Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Internet

Physical construction may be down across the Western World, but there's a boom in paywalls.

At least 150 paywalls have been erected over the last year or so, in the U.S., U.K., and across Europe. American companies in on that construction boom include Lee, McClatchy, Morris, MediaGeneral, MediaNews, Gatehouse, and Tribune (all powered by Press+), as well as Scripps, Gannett, and Belo. From Sanoma in Finland to The Telegraph in the U.K., a number of dailies are following the trend. Those that haven't are almost all considering a paywall in some form; many more will launch in the next 12 months.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-27 09:40

Last week journalism professor Matt Waite wrote a blog post worrying about the typical defeatist reaction of journalism students when faced with a coding challenge, whether in HTML, JavaScript, or other language: "I can't do this," they tell him. "This is impossible. I'll never get this." When I tweeted a link to the article, I wrote ""Journos: If you fear coding, you fear the future."

That prompted a response from a practicing trade journalist and former colleague, who asked "I can see why knowing things like HTML and CSS can be helpful but do most journos need more than that?"

Continue reading on B2B Memes

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-27 09:30

by Mallary Jean Tenore

Social networks have helped make journalists more accessible by breaking down barriers between the public and the media. But there's a disconnect between journalists' accessibility on social networks and their accessibility on news sites.

As a media reporter, I've often been frustrated by how hard I have to look for journalists' contact information on news sites -- and by how few usable results I get. I sometimes find nothing more than a generic email address, or a list of emails for departments instead of people.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-26 10:54

by Roy Greenslade

Should a local newspaper have its office in the centre of the town, city or borough where it circulates? In an ideal (aka former) world, yes.

Should a local council advertise all its public notices, planning applications and job recruitment opportunities in the local paper (or papers)? In an ideal (aka former) world, yes.

Clearly, by qualifying the "ideal" with "former", my questions are loaded.

Continue reading on Greenslade Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-26 10:06

Many newspapers and other traditional media entities still think of themselves as delivering their content in a specific package, although most are trying hard to build an online readership as well, or experiment with iPad and Facebook apps (not to mention paywalls). But few are thinking about their businesses in radically different ways -- as content-generating engines with multiple delivery methods, or as platforms for data, around which other things can be built. USA Today appears to be moving in this direction, by opening up its data for others to use and even commercialize, following in the footsteps of The Guardian and its ground-breaking "open platform."

Continue reading on GigaOm

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 17:36

by Jeff Sonderman

A couple weeks ago I predicted that Apple's virtual Newsstand for iPads and iPhones would provide "a little more convenience for the user, and a little more discoverability for the publisher -- but nothing here is a game-changer."

I stand by the first part of that diagnosis, but it's now clear there is something game-changing about Newsstand. Since Apple launched it last week in the latest version of its iOS operating system, its impact has been immediate and significant. Many Newsstand apps now rank among the top free apps overall, and magazine and newspaper apps are benefiting from a surge of downloads and subscribers.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 17:22

Orlando, Fla., October 18, 2011-- Gartner, Inc. today highlighted the top 10 technologies and trends that will be strategic for most organizations in 2012. The analysts presented their findings during Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, being held here through October 20.

Gartner defines a strategic technology as one with the potential for significant impact on the enterprise in the next three years. Factors that denote significant impact include a high potential for disruption to IT or the business, the need for a major dollar investment, or the risk of being late to adopt.

A strategic technology may be an existing technology that has matured and/or become suitable for a wider range of uses. It may also be an emerging technology that offers an opportunity for strategic business advantage for early adopters or with potential for significant market disruption in the next five years. These technologies impact the organization's long-term plans, programs and initiatives.

Continue reading in the Gartner Newsroom

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 10:31

by Dean Roper

Béla Papp, publishing director of Ringier Studios, owned by international publisher Ringier in Switzerland, describes how this new venture aims to build up a client base and a new revenue stream.

The company is focusing on developing apps for iPad and Android tablets with the clear goal of "being a leading app provider," says Papp during a World Editors Forum session focusing on tablet publishing.

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 10:22

by Dean Roper

"When we decided to put our content behind the wall, our newsroom was horrified," says Dirk Nolde, managing editor of the Berliner Morgenpost, during Saturday's World Editors Forum session on paywalls.

"Fortunately," he says, "our readers are indeed willing to pay, and we think it is because they believe there is quality content and it is OK to pay for that."

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-21 09:39

by Alexandra Waldhorn

When the New York Times first erected a paywall - as a possible cure for slipping profits - Assistant Managing Editor Jim Roberts says he was wary.

"I was one of the few in the newsroom who thought it was a bad idea. I was really worried that our audience, which we had worked so hard to attract, would shrink," Roberts says during the World Editors Forum session, "Paywalls, from the newsroom perspective."

He was especially concerned that the younger audience, often attracted through social media, would flee. Advertising would follow suit, he thought - if the readership shrunk, so would advertising.

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-21 09:28

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