Date

Thu - 27.07.2017


mobile

Apple gave The Telegraph an iPad before the rest of the world, and invited them to develop the best app and content they could. The company made great use of the device's attributes - then decided against launching what they had created.

"Our mind has changed from what we thought we would do at the beginning and what we intend to do now," said Tim Rowell, Director of Mobile Product Development at the Telegraph, speaking at the WAN-IFRA America Latina conference in Bogota, Colombia.

What caused the Telegraph to change its approach is surprising. Read more.

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Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2011-03-11 18:28

Acquisition of a 74.9 percent equity interest in the market leader for online brochures / Core business strengthened as part of the digitization campaign / Founders will continue to run the company as "entrepreneurs within the company"

Continue reading on the Axel Springer site

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-07 09:42

USA Today is looking to make an old idea new again, using smart phone-friendly barcodes to connect newspaper readers to digital content that will enhance their reading experience.

The paper announced last week it would begin using Microsoft Tags, a free but proprietary barcode system, to provide mobile users easy access to online videos, photo galleries, and other online materials.

Reading a Tag requires the installation of a free mobile app, a step most smart phone users now take in stride.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-16 17:15

The PDF document format is digital publishing's worst enemy. For a large part, the news industry still relies on this 18-year-old format to sell its content online. PDF is to e-publishing what the steam locomotive is to the high-speed train. In our business, progress is called XML and HTML5.

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-09 17:28

A year ago, publishing on the iPad wasn't on anyone's agenda. Now it seems as if it's all anyone wants to talk about.

Here's what Holm Münstermann, Head of Strategy & Advertising at Axel Springer, Europe's largest newspaper publisher, has to say: "We see the iPad app as the new print."

The reason for this optimism is that the iPad can combine the best of both print and digital - unlike an online portal, it has a beginning and end, and it can be read offline. But it also allows for digital storytelling, navigation, other attributes of the digital world.

Most importantly, the content is paid.

"In print newspapers, we get half our revenue from advertising but the other part we get from our readers, through paid content," says Münstermann, speaking at the ongoing WAN-IFRA Middle East Publishing Conference. "And this is what we lack on digital and it is what's missing in the first wave of digitisation. When we think of a marketing strategy for the iPad, we not only look at the advertising sales, but we have to look at the second chance to establish paid content in the digital world."

More on Münstermann's presentation can be found here.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2011-02-08 18:24

The Associated Press has come up with a way of recreating the bulky Sunday paper, with all those advertising inserts, for the mobile age. The news organization's board just voted to begin testing a mobile version of the preprint circulars that newspapers insert in their weekend sections.

Continue reading on paidContent

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-07 17:31

The mobile landscape is changing fast, says Will Sullivan, and journalists need help keeping up.

Figuring out which apps to use can be a challenge, not to mention picking a phone. Aside from deciding between two iPhones (Verizon or AT&T) there are also dozens of Android models across multiple wireless carriers.

This environment demands that editors and managers become more informed and able to respond more quickly to new mobile technologies.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-24 20:47

When the iPad was launched last year, much was made of how it would revolutionize video and other media consumption. But new research may not spell good news for all those companies hoping to profit from that kind of use.

Apparently, current iPad owners are proving to be a little stingy when it comes to paying for content like TV shows and magazines.

Continue reading on paidcontent.org

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-19 17:50

Many news publishing related trends built up speed and began taking hold in 2010, and are worth watching and considering further in 2011.

In no particular order, those trends are:

Coupons and daily deals

Leading the pack in 2010 was Chicago-based Internet coupon service Groupon Inc., which turned down a US$6 billion buyout offer from Google in early December and secured $500 million (of $950 million) at the end of the month.

Publishers around the globe are trying out Groupon-like daily deals as a way to engage readers, and are beginning to see success.

Social networking

If 2009 was the year your mom joined Facebook, then 2010 was the year everyone else did, from your grandfather to your 12-year-old niece.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-31 22:07

Amazon presented today the update for its Kindle for Android app, allowing readers to access more than 100 and magazines, Editor & Publisher revealed.

"Amazon has long offered access to newspaper and magazine content via its Kindle hardware devices, but this is the first time that functionality has been extended to third-party gadgets," explained Mashable.

The new app includes publications likes The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Economist and Reader's Digest, according to Amazon. Users can purchase single copies or subscribe content.

It also allows readers to share books, zoom in images and download recent issues of the publications they subscribe to.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-17 22:15

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