Date

Sat - 23.09.2017


Journalism

The Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas reports that a journalist has been kidnapped by three armed men in the northeastern Mexican state of Sonora. Marcos Ávila covers crime for the paper El Regional de Sonora.

The European Journalism Centre has posted a video interview with Dimitri Muratov, Editor-in-Chief of the Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta, about social media’s role in investigative journalism.

Paul Egglestone, digital coordinator at the University of Central Lancashire's School of Journalism, writes in a blog post for the BBC College of Journalism that his department is developing a new platform for community news, which fuses newsprint and digital technology.

Press Gazette reports that Johnston Press is preparing to switch two of its broadsheet weeklies to tabloid format later this month.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-18 17:55

Gawker Media’s director of editorial operations Scott Kidder was not impressed when Adweek’s website prompted him to share a story before he had read it. Is there anything more desperate a publisher can do? Gross,” he wrote on his blog. But Nieman Lab now explains that this request to share the story was the result of a bug with Google Consumer Surveys, rather than a policy by AdWeek.

Nieman Lab also reports that MTV has partnered with a group of news organisations to create a news game, intended to interest young people in the upcoming US presidential elections. MTV has launched a beta version of the game, named Fantasy Election ’12, with the help of a grant from Knight Foundation, says the article.

The Washington Post’s Erik Wemple compares the way that different news outlets retracted a bogus story about a jilted dentist in Poland pulling out her ex-boyfriend’s teeth. He ranks the results from most to least transparent.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-16 16:03

Olympic athletes are not the only ones making ambitions preparations for this summer’s games. The BBC outlined its plans for covering the Olympics in a statement yesterday, promising to provide 2,500 hours of live Olympic coverage, up from the 1,500 hours that the BBC produced at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

“We will be bringing live coverage of every Olympic Sport from every venue, both through a combination of BBC One and BBC Three and up to 24 simultaneous streams live online on PC, mobile, tablet or connected TV. These services will be complemented by coverage on Radio 5 live, mobile and tablet, while the majority of cable and satellite viewers will be able to access the 24 channels on their providers’ platform through the BBC Red Button,” said Roger Mosey, BBC director of London 2012.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-16 14:59

Former News International CEO and News of the World editor Rebekah Brooks is to be charged with three counts of conspiracy to pervert the course of justice. The Guardian reports that Brooks is one of six individuals who will be charged over allegations that they tried to hide documents and computers from police officers who were investigating phone hacking.

The Huffington Post, CNN and Mediaite all reported on a Tweet sent from a account in the name of North Carolina Governor Bev Perdue, without realising that it was a spoof, reports Poynter. The article links to Poynter’s own advice on best practices for verifying information from social media.

Mathew Ingram argues in an article for GigaOm that Twitter is edging closer to becoming a media company, after it announced on Monday that it will be launching a weekly curated email, and released a job advert last week for the role of “sports producer.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-15 15:46

Have front covers lost their edge? As more and more news migrates online, it would be easy to think they might have.

When it comes to online news, not only is there no fixed “front cover” on most newspaper websites - which are updated throughout the day. The news that goes on a newspaper’s homepage is also not necessarily what pulls in the audience.

“Seventy-five percent of uniques are coming from external sources, only 25 percent are coming to the homepage,” said Google’s head of news products Richard Gingras, in a recent discussion about online journalism at the Paley Center’s international council of media executives, quoted by paidContent

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-14 17:42

The Globe and Mail, one of Canada’s biggest newspapers, is erecting a metered paywall in the style of the New York Times in an attempt to boost revenue, reports Reuters. The article also mentions that the paper’s staff is being asked to take unpaid holiday over the summer, in order to cut costs.

Former News of the World editor and News International CEO Rebekah Brooks appeared before the Leveson Inquiry today. The Guardian has comprehensive coverage on its blog.

Andrew Beaujon at Poynter discuses Time’s controversial cover featuring a young mother breast-feeding her son, who is almost four years old. Beaujon argues that the image has stimulated the “conversation” that newsweeklies are looking for.

An article in Nieman Lab examines how Internet memes are used as a form of dissent in China.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-11 17:57

Journalism.co.uk reports that News Corp has seen its net profit jump by 47% for the first three months of 2012, compared to the same period the previous year, in spite of having spent $167m on its legal response to the phone hacking scandal. Although the company saw its total operating profit grow by 23% year-on-year, operating profit at the company’s publishing division fell by 19%, says the article.

The publisher of Mail Online, Martin Clarke, has appeared before the Leveson inquiry and has warned that over-regulation would damage the UK newspaper business, writes Press Gazette. “If we don’t allow UK newspapers to compete effectively in this online world then we aren’t going to have much of an industry left to regulate,” said Clarke, according to the article.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-10 12:55

Social media giveth, and social media taketh away… When Facebook launched its "frictionless sharing" social reader apps last September in partnership with news organisations including The Guardian, The Independent and The Washington Post, many in the media business hailed it as a major boost for the industry. Now, however, the number of people using social news reader apps has taken a plunge, after changes implemented by Facebook.

Just over one month after the social reader’s launch, Facebook announced that The Guardian app had been installed nearly 4 million times, and had pushed up page impressions by around 1 million every day. According to Facebook, The Washington Post’s app gained 3.5 million active monthly users in its first month, and 83% of its users were under 35.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-09 17:06

The Columbian rebel group Farc has announced that they have captured Romeo Langlois, the French journalist who went missing a week ago, reports The Guardian. According to the paper, a Farc representative said that Langlois had been lightly wounded on the arm, but was not critically ill.

An article in the Columbia Journalism Review about a filmmaker who accidentally exposed the details of his sources to Syrian intelligence sources suggests that many journalists still don’t understand how to protect their communication properly in the digital age.

Online journalists can often feel under pressure to produce huge amounts of content, to be published instantly. One consequence can be that copy errors slip through the net. To combat these problems, Poynter has suggested six ways that journalists can clean up their articles.

For anyone looking for some good news, Say Daily has published a list of six ways that digital publishing is getting better.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-07 17:09

Trinity Mirror chief executive Sly Bailey has stepped down after growing anger from shareholders about her £1.7m pay package, reports The Guardian. The article notes that in March the publisher posted a 40% drop in pre-tax profits for 2011 and that Trinity Mirror’s share price has fallen by 90% since Bailey became CEO in 2002.

Somali journalist Farhan Jeemis Abdulle was shot and killed on Wednesday, as he was walking home from the private radio station where he worked, writes CPJ. According to the article, Abdulle’s colleagues said he had received anonymous threats a few days before he was killed.

Arianna Huffington’s role at AOL has been reduced, according to an article in The Hollywood Reporter. After AOL bought the HuffPo, Huffington was put in charge of all the company’s editorial operations. But speaking at Business Insider’s Start-up 2012 conference yesterday, Huffington said she has now asked, “to be freed up to just concentrate exclusively on HuffPost,” states the article.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-04 16:12

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