Date

Mon - 20.11.2017


Journalism

It's up and up for Mail Online. The Guardian reports that, according to data from the Audit Bureau of Circulation, the site boasted just under 100 million monthly browsers in January. Mail Online was named as the world's biggest newspaper site by comScore last month.

The Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas has noted that a police investigation into the killing of Brazilian editor Paulo Rocaro has found stronger evidence that he was murdered because of his journalistic work. Rocaro covered stories about drug trafficking on the border between Brazil and Paraguay.

The New York Times reported two days ago that Google plans to launch a pair of high-tech glasses "that will be able to stream information to the wearer's eyeballs in real time." Forbes ponders the ways that the new technology could revolutionise virtual advertising.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-23 18:41

Sunday Times reporter Marie Colvin and French photographer Rémi Ochlik were killed by shelling in the Syrian city of Homs today, reports the New York Times. The Guardian notes that David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Rupert Murdoch, among others, have paid tribute to Colvin, a veteran war reporter.

Mozilla has announced that it will be launching a cross-platform app store later this year. Submissions should be open next week at the Mobile World Congress, TechCrunch reports

The Washington Post has published a graph, which it says shows the future both of advertising and of media. The graph compares the amount of time consumers spend on different platforms with the ad spend per media and demonstrates that ad spending on web and mobile is small in proportion to customer interest.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-22 18:51

Reuters writes that Twitter has formed a partnership with Russian search engine Yandex, which has a 60% share of the Russian internet market, to create a real-time search. As part of the deal, Twitter will give Yandex access to its "firehose" of public Tweets.

Robert Fisk reports for The Independent on continued press freedom issues - and other social problems - in Tunisia after the revolution.

Bill Keller of the New York Times has published an editorial about WikiLeaks explaining that, in his view, "the most palpable legacy of the WikiLeaks campaign for transparency is that the U.S. government is more secretive than ever."

The Committee to Protect Journalists has released a report on "Attacks on the Press in 2011."

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-21 18:35

Once upon a time, news flows were relatively simple. Information would travel from a source to a news organisation, to the general public. Although that chain might not have been quite as simple as it seemed (a journalist might influence his or her sources, or public reactions might influence a news organisation) for the most part, information flowed one way, and one way only.

Now a new regional SFN report from WAN-IFRA, authored by Professor Christof Seeger and Leander Blumenthal describes the way that social media and digital publishing has turned this news flow upside-down. The report, titled "Communication and gatekeeper research" points out that media organisations are no longer the primary "gatekeepers" of information; an engaged public also plays an important role in curating news by deciding what content to republish, recommend or pass on.

What's more, as every internet user becomes a potential publisher, the old formula in which news professionals would look through sources and select the most relevant for publication has also been turned on its head: sources are now published first on social networks and edited after the fact.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-20 19:03

"Everybody is a journalist now".

This phrase has been repeated so many times that it's become a cliché, but that's not to say that a consensus has been reached about what it really means for the news industry. How should news organisations approach material from citizen journalists? Should lines be drawn between professional and citizen media? How can the work of citizen journalists be effectively verified?

These were some of the questions raised at the session titled "Professional and "Citizen" Journalism Working Together after WikiLeaks" at the UNESCO conference on The Media World after WikiLeaks and News of the World, where several panellists suggested that collaboration between citizen and professional reporters was best model.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-20 10:23

The Economist's debate on the pros and cons of social media wraps up today. So far, 69% of readers have agreed with Jeff Jarvis, who is defending the motion that "society benefits when we share personal information online".

Media Helping Media has published an article running through the basics of fact-checking for journalists.

The Guardian reports that, for the London Olympics, the BBC will be broadcasting the men's 100 meter final in 3D.

The Hollywood Reporter and Billboard have made a deal to share their content through the Associated Press's digital platforms. The AP announces in a press release that the two new brands will become available through its distribution network this month.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-15 18:41

Poynter has published an article about how Siri could enhance news coverage if Apple decides to make the technology available to third-party apps this summer.

El Pais is integrating its news production to become a "single brand with multiple platforms". The paper announces the launch of a new sport section and changes to its web portal in the next few days.

The Times of London has created a new web app, which takes the experience of reading a tablet newspaper, and mimics it in your web browser, reports Journalism.co.uk.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-14 18:42

Valentine's Day is a fake holiday only celebrated by gift card companies, right?

Wrong. Apparently now it's celebrated by the news industry too.

Part of this is traditional news coverage, for example from the Daily Mail and the Times of London, which both ran stories today at the top of their home pages describing the Valentine's gifts that the Duchess of Cambridge received during charity visits that she made in Liverpool.

But various news organisations have also been using Valentine's Day as an opportunity to boost reader engagement by publishing user-generated content. The Guardian, pushing interactivity as always, has created a Flickr group inviting readers to send in their Valentine's Day pictures. The best images, the paper promises, will be published as part of a gallery.


Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-14 18:04

Who said long-form journalism was dead? Time Out Chicago announces the upcoming launch of The Chicagoan, an ad-free 194-page magazine with a cover price of $19.95. Editor-in-chief and publisher J.C. Gabel states that the content is "really an amalgamation of the best of New York magazine, the New York Review of Books and The New Yorker".

Reporters Without Borders has expressed concern that several foreign journalists have been refused visas to Bahrain in the run-up to the one year anniversary of the uprising that took place in the country.

Piano Media, the company that has set up national paywalls in Slovakia and Slovenia, is planning to bump up its Slovakian subscriptions fees by about 25%, Nieman Lab reports. Piano spokesman David Brauchli thinks that "opposition to payment at this point is not socio-economic but rather philosophical" and "those who are going to pay will pay whether the price is €2.90 or €3.90 per month."

The Amazon Kindle may soon be launched in Japan and Brazil, reports paidContent

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-13 17:09

Sales of i have risen 47% year on year according to ABC figures reported by Press Gazette. This makes it the only UK national daily to have increased year on year circulation last month.

As PrimaComunicazione reported, there's also been some good news for the Italian newspaper market. Audipress, the national bureau tracking newspapers circulation, announced that daily papers' readership grew of the 3% between September and December 2011, compared to the period April-July.

Nieman Lab reports that the Wall Street Journal has been using Instagram and Pinterest to cover New York fashion week. Pinterest, an increasingly popular, invitation-only social network, has a high proportion of young, female users.

Facebook has updated its format to give ads a more prominent position, writes BetaBeat.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-10 18:18

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation