Date

Tue - 12.12.2017


mobile

Amazon is lowering its price on e-reader Kindle 2 to US$259, and at the same time other e-readers are on the market for more affordable prices ($199 for the Sony Reader Pocket Edition, for example), PC World reported today. The lower prices and wider range of content and distribution have created media buzz about the e-reader category, which is likely to translate to sales, according to Forrester Research.

In the United States, e-reader sales are rising faster than experts had predicted, and are expected to reach three million by the end of the year, according to Forrester's Sarah Rotman Epps.

Sales are growing faster than Forrester had originally expected, mostly due to "falling device prices, more content availability, better retail distribution and lots and lots of media buzz," Epps stated.

However, she warns: "Our holiday projections should be seen for what they are: An acknowledgment that 2009 has been and will be a year of breakout success for eReaders, tempered by realism that retailers, despite their best intentions, are still learning how to sell these products to curious but uninformed consumers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-07 23:55

Two percent, or two hours per month, of all TV viewing in the United States happens outside traditional TV devices, Media Post reported.

According to a recent survey conducted by Horowitz Associates, 2 percent represents two hours out of the overall 130.2 hours American TV viewers watch in a month.

Of those who had a PC or laptop, 9 percent, or 13 hours out of 138.6 monthly TV-content consuming hours, is spent on a platform other than a TV set. Among those multichannel viewers who watch TV content on a handheld device, 8 percent, or 12 hours out of the 143.1 monthly hours, is viewed on a platform other than a TV set.

The most popular Web destinations to view videos included YouTube.com, ABC.com. Hulu.com and NBC.com. Those types of programs people watched most on alternative video platforms are scripted dramas (24 percent); news programming (14 percent); comedy shows (13 percent); sports (13 percent); and sitcoms (11 percent).

Thirty-six percent of respondents said they wish all their favorite shows were available online, while another 30 percent wish all TV programmes were available on handheld devices, according to Horowitz.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-07 23:33

Mobile Internet usage in the United States is up, mostly driven by smartphones like the iPhone, according to a Nielsen report. However, only about one out of four wireless subscribers logged onto the mobile Web in July, Media Week reported.

According to Nielsen, mobile Internet users accounted for 56.9 million in July, up 34 percent from 42.5 million last year.

However, another Nielsen report published in January pointed out that there were close to 225 million mobile subscribers in the U.S., which means only one-fourth of them use mobile Internet. It's still lower than PC Web usage and lagging far behind mainstream media such as TV.

Surprisingly, although many young urban adults and business travelers contributed to so many iPhones and Blackberry device purchases, it's teens and seniors whose usage has spiked, with a 45 percent and 67 percent surge in usage among teens 13-17 and users 65 and older, respectively, in July.

The mobile Web users still skews male (53 percent), but the number for women is growing fast. Nielsen said in July female users soared by 43 percent, compared to only a 26 percent growth among men, Media Week reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-02 18:43

Metro Canada launched English-language mobile versions for iPhones and Blackberries in September, and will release French versions in October, Newspaper Innovation reported this week.

Metro will also begin using 2D barcodes in print versions, to allow readers to scan the barcodes with their mobiles and receive additional information on the subjects.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-01 16:10

Because so many people use mobile phones, and because mobiles can receive so many types of information, from text to multimedia, the mobile platform is positioned to both reach fragmented audiences and increase interaction between users and brands, according to Havas Digital's report, Mobext Insight Global Mobile: A Worldview.

Each day, the mass-reach of text and picture messaging on mobile grows in Asia, Europe and America, making it an increasingly important multimedia communications channel, according to report. Yet, mobile marketing is in its infancy.

"Given high SMS penetration in the US and Western europe, Mobext believes SMS should be offered as a consumer response channel wherever possible, especially for non-interactive media like traditional television, print and outdoor. As targeting becomes available, for example, through location-based services like mobile search that are still in an experimental stage, marketers willing to innovate can break through the clutter of marketing messages," the report states.

The report recommends agencies adopt consumer guidelines for planning mobile initiatives, such as those developed by the Mobile Marketing Association.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-28 14:06

According to a new report from eMarketer, end users are adopting mobile technology faster than advertisers, but the gap is expected to become smaller over the next four years, ClickZ reported.

However, in 2009, mobile advertising spending will reach $416 million, representing only 2.2 percent of total online display ad spending, according to the report, "Mobile Advertising and Marketing: Change Is in the Air."

According to the report's author, Noah Elkin, advertisers are eager to explore mobile to reach consumers, but "have been hampered by the diversity of the hardware, the complexity of the platform, and the lack of advertising options on less-sophisticated devices," ClickZ reported.

Besides, only few marketers have so-called "mobile budgets" today, the report pointed out. "For all intents and purposes, there's no such thing as a mobile budget. Rather, mobile remains at most a line item in the digital portion of most budgets, if it is there at all," Eric Bader, president of mobile marketing agency Brand in Hand, said to eMarketer.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-24 18:38

Newspaper publishers have expressed an increased interest in mobile distribution and advertising as they aim to expand their brands, according to a survey by the Audit Bureau of Circulations, Media Post News reported Monday.

"Going Mobile: How Publishers Are Preparing for the Burgeoning Digital Market," surveyed 375 publishing executives, 52 percent of which said they are providing mobile access to their publications. Fifty-eight percent of publishers said they have created Web sites specifically for mobile, or formatted their sites for mobile.

Graphic: Audit Bureau of Circulations

The survey also found that 70 percent of respondents are giving more focus to mobile distribution compared with last year, Marketing Magazine reported Monday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-22 19:50

U.S. mobile Internet users will reach more than 70 million this year, and more and more retailers have launched mobile commerce programs. However, mobile commerce still has a long way to go, according to eMarketer.

Web-enabled mobile users tend to use their devices to gather weather information, read news, find movie times and do online banking, rather than to make purchases.

"A number of retailers and third-party developers have introduced mobile apps that give consumers powerful new shopping tools and added convenience," according to eMarketer senior analyst Jeffrey Grau, who is also the author of the new report, "Mobile Commerce: Ahead of Its Time." "But most retailers are either standing on the sidelines or in the midst of planning their mobile commerce strategy."

Capital constraints and privacy and security issues are the biggest obstacles for m-commerce developments, according to an April 2009 survey by RIS News.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-03 16:58

Global mobile ad spending will reach $913.5 million, up 74 percent this year. However, it does not really accelerate until 2011, according to a new Gartner report, "as advertisers are expected to boost mobile spending as part of an overall shift toward digital marketing channels," MediaPost reported.

The spending will exeed $13 billion by 2103, with Asia Pacific leading the way, followed by North America and Europe

The trend will boost after 2011 as smartphones and flat-rate data plans become more affordable to users. "The growth in mobile advertising revenues is primarily driven by mobile Web banner ads, but it also has a strong growth component from mobile search, downloadable applications and SMS advertising," according to the report, titled "Mobile Advertising Grows Quietly"

In 2013, Gartner expects smartphones to account for 45.5 percent of all mobile phone sales, compared to just 9 percent in 2008, MediaPost reported.

While data usage is increasing most rapidly among smartphone users, "the increased mobile media consumption is leading Web publishers to create more user-friendly versions of their mobile sites, which in turn is lifting mobile Web access among non-smartphone users," said Gartner analyst Andrew Frank.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-01 20:14

"Why Don't Teens Tweet?" has become a popular question in the past few months. According to the New York Times last week, only 11 percent of Twitters are teens, TechCrunch reported.

11 percent seems a small number, but actually it has a higher concentration of teens compared to Facebook, with only 9 percent of user being teens, which means Twitter is more teen friendly than Facebook.

Actually, teens tweet more than the general population, according to a Silicon Valley Insider post yesterday, "Kids Don't Hate Twitter Anymore." Also, comScore stated that Twitter's unique visitor composition index in the age group of 12 to 17 is 118, higher than those in the group of 25 to 34 and 35 to 44.

Another similar figure: these teen Twitters do so 5.2 times in a month, more often than those between 25 and 44, who tweet 5 times or fewer per month.

So, Twitter actually skews more teen than the average sites, as well as Facebook, according to TechCrunch. The question we need to ask instead should be: Why don't the majority of teens tweet?

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-31 21:35

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