Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Financials

UK publisher Trinity Mirror announced that it is finalising plans for its upcoming paywalls on mirror.co.uk (The Daily Mirror) and sundaymirror.co.uk (The Sunday Mirror), Brand Republic reported today. According to Marketing, the concluded plans will be available by the end of the year.

"Our view is that people will not pay for ubiquitous content that is free elsewhere. But there may be a willingness to pay for unique, high-value content," said Mark Hollinshead, the managing director for the group's nationals, Brand Republic reported.

The Daily mirror's general news will remain free while content from columnists (such as political journalist Paul Routledge or sports writer Oliver Holt) will constitute the paid-for initiative. According to MarketingWeek.co.uk, the publisher will be appealing to loyal audiences through social gaming. Trinity Mirror also has a mobile app for its sports feature Mirror Football, which comes with a £1.19 (US$1.87 or €1.35) download price tag, MarketingWeek.co.uk pointed out.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-19 16:39

Google announced a 32 percent increase in net income during the third quarter of the fiscal year, reaching US$2.17 billion, Market Watch revealed today.

"It's clear the digital economy continues to grow rapidly, a relentless trend that continues to drive continued growth in our core business ... and also fuel our momentum in our newer businesses," said Patrick Pichette (left), Google's chief financial officer, Investors.com wrote."We saw strength in every major product area in Q3 -- that is search, display, mobile -- as well as apps and enterprise. And when I say our newer businesses are seeing great momentum, I really mean it."

Image: Financial Post

The same time last year, Google reported a net income of $1.64 billion, according to Market Watch. Meanwhile, revenues hiked up by 23 percent from $5.94 billion to $7.29 billion year-on-year, Economic Times informed.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-15 21:58

Shares of Gannett Co. Inc plunged 8.02 percent today to $12.96, after its quarterly revenue fell short of expectations for the biggest U.S. newspaper chain, AFP reported.

The company's net profit in the third quarter was up 37.5 percent to $101.4 million compared to the same period a year ago.

Revenue, however, remained flat at $1.31 billion, which was short of the Wall Street expectation's $1.32 billion.

The publishing unit had its revenue down almost 5 percent to $969.4 million, including a 5-percent decline in advertising revenue to $646.7 million, Reuters reported.

Broadcasting revenue, on the other hand, gained 22.3 percent to $185.3 million, with digital revenue up 10.2 percent to $157.7 million.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-10-15 21:51

The New Revenue and New Channel Innovations study tour will take place from Sunday, 7 November to Friday, 12 November 2010 in Silicon Valley, California, United States.

New revenue development is the hottest topic among media executives today, according to the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project's 2010 World News Future & Change Study. Participants will learn about new revenue and channel opportunities such as:
- online, video and mobile advertising
- paid content online
- audience development and high-yield revenue-making
- new product development, and much more.

We will visit both new media and traditional companies, including: Google, Yahoo!, Hewlett Packard, Stanford University, Nokia, and more.

Visit the study tour sign-up page for more information.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-14 22:17

Shares of New York Times Co. was up more than 9 percent Monday, one of the biggest gainers on the New York Stock Exchange, after UBS released a note citing advertising growth at the publication, the Global and Mail reported.

The stock boosted to $8.77, a two-month high, before trading up 63 cents, or 7.9 percent, at $8.65.

According to UBS analyst John Janedis, who gave a "sell" recommendation on the stock, said that the number of ads in the paper is 4 percent ahead of last year so far in October, Editor and Publisher reported.

There was no comment available yet from the New York Times Co.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-10-12 17:43

The price war led by Richard Desmond to attract more readers to the Daily Star reduced the revenue of his newspaper publishing division, Express Newspapers, by £52.2 million for a total of £211 million in 2009, The Financial Times reported today.

Although the move increased the Daily Star's circulation in the United Kingdom from 809,992 in June to 862,005 in August, the company reported last year a pre-tax loss of £15.6 million. According to Media Week, the cost of money-off vouchers to lower the price of the paper cost £52.2 million.

Photo source: BBC
"The largest single factor which affected the financial performance of [Express Newspapers] in the year arose from the furtherance of the group's policy to ensure that its main products were the most competitively priced in each of its market segments," said the publishing group in a statement, The Financial Times quoted.

Desmond dropped the Daily Star's price in July from 20p to 10p in order to attract readers from The Sun and the Daily Mirror, Media Week reminded. However, the paper returned to its full cover price this week.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-08 23:56

New York Times Company CEO Janet Robinson spoke to the Editors Weblog about The New York Times' upcoming paywall:

More videos can be found here http://www.youtube.com/user/WEFHamburg

For more coverage of the 17th World Editors Forum in Hamburg, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org, follow our Twitter feed @NewspaperWorld (#WEFHamburg) and visit the European Journalism Centre, which is live-streaming a selection of sessions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-08 21:23

City A.M., London's free daily newspaper, reported profits for the first time in 18 months due to a 39 percent increase in advertising revenue during the first six months of the year, Marketing Week revealed today.

The newspaper's made a operating profit of £546,000 compared with a £302,000 operating loss during the same period in 2008, The Guardian pointed out. Overall, the company reported pre-tax profits of £423,000 while last year it had £419,000 of pre-tax loss.

"After 18 difficult months for all media we are now back on the growth rate we had before the financial crisis," said City AM chief executive Jens Torpe, Press Gazette quoted. "We are confident we can maintain this positive trend and are therefore increasing the circulation this autumn by adding some 30 to 40 new stations in the commuter belt."

The company also revealed that in 2009 total losses reached £773,000, and that it still has to regained £8m million from total net investment and losses. Currently, City A.M. had a daily circulation of 100,000 copies.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-06 23:40

During the 17th World Editors Forum, the results of the Future & Change study, conducted by the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project, the Norwegian School of Management and the University of Central Lancashire were presented by project director Martha Stone and Dr. Erik Wilberg, associate professor from the Norwegian School of Management. "How to recover the revenue loss that newspapers suffered in the last years lies at the heart of the SFN study," Stone. said

The study investigates how editors and publishers deal with changes taking place in the newspaper business and explores new ways of revenue generation. It also showed that key issues for the newspaper business are finding new revenue model opportunities, a stronger focus on targeted publications and the increase of independence from advertising. Concrete plans to increase revenue was mentioned by respondents, among them more than 45 percent from the top management level. They also indicated wanting a stronger emphasis on businesses outside of newspapers, such as Internet services, other print products, all-advertising newspapers and distribution services.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-06 19:04

The U.S. Postal Service will begin checking on whether a newspaper is "droopy," The Associated Press reported. "Under a rule that takes affect Sunday, if a flat piece of mail that's longer than 10 inches droops too much, it will cost more to mail in bulk," the article states. The reason for this is because mail cannot be put through an automated flat sorter and "sorting by hand costs more."

This could affect a number of community newspapers that drop off editions to the post office to deliver to newspaper subscribers, as well as certain magazines, shopping circulars and other types of envelopes, the AP noted.
The postal service will subject newspapers to a "droop test," in which it will be determined if they are fit for the machine sorter. The test will involve workers at the post office placing the paper on a counter with a flat edge, with half the publication hanging off the edge. "If it droops more than three inches, it fails. No bulk discount," the AP article stated. "The non-discount rate will raise mailing costs from 5.9 cents per item to 9.9 cents, a 68 percent increase, or to 10.5 cents, a 78 percent hike, for newspapers without barcodes."

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-04 15:29

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