their locations while using Google Latitude, and can also choose to turn off the service or only share locations by city-level, rather than down to exact address level.

Using Latitude can be done by either downloading Google Maps for mobile with Latitude to their smartphone's mobile browser, or by adding Latitude to their iGoogle homepage.

However, privacy advocates say they are "appalled" by the new function, and children's groups have said government regulators should make sure the system is fully secure, Times Online reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-02-04 22:40

Social networking is the catalyst of mobile Web users in Western Europe, according to comScore latest data.

In November 2008, 34 percent of mobile phone users in the region who visited social networking sites only accessed social media exclusive of all other mobile Internet content.

Mobile social networking users in Western Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom) accounted for 12.1 million. They are still expanding with a 152 percent increase from November 2007 to November 2008.

The reach of mobile social networking was the highest in the United Kingdom, at 9 percent, almost triple that of Germany, the lowest. The average penetration rate across the five countries was 5 percent.

"A large portion of the growth in the mobile Internet audience can be attributed to social networking," said Alistair Hill, analyst, comScore M:Metrics. "In the UK, for example, the audience of those accessing news and information, but not social networking services, with their mobile browser or an application grew by 149,000 unique users, whereas the number of those exclusively accessing social networking grew by six times that number in the past year."

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-02-02 22:47

The number of U.S. mobile game downloaders increased 17 percent from November 2007 to November 2008. This equaled 8.5 million people, or 3.8 percent of mobile subscribers, comScore reported.

"The rapid growth in smartphone adoption in the United States has provided a boost for mobile gaming, as 34 percent of those downloading a game in November did so using a smartphone," according to Mark Donovan, a senior analyst for comScore.

There was not one smartphone in the top 10 devices for mobile downloads in 2007. However, for 2008, "six out of 10 are smartphones, excluding devices with smartphone-like functionality, such as the Instinct and Voyager, which also make appearances," Donovan added.

The iPhone and BlackBerry Curve have beaten the RAZR and low-end flip phones in terms of popular gaming platforms. The number of smartphone users who download a game almost tripled, while dipping 14 percent among those who own feature phones, comScore reported.

iPhone owners made up 14 percent of overall mobile game downloaders in November, with 32.4 percent of all iPhone users saying they downloaded a game in the month, compared to an overall average of 3.8 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-30 20:03

Many mobile campaigns are done because marketers know they need to be in the mobile space, and the thought process often ends there, which ends up wasting time, effort and money, according to Russel Stromin, founder of mobile marketing solutions provider Strike Media.

However, to be a worthwhile investment, a strategy must be developed before the mobile marketing is executed, he states.

"One of the most useful things any mobile campaign can deliver is information to drive the next one. This means it needs to gather relevant information. For example, we've seen scores of mobile competitions that ask customers to send product barcodes to enter. This is pointless, for two reasons: first, a barcode is pretty much useless as a proof of purchase. Second, it's a wasted opportunity to ask for much more useful information. A postal code will reveal where customers live; a year of birth gives their age; an ID number gives that and more," Stromin states in his article, posted by Biz-Community Africa. "Armed with this growing profile linked to the customer's cellphone number, it becomes possible to craft a much more rewarding, longer-term dialogue."

Companies that plan the goal of the campaign, and how it can be achieved are more likely to gain insight into their customers, while also being helpful for customers, instead of a nuisance, according to Stromin.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-28 23:11

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