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Mon - 20.11.2017


Journalism

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The Christian Science Monitor, which switched its main emphasis from print to online three years ago, is aiming to be self-sufficient by 2017, and its editor, John Yemma, tells Poynter's Rick Edmonds that "he expects to get there ahead of schedule."

In the context of the British inquiry into the press, the Guardian reported that Lord Justice Leveson has indicated that the second part of the Leveson inquiry, which was due to investigate the extent of crimes committed at News International and other media organisations, may not go ahead.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-05-03 16:51

All Things D reports that revenues have dropped over the last three months at Time Inc., the biggest magazine publisher in the world. According to the article, operating income fell by 38% and revenue shrank by 3% last quarter.

Citizen photo wire Demotix is partnering with Storyful to create a “real-time social newswire,” reports Journalism.co.uk. The article quotes the official press release, which states that Demotix content will be "delivered through a dedicated channel on the StoryfulPro platform". The feed will feature content that has been verified by Storyful alongside rights-cleared images from Demotix.

In the UK, the high court has ruled that, for a product to be defined as a “newspaper”, it must contain news, but it does not have to be paper. According to Press Gazette, two judges who were deciding the case of an individual accused of illegal street trading, found that a publication does not have to be a specific shape or size to be defined as a newspaper.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-02 17:50

The Columbia Journalism Review has published a report on systems for self-regulation of the press in Scandinavia, concluding that “the Scandinavian press council model is healthy, effective, and held in high regard” as asking whether it could be applied in other countries. 

Mathew Ingram at GigaOm uses Reuter’s blogger Felix Salmon’s recent suggestion that The New York Times could sell early access to its scoops as a jumping off point to ask what the purpose of a newspaper is in the digital age. “Is private access in conflict with the public interest?” he asks.

The BBC is facing increasing threat of strike action, which will coincide with the Queen's diamond jubilee celebrations, as a result of a pay dispute, writes the Guardian. The paper reports that, union representatives have called the 1% annual pay offer made by BBC managers “derisory.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-30 16:08

A recent study from the University of Texas suggests that trying to determine who will pay for news online is more complex than finding out what sort of news is popular, reports Nieman Lab. The article explains that, confusingly, “consumers don’t always use what they prefer, and they’re not always willing to spend money on what they use.”

In the wake of Rupert Murdoch’s appearance before the Leveson inquiry, Jeff Sonderman at Poynter summarises a debate about whether constant live-tweeting of important events helps or hinders journalism.

PBS Mediashift has published an article arguing that news companies can benefit from frictionless sharing, but that it often rubs users the wrong way.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-27 17:40

The Guardian reports that Honduran television presenter Noel Alexander Valladares was killed by gunfire, along with his brother and bodyguard. Valladares is the third journalist killed in Honduras this year alone.

According to Mail & Guardian Online, the Press Freedom Commission in South Africa has released a set of recommendations for new regulations of the press, including hierarchical penalties for "journalistic infractions." The report, which is the product of eight months of research, also proposes a system of "independent co-regulation" of the press, the article says.

Vogue's controversial article about the wife of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad is no longer accessible on the internet, The Washington Post reports. The profile, which placed Asma al-Assad in a glamorous light just before her husband's regime began attacking its own citizens, garned a great deal of criticism when it was published.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-26 17:30

Many people see tech giants as the death of journalism. For one thing, they suck up much of the ad revenue that used to go to newspapers. For another, they make users accustomed to being given content for free. But rather than killing the news, are big digital players like Google simply forcing it to be reinvented?

This is what Robert Andrews suggests in an article, published today by paidContent, which covers a meeting of Paley Center’s international council of media executives in Madrid. Andrews quotes the head of news products and Google+ programming at Google, Richard Gingras, and Facebook’s journalism manager Vadim Lavrusik, who both presented the media executives with ways that journalism would be reformed with technology.

Among the points that Gingras made, was that technology was upending the traditional story form. “There will be a day – and it should not be far from now – where we can create persistent forms of stories not written in narrative form but in (Google) Fusion Tables and query strings, status updates and tweets,” said Gingras, quoted by Andrews.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-26 16:42

In light of Rupert Murdoch's testimony for the Leveson Inquiry today, Mashable examined how three news organizations, The Guardian, Pro Publica, and BBC, have been using digital technology to report on the investigation into the News of the World hacking scandal. Some of the tools used include interactive timelines and live broadcasts of the trial.

Poynter reports that The McClatchy Co. lost $2.1 million in its first quarter, a loss in revenue of 5.1%.  Advertising revenue also fell 6.8%, the article said.

Bradley Manning, the alleged WikiLeaks source, is contending that the case against him should be dropped due to the government's witholding of evidence, Reuters reported. If convicted, Manning may be sentenced to life in prison for leaking classified US documents.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-25 16:55

The Financial Times HTML5 app has reached more than 2 million users after launching 10 months ago, The Guardian reported. The web app, which users can access on a tablet internet browser, was created to bypass Apple's policies regarding subscriber information garnered through native apps.

The Wall Street Journal launched a new platform for on-the-go readers which allows for continuous streaming of data, according to Nieman Journalism Lab. The platform, called Markets Pulse, will feature a combination of articles, tweets, photos, and videos related to financial markets.

Poynter discusses eight tactics that news organizations can use to reach young readers, including hiring more young people who better reflect the targeted audience and being careful not to alienate young readers with strong paywalls. Read the rest of the strategies here. 

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 16:38

The Sun's royal editor was arrested this morning as part of Scotland Yard's investigations into corrupt payments made by journalists to police and public officials, reports Press Gazette. The publication states that the arrests were made based on evidence provided by the controversial Management and Standards Committee, which was set up by News Corp to investigate allegations of wrong-doing in the wake of the News of the World phone-hacking scandal.

Also according to Press Gazette, Google is funding a project intended to help news entrepreneurs in Europe get ahead in the industry. The University of Lancaster’s Media and Digital Enterprise initiative (MADE) is now accepting applicants for a weekend of intensive media classes for 30 aspiring news entrepreneurs.

Jim Romenesko has published a list of the total pay received by executives at nine different US newspaper companies in 2011. The sums range between $2.9 million and $25 million, and at some companies rose by over 35%.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-19 17:45

Social networks are the new hotspots for breaking news: Mashable highlights a new infographic created by Schools.com that shows "how social media is replacing traditional journalism as a news source."

Politico's premium news service Politico Pro is popular among American policy makers, Nieman Journalism Lab reports. Politico Pro, launched a year ago, covers technology, energy, health care, and transportation policy, delivering essential content to mobile subscribers quickly.

GigaOm reports that in Italy a controversial former proposal, which suggested that online publications that receive complaints should have to alter their content within 48 hours or else pay a fine of €12,000, has been resurrected.

A cartoonist at The Economist has animated the publication's style guide. Journalism.co.uk has just posted the video on its website.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-18 13:44

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