Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Industry Trends

Ad sales for most newspaper publishers in U.S. were less bad in the second quarter of this year, compared to the previous quarter.

However, "less bad is not the same as good," according to the Business Insider, which pointed out that the outlook for the rest of the year is "decidedly murky".

According to the financial results reported to date by the publicly traded publishing companies, the average sales for the industry in the second quarter will drop about 7 percent to 8 percent, making it the least decline since the fall of 2007, Reflections of a Newsosaur reported.

In addition, this period will be an improvement from the 9.7 percent industry decrease in print and online sales in the first quarter, and from the 29 percent sales plunge year-over-year.

Among the seven publicly traded U.S. publishers who have already released second-quarter results, six of them reported better quarterly sales except for A.H. Belo. The strongest performer was the New York Times.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-02 20:31

Internet users's dependence on print media as a primary source of information continues to drop, according to a recent study released by the Center for Digital Future at USC's Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, LA Weekly reported on its blog.

According to the results, only 56 percent of those surveyed view print news as a valuable source of information. This was down from 60 percent when the survey was conducted in 2008. More people relied on the internet (78 percent) and television (68 percent) as their main news source.

The study found that only 56 percent of online users think newspapers as a valuable source of information, which decreased 4 percent since 2008.

More people, however, relied on the Web (78 percent) and TV (68 percent) as their main source for news.

When asked what they would do if the home newspaper folded and went online, only 59 percent of respondents said they would read it on online... for free, the Franklin Center for Government & Public Integrity reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-30 20:49

Mobile content revenues in Japan are expected to reach about US$5.3 billion in 2011, up 14 percent from $4.6 billion in 2008, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Mobile advertising will generate about $1.3 billion in 2011, which increased 73 percent from $743 million in 2008, according to Mobile Content Forum, Dentsu and Infinita.

Mobile social networking revenues are expected to reach $863 million in 2011, which surged 232 percent from $260 million in 2008, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-22 04:12

The gaming market is no longer the privilege of console games, while online games are getting popular, according to a recent survey conducted by Blockdot, a firm specialised at Interactive Entertainment and Advergaming technologies.


The study, conducted in the spring of 2010 for the third consecutive year, targeted 500 game players on Kewlbox.com.

The study found that on average, online game engagement can last from five to 45 minutes per user session.

Traditional board games are still one of the most popular gaming genres - 88 percent of females and 80 percent of males said they had a positive intent to play these games.

Among female players, puzzle games remain extremely popular, while action-puzzle games gained popularity for both genders.

A dramatic shift in gaming preferences since 2008 goes to first-person shooter games - it was once very popular among males, but dropped 20 percent in positive intent to play, and there is 70 percent increase in negative intent.

Although multi-player games are gaining attention, over nine out of 10 respondents still prefer single-player game play.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-20 23:08

Newspaper publishers have found that onetime cost cuts are not enough to streamline their businesses for the future. Instead, lowering costs must be done as part of a long-term business strategy; and for many companies, part of that strategy includes outsourcing, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

Saving money through outsourcing and/or offshoring has grown in popularity because it is not a one-time fix to help numbers on a current earnings report, but rather it is part of a plan for the future.

According to the 2010 World Newspaper Future & Change Study, 17 percent of the 500 newspaper executive respondents said they plan to outsource functions in their newspaper company to achieve greater efficiency and cost savings in the next year.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-12 23:10

According to the new study "Mobile Access 2010," released by Pew Internet & American Life Project, in April 2010, 38 percent of U.S. mobile device owner surf the Internet using their mobile devices, up from 25 percent year-over-year, Media Post reported.

As 82 percent of U.S. adult population has a mobile device, this means that about 31 percent of all U.S. adults access mobile Internet in 2010, Pew reported.

In terms of e-commerce, the study also found that 11 percent of U.S. mobile device owners, or 9 percent of the adult population at large, have ever purchased using the mobile Internet. The age group between 18 to 29 years old has the highest percentage, which is 20 percent. To divide it by ethnic groups, 18 percent of English-speaking Hispanics and 13 percent of African-American consumers have ever tried e-commerce on a mobile device, while only 10 percent for the non-Hispanic white population has ever done so.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-10 01:45

Since 2008, more than 166 newspapers in the United States have closed down or stopped publishing a print edition, according to Paper Cuts, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

More than 39 titles did so in 2008, and the number rose to 109 in 2009. So far in 2010, more than 18 papers have closed down or stopped publishing a print version.

According to Paper Cuts, there have been nearly 35,000 job losses or buyouts in the U.S. newspaper industry since March 2007. From March to December 2007, more than 2,256 newspaper jobs have been reportedly eliminated or offered buyouts.

The numbers increased to more than 15,992 in 2008 and were at more than 14,783 in 2009. As of May 2010, there have been more than 1,797 job losses or buyouts in newspaper companies in the country, according to the report, Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-05 20:25

Compared to some parts of the world, the U.S. journalism market has experienced a more severe downturn. According to the American Society of News Editors, the country's newsroom workforce grew from about 45,000 in 1978 to more than 55,000 in 1989, but has been in a general state of decline since then. In 2006, the journalism workforce totalled about 55,000, but dropped to less than 50,000 within the next two years, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

According to the Amerian Society for Newspaper Edtiors census for 2009, a total of 5,200 newsroom professional jobs were cut, not as high as the 5,900 in 2008. Online-only newspapers also cut 284 jobs in 2009. This caused newsroom employment to drop to 41,500, from 56,400 in 2000. The percentage of losses are higher at big metros and lower at smaller titles, according to "The State of the News Media 2010," a report by The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism.

According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor, the number of jobs at newspaper publishing companies in the country has plunged from more than 450,000 in July 1990 to about 300,000 in July 2009. The decline began accelerating after 2001.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-02 17:16

1seg is a mobile terrestrial broadcasting service offering digital audio/video and data in Japan and Brazil. The service was introduced experimentally in 2005 and commercially launched on April 2006 in Japan. In Brazil, it began in late 2007 in a few selected cities. The first mobile phone handsets for 1seg were on the market in autumn 2005 in Japan, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

According to data from JEITA and NTT DoCoMo, there was only a small number of 1seg-enabled mobile phone handsets in March 2006, but in December 2007, that number reached 20 million in Japan.

According to CIAJ and MMRI, in Japan an average user consumes 1seg 6.1 times per week, with peak use at 11.7 times. A user views mobile TV for about 47 minutes on average per week, while three out of four of those sessions lasting less than 10 minutes each.

The viewing peak time is on weekdays is between 9 p.m. to 12 a.m. Weekend usage is much lower than weekdays.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-26 00:36

Digital technology not only creates e-waste, but also uses energy when devices are not turned off, and in many cases, unplugged. However, the good news is that better technology today means more efficient energy use. Today's personal computers, and especially laptops, use substantially less energy use when using them for reading, according to a 2009 report by the KTH Centre for Sustainable Communications, "Screening environmental life cycle assessment of printed, web based and tablet epaper newspaper."

The average PC and LCD screens on the market in 2005 used 110 watts in idle mode, and laptops used 32 watts, according to the report. A modem adds an additional nine watts, SFN's Going Green reported.

In Sweden, where the report was created and where digital usage is high compared to the worldwide average, the average household of two people use the Internet about 160 minutes per day. However, because equipment that is not turned off when not in use also uses energy, the non-active time is 1,280 minutes per day.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-15 22:56

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