Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


Journalism

The Wall Street Journal reports that Google will soon start selling its own Android-powered tablets. Google previously tried to capture the smartphone market with the Nexus One.

The Economist announced that it has officially reached 1 million fans on Facebook, journalism.co.uk reported.

POLITICO will be joining The Charlotte Observer in the creation of a daily newspaper that will cover the Democratic National Convention this September, according to its website. For the 2008 convention, POLITICO teamed up with The Denver Post and the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

The European Journalism Centre reported that a documentary titled 18DaysinEgypt, co-founded by American documentary filmmaker and journalist Jigar Mehta, features crowd-sourced material of the revolution in Egypt.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-30 16:39

Gazeta Wyborcza is not only Poland’s leading national daily; it also has 20 local editions and staff around the country. Those editions included sports sections – both in print and online – but they weren’t working.

“Before we developed Sport.pl/local, no sport section had traffic of more than 100,000 page views per month. There were no digital revenues. Seventy per cent of content came from the print section,” says Marcin Gadzinski, Head of Development for Sport.pl, which replaced the local websites to great success.

The reason it worked? Gazeta Wyborcza recognised that other newspapers were no longer their main competition for sport.

For more on this story, please see our Sports News Conference Blog

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-03-30 15:25

Former editor and publisher of the Rocky Mountain News John Temple was named the new managing editor of The Washington Post, Politico reported. Temple will also serve as senior digital editor.

According to Adweek, Google announced a "microsurvey" option for publishers to use to earn advertising revenue instead of blocking online content with a paywall.

The Center for Investigative Reporting and The Bay Citizen of the San Francisco Bay area announced their merger on Tuesday, Poynter reported.

Journalism.co.uk explains how journalists can use the Timeline program for digital storytelling. Read all of the tips here.

Michael Wolff at the Guardian delves into the difficulties news organisations are having in generating mobile ad revenue.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-29 17:20

Do you want to improve your Twitter skiils? The USA Today College put together a list of nine Twitter "experts" who have their fingers on the pulse of modern journalism.

The American press is "complacent," "self-regarding" and "too up themselves" says Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre in an interview he gave to New Yorker's Lauren Collins, the Guardian reported. Read the whole interview on the New Yorker here.

Google announced its collaboration with the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory with the aim of helping "to preserve and digitize thousands of archival documents, photographs and videos about Nelson Mandela".

The Poynter Institute and the European Journalism Centre are collaborating on an new e-learning course on “Reporting & Writing About Development in the World” for 40 journalism students from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia, EJC announced.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-03-27 15:30

Index on Censorship is marking its 40th anniversary of with a special issue, including an article on freedom of speech by Aung San Suu Kyi, reports Roy Greenslade for The Guardian. Greenslade notes that Index is also making its complete archive available online for free for the next 40 days.

Knight Blog has published an entry about Mercer University’s Center for Collaborative Journalism. As part of Mercer’s program, students will learn reporting skills from experienced journalists, and journalists will learn digital expertise from the students. 

Journalism.co.uk writes that since The Guardian opened up an office in New York seven months ago, the paper’s digital readership in the US has grown from 15 million to just under 20 million users. 

An in-depth article in Foreign Policy magazine considers the pressures on the Pakistani media, both from repressive government policies and from a lack of internal self-regulation.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 15:47

Tanya Cordrey, digital development director for Guardian News and Media, announced that traffic from The Guardian’s Facebook app surpassed traffic fromGoogle searches on multiple occasions this past February, predicting that social will eventually drive traffic more than search overall, journalism.co.uk reported.

In the spring issue of Nieman Reports, past newspaper editors of The Los Angeles TimesThe Philadelphia Inquirer and others responded to this question: “What would you change if you were back in charge?” Read some of their insights here

Editor & Publisher discusses six easy strategies that newspapers can use to establish more of a digital presence, including engaging with readers through social networking

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-22 18:57

You can’t reduce journalism to a simple formula. But if you had to try, a pretty good guess might be “good content + effective distribution = success.”

A new partnership announced between Digital First Media and ProPublica fits well into the equation. As part of the deal, ProPublica will provide Digital First Media with pre-publication access to its news apps, which in the past have taken the form of easily searchable databases of information in the public interest, such as Dollars for Docs, which allows users to see how much money their doctor has accepted from pharmaceutical companies. Digital First Media will then be able to use the content of these apps as a basis for stories at different publications across its large network of local newspapers.

Yet it would be an inaccurate undersell to say that ProPublica is simply providing information and Digital First Media sharing it. Digital First Media journalists won’t simply be distributing the data, they should be building on it to create stories that show its specific local relevance.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-22 18:39

Evgeny Morozov at Slate describes the possible effect that Narrative Science, a program that turns data and statistics into text articles, could have on journalism. Forbes already uses articles produced by Narrative Science, and they are cheap in comparison to those produced by professional journalists; the New York Times reported last year that one of Narrative Science’s customers paid under $10 per 500-word story. 

The New York Times is reducing the number of online articles available to non-subscribers from 20 to 10, writes Peter Kafka for All Things D. However, the Times will still allow users to go over the 10-article limit if they access articles by following a link from Twitter or Facebook

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-20 18:21

Guardian's Ruaridh Nicoll interviewed Tyler Brûlé, editor of the magazine Monocleand "the man who sold the world," according to the article. Read the article here.

What are the biggest daily obstacles journalists face in getting things done? The answer in a word cloud by Digital First's John Paton (via Poynter).

Media Business reports that The Wall Street Journal launches its first online show produced outside of the US.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-19 20:54

“The servers are down!"

In many newsrooms, this might be a sentence you’d associate with small budgets and dodgy IT equipment. But in a growing number of cases, it’s a symptom of a much more serious threat against news organisations – cyber attacks.

In a speech to be delivered today, BBC director general Mark Thompson is due to address the issue of cyber attacks on the British broadcaster following a campaign of intimidation from Iran.

In extracts of Thompson’s speech, which have been released in advance by the BBC, he describes "a day recently when there was a simultaneous attempt to jam two different satellite feeds of BBC Persian into Iran, to disrupt the Service's London phone-lines by the use of multiple automatic calls, and a sophisticated cyber-attack on the BBC."

Although Thompson stops just short of directly accusing Iranian authorities of perpetrating the attack, he calls the circumstances "self-evidently suspicious".

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-14 18:39

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