Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Financials

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp bought on Monday 90 percent of Wireless Generation, a U.S. company that develops mobile and Internet educational software for teachers, Bloomberg revealed. The media group paid US$360 million in cash for the acquisition.

"We see a $500bn sector in the U.S. alone that is waiting desperately to be transformed by big breakthroughs that extend the reach of great teaching," said Murdoch, The Telegraph quoted.

According to the Financial Times, the deal will allow News Corp compete other media groups that have invested in software and education services like Pearson, which owns the FT Group.

This is the first time in almost 20 years that News Corp, which owns The Wall Street Journal and The New York Post, will "foray into the for-profit world of education since its book publishing arm, Harper Collins, got out of the textbook business in the mid-1990s," The New York Times reminded.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-25 16:48

Beginning this week ProPublica began using the Press+ e-commerce online platform from Journalism Online in hopes of increasing reader donations.

When users click on a ProPublica page, they may see a Press+ message asking them to consider making a donation to help fund the organisation's investigative journalism. At the same time, Press+ isn't the only way to donate. Users can also contribute directly to the organisation.

Journalism Online was launched in April 2009 by Steven Brill, Gordon Crovitz and Leo Hindery. It aims to create an online payment system that many publishing companies could use to make paying for online content simpler for both readers and publishers. The James S. and James L. Knight Foundation began using the Press+ system for 10 non-profit journalism sites in September

In an interview with Shaping the Future of the Newspaper last summer, Brill said that as a lecturer of a journalism course at Yale University, he suddenly became conscious of the talented young people he was sending into a profession ready to implode "because a bunch of publishers made a crazy decision to give everything away for free."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-25 16:37

Australia's Fairfax Media Ltd. will combine the print, online and classified divisions of its metropolitan newspapers under a single unit, called Australian Metropolitan Media division, in an effort to increase efficiency and cut cots in the company, The Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday.

Chief Executive Officer Brian McCarthy said the strategy aims to increase news offerings across platforms and content-sharing between its newspapers, which include The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Canberra Times.

"Such that the print product isn't as predictable if you've gone on to smh.com already the night before, so that'll be one of the things I'll be trying to achieve - a better balance of content," said McCarthy, ABC News quoted.

However, no one has been appointed yet to run the new unit, which reduced Fairfax's divisions from eleven to nine and is expected to save $9.9 million. According to The Australian, the new position will "be fiercely contested," pointing out that some of the candidates include editor-in-chief of The Sidney Morning Herald Peter Fray, The Sun-Herald director Greg Hywood and Jack Matthews, head of former Fairfax Digital.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-24 18:10

Australia's Fairfax Media, owner of newspaper, digital and radio assets, will present its five-year strategic plan tomorrow, The Australian reported. The plan's goal is to more closely integrate the company's print and digital operations.

Although the company's print circulation at its top newspapers, including The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and The Australian Financial Review, has declined, digital platforms will help the company to continue expanding its total audience. However, whether digital holdings can help the balance sheets is another issue.

Earlier this month, CEO Brian McCarthy said in an annual meeting that the company saw a 4 percent increase in revenue in the first four months of the year, and that Fairfax continues to focus on its strategy to monetize its online audience, The Sydney Morning Herald reported.

"Our paid online models need to be similar to another industry, say the pay TV industry," he said. "Remember, when they entered the market, they came in at quite a low level and they've done a great job of upping the yields. I think you've got to go and catch the audience, you've got to monetize it, then the yields will grow over time to make it a better return to the company."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-22 21:27

Rupert Murdoch's Australian newspapers will start charging for online content next year, News Corp. News Digital Media CEO Richard Freudenstein announced today, The Guardian revealed.

In an interview with ABC News radio, Freudenstein said The Australian, Daily Telegraph and the Herald-Sun were unlikely to follow The Times of London paywall model. "I think we're quite attracted to the Wall Street Journal model where you get the benefit of still getting a lot of your advertising revenue combining it with the ability to market yourself to a whole range of people and then upselling them into the paid part of the site," he said.

Freudenstein said The Wall Street Journal's approach "was very successful" as it allow readers to get some content for free. According to paidContent.org, The Times website charges £1 a day or £2 a week and it's only free for those with a print subscription, whereas the "WSJ.com is priced at $1.99 weekly but billed as $103.48 and includes some articles free to visitors from search listings."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-19 22:57

Content sharing platform Meebo is almost finished raising US$25 million in a fourth round of funding, AllThingsD reported Tuesday. Once the current round of funding is closed, the California-based company will have a total of $60 million.

Meebo places ad-supported toolbars on content sites (such as Mediaweek.com, Maxim.com and AllThingsD), which stay in position at the bottom of the screen as users scroll down the site's page, paidContent explained. Buttons on the toolbar can allow users to share content on the page through social media sites, like Twitter and Facebook. The firm also offers users different ways for users to access chats through a Web portal.

Image: Meebo.com The Meebo Bar has a 1 percent click-through rate, and the average Meebo user spends 60 seconds with an ad, according to AllThingsD.

Currently Meebo reaches 180 million unique users, double the amount it reached a year ago. CEO Seth Sternberg told AllThingsD that 87 percent of its advertisers last year came back in 2010, doubling their budgets, on average.

Users can login to meebo.com, where they can access their instant messenger account and multiple social platforms "to communicate and share with the friends that matter the most!" the site states.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-18 16:18

Postmedia Network Inc, which bought Canwest's newspaper division in July for US$1.1 billion, reported a 23 percent increase in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year that ended up on August 31, the Calgary Herald revealed Monday. Revenue totalled C$241.3 million, 1.5 percent higher than the C$237.7 million reported by Canwest in 2009.

The growth was led by a 7 percent increase in digital revenue and a 2 percent in print advertising, the company explained in a press release. However, it reported losses of C$44.6 millions.

Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey said the company will remain privately owned until the half of 2011. Photo: the National Post

The results included both Canwest and Postmedia's financials, as the media group bought the 11 national dailies and 35 community newspapers six weeks before the end of the fiscal year, The Globe and Mail pointed out.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-17 21:48

Tribune Co. Chairman Sam Zell announced yesterday he will leave the company after it exits bankruptcy proceedings - the largest bankruptcy in the history of American media.

"I think when we're done with the bankruptcy process I will turn it over to whoever the creditors decide they want to run it, and wish them a lot of good luck," Zell told CNBC in an interview. He has even admitted that the situation at the Tribune is a "deal from hell;" however, he insists the company now is in "dramatically better shape" than when he took it private in 2007, and has a healthy cash flow for the next 12 months.

Image: Gawker

Last month the company began moving closer to exiting bankruptcy, as it filed a reorganisation plan backed by its leading creditors, including Goldman Sachs Loan Partners, Oaktree Capital Management and Marathon Asset Management.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-16 22:38

The value proposition of new news businesses shouldn't be about saving journalism; rather, they need to focus on meeting consumers' needs and wants, and finding solutions, Mark Briggs, author of "Journalism 2.0" and "Journalism Next," told Missouri School of Journalism's David Cohn.

Entrepreneurs need "to focus on what the consumer needs - what pain are you solving - that's a real Silicon Valley kind of concept, and you see a lot of journalism start-ups that are really about trying to recreate the old jobs that journalists had. That's great, if it would work, but that's not the fantasy world we live in. We live in a world where businesses happen because consumers want something, and so you need to focus on what consumes want. What kind of solution can I bring that will solve this pain?" explained Briggs, who is also working on an upcoming book about entrepreneurial journalism.

Hybrid business models have to begin with a focus on what the business is really about, he added.

"In Silicon Valley, failure is ok; experimentation and risk is great," he pointed out. Those qualities weren't encouraged in journalism in the past, but they are the qualities that need to be embraced today, he said.

For the full video, visit Cohn's blog at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-15 22:20

German media group Bertelsmann AG announced today it earned €259 million in the first nine months of the year, thanks to cost-cutting and a recovering advertising market, The Canadian Press reported.

Last year in the period January to September, the privately held company reported losses of €205 million. Revenue, meanwhile, was up 3.5 percent, from €10.64 billion to €11.01 billion. Before taxes and interest, earnings reached €1.02 billion, compared to €424 million last year, Reuters noted.

Image: Apple

Bertelsmann, which owns book publishing (Random House), magazine publishing (Gruner + Jahr), television (RTL Group), media services (Arvato) and more, in more than 50 countries, expects group results for the full fiscal year 2010 to reach more than €500 million, according to Authorlink.

In the United States, United Kingdom and Germany, its Random House e-book sales were up about 300 percent in the first six months of the year, and its e-book titles available in those countries also increased to 20,000 titles. However, Random House closed its publishing sectors in Korea and Japan.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-11 23:57

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation