Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Employment

The CQ-Roll Call Group, which publishes targeted publications that cover the U.S. Congress, cut 44 jobs on Thursday, AFP reported this morning.

The job losses see the editorial staff reduced by more than 20 percent. Laurie Battaglia, managing director of the CQ-Roll Call Group, informed staff by memo, citing the amalgamation of the group's titles as the basis of the cuts.

"While this reorganisation has many positive elements, there is also an unfortunate consequence of this assessment, and that is the elimination of 44 editorial positions, spread across all newsrooms," she said. "But we are happy to now say that our restructure is complete, and no further personnel reductions of this nature are forthcoming," she added.

The originally competing publications, Roll Call and Congressional Quarterly, were founded in 1955 and 1945, respectively, and provide in-depth coverage of Congress.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-25 18:07

A Boston Globe union boss has had his financial privileges with the Boston Newspaper Guild suspended pending a probe into his possible violation of financial rules, The Associated Press reported Thursday.

The executive board, which announced the suspension to members via letter on Thursday, would not specify the misfeasance of which Daniel Totten, president of the Boston Globe's largest union, stood accused.

Reached by The AP, Totten said it was an ''internal matter'' and declined further comment.

In an e-mail to members, Trotten denied wrongdoing and said the probe centres on the "simple matter" of the countersignature on his own pay check. "There are those who are engaging in a political vendetta as a result of the hard feelings that remain in our Union following our contentious contract negotiation," he wrote, according to a report by the Globe.

Following a threat by the Globe's parent company, The New York Times Co., to close the newspaper, the Guild approved a contract in July that called for an 8.3 percent wage cut and other measures to save the newspaper $10 million a year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-25 17:05

Express Newspapers today announced a reduction in the number of staff it will cut, down to 75 from its original announcement of 90, the Guardian.co.uk reported today. The newsroom cull will be reduced from 70 journalists to between 52 and 57.

A redundancy plan proposed by the company suggested 18 clerical, 52 editorial and five managerial job losses, initially pursuing voluntary redundancies. The union said it has received 22 volunteers for redundancies, 16 in London, five from Glasgow and one from Broughton.

"While the company initially proposed a larger number of redundancies, it considers now, after initial consultation, that a number of around 75 proposed redundancies with separate cost savings in areas other than staffing are what may be required," the group's editorial director, Paul Ashford, wrote in a letter to the National Association of Journalists. "Since we do not anticipate seeing any improvement in circulation or advertising during the current economic recession and the assessment is that these areas will continue to decline in the coming months the company therefore must seek substantial cost savings in order to manage their very difficult and continuing financial challenges."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-24 16:49

Fairfax Media Chairman Ron Walker has continued to be undecided over whether he will step down from the company's board, with his latest proposal suggesting he will delay his decision until the annual shareholders' meeting in November, the Australian Business Journal reported Wednesday.

In an interview with The Australian Financial Review, Walker originally said he would retire at the end of next year. However, this prompted director and major shareholder John B. Fairfax to demand Walker step down as part of the company's "board renewal" plans.

The annual general meeting is scheduled for Nov. 10. The Australian Business Journal suggested that Walker would promote deputy chairman Roger Corbett as his successor. The Fairfax family has expressed agreement with Corbett in the chairman position, but would prefer an independent outsider. Fairfax, meanwhile, has claimed that he has enough support within the shareholders to prevent Walker from being re-elected. This support includes a number of the company's premier investors.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-23 19:50

Only six in 10 U.S. journalism and mass communication majors were employed full time within eight months of graduation showed a survey this summer by Lee Becker at the University of Georgia.

Meanwhile, those programmes conferred 55,000 - more than ever granted in the discipline's history. "The days when you climbed onto the best newspaper you could and looked forward to doing the same thing for 40 or 50 years are over," Dean Mills, head of the Missouri School of Journalism, told the AP in an article on the subject this week. "People who want security or lack ambition probably should not be in journalism schools these days."

Meanwhile, news outlets large and small are heavily supplementing their staffs - both in print and online with a glut of unpaid interns in summer and throughout the school year, as illustrated by the Washington Post. And in the online world, former publishing professionals are back at square one, the Los Angeles Times reported.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-22 18:22

Cost-cutting newspapers have shed many of their youngest reporters, editors and photographers even as U.S. publishers struggle to remain relevant and become profitable via Internet, the Associated Press Managing Editors recently reported.

"A main challenge now is to understand how diverse readers are using digital tools, and to remember diversity concepts when shaping digital content," wrote Executive Editor Richard Stevens, of the Leaf-Chronicle in Clarksville, Tenn., in responding to the 13-question survey.

Meanwhile, other forms of diversity apparently held steady despite the wave of layoffs washing over American newsrooms generally. The American Society of News Editors, which has conducted a census of newsrooms since 1978, reported in April that the percentage of ethnic and racial minorities in U.S. newsrooms stood at 13.41 percent, a decline of .11 percentage points from the year prior.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-22 13:07

On Tuesday union members at the Chicago Sun-Times rejected the concessions proposed as part of the potential purchase of the newspapers parent company Sun-Times Media Group by local banker James Tyree, CEO of Mesirow Financial Inc., Editor & Publisher reported Wednesday.

The Chicago Newspapers Guild rejected the concessions with a vote of 83-22. Tyree has said his offer stands until Sept. 29, according to the Sun-Times.

Tom Thibeault, executive director at the guild, said the proposed concessions, "gut our contract and takes away most rights that protects our members."

The motion accompanying the rejection said the Guild is "willing to bargain with the company on provisions that would help the company survive but not willing to give up all the rights of our members."

Hours before the union meeting, Sun-Times Chariman and interim CEO Jeremy Halbreich had appealed to staff, stating:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-16 17:55

The New-Journal Corp., parent company of Daytona Beach News-Journal, revealed on Tuesday that 39 positions had been cut from the newspaper, the Orlando Sentinel reported Wednesday. This includes the loss of 14 newsroom employees.

The online announcement cited declining advertising revenue as part of the economic downturn as the catalyst for the job cuts.

"We had hoped . . . our ad performance would have started to stabilize by this time, but we have not seen any signs of improvement, yet," said James Hopson, chief executive manager, in an e-mail to employees.

The company, which has been on the market for over a year, has reduced its staff base from nearly 800 in April 2008 to just 483 current employees.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-16 16:13

While the Sun-Times Media Group has received an offer for its purchase, before the sale may be finalised it must have the approval of the company's unions, which face significant contract concessions, the Chicago Tribune reported Thursday.

Union representatives are shocked at the cost reductions they are being asked to make, which is a prerequisite for the sale of the bankrupt U.S. publisher.

"This basically guts our contract. It's a terrible, terrible thing," Tom Thibeault, executive director of the Chicago Newspaper Guild, told the Tribune. "I do not anticipate our members supporting this."

The concessions as part of a new three-year contract, which includes a reduction of the severance pay out from 50 weeks of wages to just four, the right of management to transfer and reassign employees without consulting unions and the elimination of seniority rules when making staff reductions.

Staff fear making such concessions to allow the company to keep operating will then see them without a job, according to the Tribune.

A private investment group led by Chicago banker Jim Tyree was announced as a potential purchaser on Monday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-11 19:09

The Regina Leader-Post has informed staff that it will begin outsourcing some of its jobs overseas as owner Canwest attempts to cuts costs, CBC news reported on Thursday.

The newspaper revealed that it will move portions of its advertising jobs to India and the Philippines. The company did not announce how many employees would be affected by the outsourcing, however newsroom employees will not be affected.

"Due to challenges faced by our industry, the global economic downturn and serious impacts to advertising revenue, we have been conducting strategic reviews across our company with a goal of reducing our operating [expenses] -- as have all other media companies," Canwest director of communications Phyllise Gelfand said.

"This was not an easy decision to make and not one that was made lightly."

According to Gelfand, the Leader-Post will join more than 150 U.S. based newspapers that have begun to outsource.

The newspaper's publisher, Canwest Global Communications Corp., has been burdened by around $4 billion worth of debt.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-04 19:32

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