Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Internet

Today Wikipedia has blacked out its English language pages in protest again the proposed anti-piracy legislation in the US, which it says could "fatally damage the free and open Internet."

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP Act (PIPA) bills that have caused the controversy are intended to stop the infringement of US copyright material by overseas websites. If passed, SOPA would give the US Justice Department and copyright holders the power to seek court orders to block search engine results or websites linking to pirated material. PIPA, due to come before the Senate on January 24th, proposes similar measures.

Wikipedia objects that the proposed laws will block entire sites unnecessarily and place the onus on site owners to police the material they link to, with damaging consequences:

"Small sites won't have sufficient resources to defend themselves. Big media companies may seek to cut off funding sources for their foreign competitors, even if copyright isn't being infringed. Foreign sites will be blacklisted, which means they won't show up in major search engines. And, SOPA and PIPA build a framework for future restrictions and suppression."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-18 15:55

As the Republican primaries heat up in the US, news organizations everywhere are trying to predict the winner. But while none of them have a crystal ball, Politico does have a new source of knowledge at its disposal: Facebook.

Last Thursday Politico and Facebook announced they were partnering up to measure user opinion of Republican candidates. A Facebook data team is using an automated process to measure how often users are mentioning, sharing and linking to GOP candidates and whether these mentions are positive or negative. The results are handed onto Politico, whose journalists analyse and publish them. The first set of data is already out.

The project has been greeted by many as great opportunity to paint a detailed picture of voter opinion. Mashable writes that the vast number of Facebook users and the huge amount of information that Facebook holds on them means that the social network "can become a unique space to conduct survey-based research". Read Write Web writes that "Facebook could be the biggest, most dynamic census of human opinion and interaction in history".

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-16 18:01

Google searchers who use Google+ will start seeing content from the social network in their search results, Google announced yesterday. Users will now be able to see information shared with them on Google+ in their search results along with Google+ profiles and pages related to their areas of interest. Picasa photos will also be integrated into results.

"We're transforming Google into a search engine that understands not only content, but also people and relationships" says Google Fellow Amit Singhal in a blog post. The new move is described by the company as "Search, plus Your World."

To read the rest of this article please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.com

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-11 18:22

When AOL bought the Patch network of hyperlocal news sites in 2009, it made a gamble. Towards the end of 2011, it looked like that gamble was not paying off, or at least not as quickly as the internet giant had hoped.

However, according to a press release published today, the number of unique visitors to Patch sites has more than tripled between December 2010 and December 2011.

Business Insider reported last month that it estimated the hyperlocal network had lost about $100 million over the last year. This was despite Patch's target for its first sites to reach profitability by the end of 2011. While a Patch spokeswoman flatly denied Business Insider's figure, reductions to Patch sites' freelance budget last October and the fact that the company was encouraging its editors to work more closely with sales people could be see as a sign that the hyperlocal network was coming under financial pressure, even though Patch President Warren Webster insisted that the changes were not driven by financial conditions.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-11 17:59

A piece of music sounds normally sounds better when all the parts are played together. And Slovakian start-up Piano Media argues that, when it comes to paywalls, news publications are also better off when their strategies work in harmony.

Piano Media, founded in May 2011 by Tomáš Bella, former editor-in-chief of SME Online, the digital division of Slovakia's largest newspaper, has persuaded most of Slovakia's major media outlets to sign up to a single-payment system. This means that the country's major news sites share a paywall, and split the revenue between themselves - 40% goes to the news site where the reader bought his or her Piano subscription, 30% goes to the site where a reader is spending his or her time online and 30% goes to Piano Media itself. Its system makes the users' experiences easier by offering a simple pay plan and by reducing the feeling that readers are paying one company for content that they could get for free elsewhere.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-10 10:56

Here are 10 things every journalists should know in 2012. This list builds on 10 things every journalist should know in 2009 and 2010. It is worth looking back at the previous posts as the ideas are still relevant today.

1. Learn from Leveson. The Leveson inquiry into the culture, practices and ethics of the media has specifically scrutinised journalism and the industry, but social media (and therefore popular opinion) is also holding it to account.

Continue reading on journalism.co.uk

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-01-06 11:18

This may be the year where newspapers finally drop the idea of treating all news as a product, and all readers as customers.

One early sign of this shift was the 2010 launch of paywalls for the London Times and Sunday Times. These involved no new strategy; however, the newspaper world was finally willing to regard them as real test of whether general-interest papers could induce a critical mass of readers to pay. (Nope.)

Continue reading on Clay Shirky

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-01-06 11:13

by Sara-Ellen Amster

As I watched the latest Spielberg movie this week with my wide-eyed 7-year-old son, I could not help thinking that the brave new world of journalism, both virtual and real, still holds cosmic power for millions of young people.

This dream is shared by Tintin, the intrepid boy reporter whose never-say-quit gumption keeps him digging deeper for the truth even when all hope appears lost. Heroes Tintin and his dog Snowy must find three puzzle pieces to uncover a buried treasure. The fantastical story was adapted from the work of Belgian artist Georges Rémi, who had the pen name Herge.

Continue reading in the Huffington Post

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-01-05 10:42

Marketing is a vital aspect of a thriving business. As such, the newspaper industry as a whole could benefit from a marketing revival. Traditional marketing tactics may have served the industry well in the past, but the biggest areas of growth are in online and interactive marketing. According to the Forrester Research Interactive Marketing Forecast 2011 to 2016 (U.S.), interactive marketing currently represents 21 percent of ad spend (2012) and will grow to 35 percent of ad spend by 2016. And by 2016, advertisers will spend nearly $77 billion on interactive marketing.

Continue reading in Editor & Publisher

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-01-05 09:55

by Bobbie Johnson

As the year comes to a close, the media is stuffed with pundits proclaiming that 2011 was the year of something or other. For the most part, it's easy to ignore these trend pieces: Many of them are simply chum thrown in the water to attract readers over a quiet period while giving journalists a chance to take a breather.

Still, there are a few claims that caught my eye. One in particular was Mashable's assertation that 2011 was "the year the paywall worked." More particularly, it argued that the New York Times and the Minneapolis Star-Tribune had set a path for others to follow by making money out of paywalled stories:

Continue reading on Giga OM

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-01-04 09:55

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