Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


Financials

Amazon announced on Monday that it would give publishers as much as 70 percent of the revenues it collects from selling newspapers and magazines through its Kindle store, The New York Times reported.

The royalty increase will take effect on December 1 and will be calculated on the retail price minus the delivery costs, The Associated Press reported. However, to qualify for it, "publications must be able to be read on all Kindle devices and applications built for devices such as Apple's iPhone and the Blackberry," Agence France-Presse explained.

Image: Pulse 2

"A newspaper that delivers about 9 megabytes of content a month would pay about $1.35 in delivery costs, meaning a $9.99-per-month subscription would net a publisher $6.05 a month per subscription," according to the company, the AP reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-09 17:16

Russian Facebook investor Mail.ru Group saw a 30 percent climb on the London Stock Exchange last Friday, gathering US$912 milllion, Bloomberg reported. The Initial Public Offering valued Mail.ru at $5.71 billion, which was the largest in the UK since July.

The Internet firm and its current stakeholders sold 32.9 million global depositary receipts for $27.70 each, Bloomberg revealed. However, on Friday the figures experienced a boost as they reached $37 per share, AFP informed.

Mail.ru operates Russian-language e-mail, gaming sites as well social networks, such as Odnoklassniki and VKontakte. The Wall Street Journal outlined that the company appealed to investors because they saw a chance to bet on the possible development within the country's economy as well as Mail.ru's significant market shares in strategic areas.

"This is the first issue in 2010 that has been able to place at the top of the indicated price range," said Chris Weafer, chief strategist at financial group Uralsib. "While most other IPOs have struggled in tough market conditions, Mail.Ru has certainly hit a sweet spot."

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-08 21:45

Newspapers and broadcasters in the United Kingdom are less willing to spend money on investigative journalism than ever before, causing the type of reporting newspapers have been hailed for to begin "dying a death," documentary maker Kevin Toolis told a panel at the Sheffield Doc/Fest today, MediaGuardian reported.

Investigative reporting is "disgracefully expensive," and needs more outlets willing to pay for it, David Henshaw, managing director of Hardcash Productions.

Image: SBCWorks.org

As budgets at traditional outlets get tighter, new operations have sprung up to try and fill the gap of investigative reporting.

In July, the British Bureau of Investigative Journalism published its first story, which was picked up by the British Medical Journal and Al Jazeera English, Journalism.co.uk reported at the time. The not-for-profit was launched in April, has 17 freelance and full-time staff, and is located in City University London.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-04 17:25

The publisher of the National Enquirer and Men's Fitness announced it will file for bankruptcy in order to restructure, The New York Times reported late yesterday.

New York-based American Media's debt is seven times larger than its equity. It is expected to file for a "prepackaged" 60-day bankruptcy in the next two weeks, CEO David J. Pecker said in a statement.

Image: Sun-Sentinal

Eighty percent of the company's bondholders have agreed to a debt-for-equity exchange, which is necessary for the quick "prepackaged" bankruptcy, the company believes, CNNMoney.com explained.

The move will enable the Enquirer and its related publications "to compete even more aggressively with our peers in the industry," Pecker said, according to The Australian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 16:54

At least 42 employees of the Ottawa Citizen, a former Canwest's newspaper bought by Postmedia Network in July, have accepted voluntary buyouts as part of its restructuring plan, ctvottawa.ca reported Friday.

The president of the Ottawa Newspaper Guild Lois Kirkup said that 10 editorial staffers took the offer, according to CBC News. The other 32 employees are part of the advertising, sales and finance department.

The buyouts were offered in September through out Postmedia newspapers as a way to cut costs. According to media reports, the buyout package includes six weeks' pay per year of service up to a maximum of C$150,000.

Layoffs have been reported at Edmonton Journal and the Calgary Herald. The idea, Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey said back in September, will be refocus the publications towards "the digital future," CBC News informed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-02 16:20

UK regional publisher Archant plans to make seven deputy editors posts redundant and to centralise the production of six of its north London newspapers, Press Gazette reported.

The publisher's Bethnal Green office will close and all staff will be transferred to Ilford at the end of November. This office will house a "common editorial production unit," which will lay out pages for Archant's Recorder series, the Barking and Dagenham Post, Stratford and Newham Express, East London Advertiser, Hackney Gazette, Stoke Newington Gazette and Docklands. The deputy editor posts from these papers will be made redundant, as well as one from Archant's Times series.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-29 19:28

Thomson Reuters Corp. has reported a 66 percent increase in its third quarter profit, the Wall Street Journal reported today. Profits rose to US$227 million, or 32 cents a share, from $167 million (19 cents per share) last year.

Adjusted third quarter earnings rose from 43 cents last year, to 49 cents this year, according to results posted by the news and data provider.

Tom Glocer, CEO of Thomson Reuters, said he was especially pleased with the launch and adoption rate of the company's Eikon, a desktop platform for financial professionals, launched in September. New platforms, also including Thomson Reuters Elektron and WestlawNext, as well as upcoming platforms to serve the Tax & Accounting and Healthcare & Science units, "will arm our sales force with the tools needed to drive revenue and profit growth in 2011 and beyond."

Glocer told the Financial Times of the group's finances: "It has been a story of the substitution of technology instead of headcount growth."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-28 22:06

The Associated Press' revenue from newspapers has declined by one third since 2008, from US$220 million a year to about $140 million, Poynter.org revealed yesterday. Newspapers' contribution to the wire service's revenue is now only 20 percent.

"We expect it will continue to drop another $5 million to $7 million a year" starting in 2011 and thereafter, said AP Chief Executive Officer and President Tom Curley, explaining that the company is subsidising "offerings with more profitable lines of business."

The AP is relying on areas of growth like commercial photos, software businesses and its television news feeds. "The latter part is getting some more attention, as the TV feeds will soon get a $30 million digital upgrade to its system," paidContent.org explained.

Last week, the AP announced a joint reporting project with the Associated Press Managing Editors association to increase the coverage on how cutbacks in state budgets are affecting services and people, The Washington Post revealed. The company will also introduce e-commerce and create some subscription-based products.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-28 20:37

Google Inc has given $2 million to the Knight Foundation, it was announced yesterday, and the search giant has said it will invest $3 million more in journalism projects outside the US, "through a similar partnership." More details will be available early next year, according to a post on Google's blog by Nikesh Arora, president, Global Sales Operations and Business Development.

The money to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is intended to support the foundation's digital media innovation work, and half will go to the Knight News Challenge, while the remaining $1 million will to other grants around news innovation which will be announced later.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-28 00:26

Although no official numbers have been released by Times and Sunday Times owner News International, audience research company Nielsen has estimated that an average of 362,000 UK web users went behind the papers' paywalls between July and September, reported the Guardian.

Nielsen estimates that 1.78 million monthly unique visitors from the UK went to the two papers' homepages, meaning that of these, just over one-fifth are going on to access subscription content, the Guardian added. In the three months until June 2010, the traffic to the Times Online site, predecessor to TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk, was just over 3 million.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-27 19:04

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation