Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


Journalism

The Committee to Protect Journalists reported that Brazil, Pakistan, and India objected to a United Nations plan that sought to strengthen protections for members of the press and reduce violence against journalists. UNESCO delegates met in Paris last month to debate the plan.

According to Mashable, YouTube has opened its Partner Program to all content creators in 20 countries. To become a YouTube partner, users must "monetize" at least one original video.

Read It Later rebrands itself as Pocket: the app that allows users to save online articles and other content for later now has several new features, including video filters and organizational tools, TechCrunch reports.

Today, The New York Times relaunched its healthy-living section Well with a new logo and more of an independent look, Nieman Journalism Lab reports. Check out the new homepage here.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-17 18:10

Bye bye long-text articles and hello multimedia? The popular article-saving app Read In Later, which had been equated a few years ago with Longform.org or @longreads as a saviour of long-form journalism, has been rebranded and relaunched as "Pocket," focusing on video and image content as well as text.

As TechCrunch explains, Pocket allows users to save content from the web and has a mission “similar to Dropbox’s,” enabling you to save content on any of your devices, then access it on all of them. It also allows you to read articles offline, a function that its founder, Nate Weiner, previously suggested could be useful for allowing readers to save magazine-length articles during a busy day, and come back and read them later.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-17 18:08

Last month’s circulation figures reveal that circulation of The Sun Sunday have fallen to 2.4 million a week, reports Press Gazette . On the day it was launched in February, the new News International Sunday tabloid sold 3.2 million copies.

One golden egg becomes many: media expert Ken Doctor suggests that the future of news publishing lies not in one big cure-all for print losses, but with assembling a combination of many small ventures to rebuild the industry piece by piece. Read his “newsonomics ” on Nieman Journalism Lab.

Mashable reports that British blogger John Graham Kerlen was convicted of tweeting “grossly offensive malicious communications” about Bexley Councilor Melvin Seymour and now faces up to six months of jail time. Kerlen, who used profanity in the tweets, was initially charged with harassment.

The BBC College of Journalism’s Elise Wicker describes how small, cheap hand-held cameras are being used to boost the world service’s reporting.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-16 16:49

Washington Business Journal reported that USA Today Publisher David Hunke will be retiring. The Gannett-owned newspaper has also been looking for a new editor-in-chief since John Hillkirk left the post in November, the article said.

Hearst has launched a new digital lifestyle magazine titled Good Ideas, a sister publication of Good Housekeeping, PressGazette reported. Designed to be read on mobile devices, the magazine will also be available in print.

According to AsiaOne news, South African newspaper The Star launched a new tabloid edition, which will be aimed towards a black audience. Star Africa will focus on news and culture for working-class townships, the article said.

Idea Lab reports that the Knight-Mozilla Partnership is refocusing and expanding: read about the changes here

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-11 17:50

Facebook announced its acquisition of Instagram, a popular iPhone photography app, for $1 billion, The Guardian reported. Instagram, which has more than 30 million users, recently launched an Android app version.

According to CNET, Iranian Minister for Information and Communications Technology Reza Taghipour announced that Iran intends to create a "national intranet" which would block citizens from accessing outside Internet sites such as Google and replace them with government-sponsored websites.

A false report that South Carolina Governor Nikki R. Haley was about to be indicted went viral on Twitter, and was picked up by major news organisations before it was discovered to be false, writes The New York Times. The paper writes that the incident prompted fresh questions about whether retweets imply endorsements.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-10 16:45

Google has unveiled “Project Glass” - new augmented reality glasses, which allow users to interact with Google products and see extra information projected onto the world around them. Slate has a link to Google’s impressive video about the new product. 

Sky News has responded to Guardian reports that its News Managing Editor Simon Cole authorised a journalist to hack into the email account of a woman charged with helping her husband to fake his own death, reports Poynter. Sky maintains that its conduct was “editorially justified and in the public interest” and suggests that the Guardian is guilty of “double standards” for not acknowledging its public interest defence. The Guardian writes that “sensitivities at Sky News are running high” as its parent company BSkyB is investigated by the media regulator OfCom in the wake of the phone-hacking scandal at the News of the World.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-05 17:20

The Wall Street Journal reports that Yahoo has announced it will be laying off around 2,000 employees – 14% of its total workforce. The Journal states that the decision has been “long-expected” as the digital company has been struggling with a lack of revenue growth and decreasing traffic to some of its sites. According to a source, further cuts are anticipated.

Foreign Policy magazine writes that, despite earlier commitments made by the US government to preserve “Internet freedom”, the US produces a high proportion of the tools used around the world to supress freedom of speech online.

Bambuser, a video broadcasting service, joins forces with the Associated Press to allow users to share citizen journalist videos directly with the wire service, according to thenextweb.com. Bambuser users have covered events in Egypt and Syria.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-04 17:17

Newspapers no longer just cover sports – they compete with them.

The footballer Cristiano Ronaldo has 42 million fans on Facebook. Nike puts out a sports magazine as good as any done by the traditional press. Fan sites are the go-to destination for millions who once turned to newspapers as the primary source for sports news.

When athletes, teams, sports organisations and sporting good companies become publishers themselves, the fundamental relationship between sport and media changes. Do they even need traditional media anymore? Sports editors and media executives gathered in Madrid last week to discuss how they can successfully compete with these new challengers.

A report on their discussions can be downloaded, without charge, from: http://www.wan-ifra.org/events/3rd-international-sports-news-conference.

For more on this story, please see our main WAN-IFRA website.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-04 11:07

Using data gathered by citizen journalists, activists are attempting to use algorithms to accurately map out the death toll in Syria, creating tools such as Syria Tracker, according to Popsci.

Reuters reports that Belgian start-up Paycento has developed a one-click payment system linked to Facebook and Twitter accounts. Users will be able to purchase single articles without having to enter credit card information each time, according to the article.

The Columbia Tribune released a new web-based iPad app that uses HTML5 technology, so users can access the app directly through the website, Editor and Publisher reported.

According to JimRomenesko.com, The Washington Post is forming a syndication service which merges The Washington Post Writers Group and The Washington Post News Service with Bloomberg News.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-03 17:20

Women's Wear Daily examines the "cult of the brand": how magazine editors are becoming more and more focused on expanding their brands into other business markets while trying to maintain editorial excellence.

NYU recently released a list of "The 100 Outstanding Journalists in the United States in the last 100 Years," according to Poynter. See if your favorites made the cut here.

AllThingsD reported that Yahoo plans to lay off thousands of employees next week, most likely within the product, marketing, and research sectors of the company.

Bloomberg and Reuters are positioned to dominate in the news industry due to their gains in subscriber revenue and increased staff numbers, AdWeek suggests.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-02 17:04

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