Date

Mon - 20.11.2017


Launches and Closures

The Global Mail, a non-profit news site that aims to "deliver original, fearless, independent journalism", has launched in Australia this morning, reports Journalism.co.uk.

The Global Mail is funded by philanthropist Graeme Wood, founder of the accommodation website wotif.com. Wood has donated over $15 million to the new publication, which should be enough to support the site through its first 5 years, says editor-in-chief Monica Attard.

Attard, a former broadcast journalist for ABC, said in an interview with The Australian that there will be a separation between the site's benefactor and its editorial content. "Graeme is chairperson of The Global Mail board. He has no editorial input whatsoever," she asserts.

The Global Mail lists two other board members on its website: Saad Mohseni, Chairman and CEO of MOBY, a media company based in Afghanistan with interests in the Middle East, and Jenny Wheatley, a chartered accountant.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-06 15:22

Facebook's $5 billion IPO filing this week has left the world in little doubt about the growing importance of social media in our lives. Now, both adapting to this trend and looking at its power, Reuters has launched a social media hub with a special focus on the interaction between social media and business.

Social Pulse, as the new hub is called, contains a curated selection of news from across Reuters' social media networks. The top section, titled The Hit List, features the most popular stories shared by people followed by Reuters accounts and Reuters journalists on Twitter. In a blogpost about Social Pulse, Reuters stresses that it follows influential "newsmakers", to bring its readers stories popular with the people who are setting the news agenda. The section is managed through the curation company Percolate, also used by IPG and American Express.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-03 18:08

Are international editions a luxury that newspapers with declining circulation can't afford?

In this digital age, increasingly it looks like international print editions are under threat. An article in The Guardian last Sunday speculated that the International Herald Tribune, the global edition of the New York Times, might be about to shut up shop. Author Peter Preston writes that after selling its stake in the Boston Red Sox and its regional newspaper group, getting rid of the Tribune might be the logical next step for the New York Times.

Preston calls the Tribune "very vulnerable" as senior editors are being called back from the IHT headquarters in Paris to other jobs in New York. He notes that the paper "doesn't make money. It struggles to keep circulation over 200,000 worldwide. And, crucially, it doesn't have a website of its own".

The article is based on conjecture (and it should be pointed out, The Guardian's own circulation was 230,108 in December and it has been losing money for some time) but perhaps Preston raises an important point about the cost of printing international editions. When print production everywhere is under threat, it's no surprise that they're the first to go.


Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-25 12:54

The Chicago Tribune has announced that it will be offering subscribers a new Sunday books section as a piece of premium paid content.

Printers Row, as the section will be called, will cost Tribune subscribers an additional $99 a year. Those who sign up will get a 24-page book supplement every Sunday, featuring reviews, interviews with authors and news from Chicago's literary scene as well as a free book of short stories each week.

The Chicago Tribune describes the launch in its own business section as "a means to bolster revenue beyond the traditional subscription and advertising model" by offering readers with niche interests a high-quality targeted product that they will be willing to pay for. Gerould Kern, senior vice president and editor of the Chicago Tribune states that "audiences want very specialized information, and we are going to give them that".

The Tribune compares its model to cable TV subscriptions, which encourage users to sign up to a basic package and then pay for extra premium channels.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-24 18:07

Le Huffington Post, a French edition of AOL's popular news, blogging and aggregation site, The Huffington Post, was launched today in collaboration with Le Monde and Les Nouvelles Editions Independantes.

At a press conference held at Le Monde's headquarters in Paris this morning, Arianna Huffington, president and editor in chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, promised that the new edition would offer the HuffPo's trademark mix of original reporting, aggregation, bloggers and commentators.

However, Huffington stated that although the "architecture" of Le Huffington Post would be imported, the site would be "rooted in French culture" and that it was "absolutely essential" that the local journalists set the agenda.

There will still be some connections between Le Huffington Post and its American cousin. Huffington stated that her media group had already employed a "couple dozen" translators so that stories could be converted into English and French and shared on both sides of the Atlantic. But despite this exchange, Huffington stressed that "the editorial teams are completely different".

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-23 14:57

British tabloid The Daily Mail is broadening its online presence with the introduction of Mail Online India, reports Roy Greenslade in The Guardian today.

The new page is integrated into Mail's UK website, but contains content from Mail Today, a publication launched by the Daily Mail's parent company Daily Mail & General Trust together with the India Today Group in November 2007.

Mail Online India features Mail Today's logo on its banner, but it also reproduces large amounts of content from its British counterpart; the 'Femail' section, for example, is identical on both sites' home pages.

Greenslade writes that the new page is a "natural move for the Mail's ultimate owner" DMGT, considering its investment in the Mail Today. In fact, as Greenslade acknowledges, that investment is not so large. Indian law places restrictions on foreign media ownership and DMGT has only a 26% stake in the Dehli-based paper. But despite this relatively small share, Greenslade notes that in DMGT's annual report, published last week, the media group has promised to use its relationship with partners as a "foundation to extend Mailonline's presence in the market".

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-19 15:08

As print sales across Europe decline, what's a paper to do? As we reported earlier this week, taking advantage of different types of media is one option.

Swiss national daily Tages-Anzeiger has taken a step in this direction with the launch of a TV streaming app for iPad called TV Sélection. The paper is offering its users a choice of TV programs, feature movies and documentaries from over 100 channels hosted through TV streaming service Zattoo.

Why would users go to the app, rather than straight to Zattoo itself? This is where the editorial experience of the Tages-Anzeiger kicks in. Journalists from the paper's culture section will curate and select the best programs to create what Computer World calls "a more personal experience" that eliminates "aimless channel-flicking".

Programs are stored on part of the app called 'Total Recall' and can be viewed for a limited period after they are first made available.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-18 18:21

Barely a day seems to go by without a publisher launching a new app for Apple or Android. But now it's Microsoft's turn for a spot in the limelight, as Rupert Murdoch's News Corp announces its launch of a range of apps for Xbox 360.

Those who sign up to News Corp's Gold Subscription Package - costing £39.99 a year - will now get access to content from FOX, Fox News Channel, The Wall Street Journal and other News Corp media on their Xbox.

Most relevant to news publishers is the app from The Wall Street Journal, WSJLive. The app will offer four hours of live programming from across the Journal's other digital platforms. This will not only include content from the Journal's core new site, but also from its subsidiaries Dow Jones Newswires, Barron's, MarketWatch, SmartMoney and All Things D.

The FOX Broadcasting app and Fox News Channel app will give viewers access to news programs and to entertainment shows like The Simpsons, Glee, Bones and House. The apps will be integrated with Facebook, giving them a social dimension, and will also make use of Xbox Kinect's voice and motion control technology. Only "authenticated subscribers of participating cable and satellite television distributors" will be able to view Fox video content.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-11 14:11

The Wall Street Journal has launched The Wall Street Journal Deutschland today: a digital German-language edition of it paper, available at www.wsj.de and via mobile and tablet apps.

National reporting will come from journalists at the Mudoch-owned Dow Jones Newswire, and international news will be supplied by The Wall Street Journal's 2000 worldwide correspondents. A team of around 10 editors based in Frankfurt will prepare articles for publication in the new edition.

The German edition is promoting itself as a digital only publication, proudly declaring on its Twitter feed this morning that it is "only on the web, never from the kiosk". The new managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Deutschland Knut Engelmann is quoted by the German tabloid Bild as a strong supporter of new media: "market surveys show that people want to consume news on the go and in real time. That means that a printed daily paper will always lag behind."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-10 16:12

A piece of music sounds normally sounds better when all the parts are played together. And Slovakian start-up Piano Media argues that, when it comes to paywalls, news publications are also better off when their strategies work in harmony.

Piano Media, founded in May 2011 by Tomáš Bella, former editor-in-chief of SME Online, the digital division of Slovakia's largest newspaper, has persuaded most of Slovakia's major media outlets to sign up to a single-payment system. This means that the country's major news sites share a paywall, and split the revenue between themselves - 40% goes to the news site where the reader bought his or her Piano subscription, 30% goes to the site where a reader is spending his or her time online and 30% goes to Piano Media itself. Its system makes the users' experiences easier by offering a simple pay plan and by reducing the feeling that readers are paying one company for content that they could get for free elsewhere.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-10 10:56

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