Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Employment

Time Warner Inc.'s business magazine will reduce the editions it publishes each year by more than 25 percent, Reuters India reported today. The reduction in editorial content comes as journalism advertising continues to struggle out of a yearlong slump. Yahoo! India reported today that management declined to comment on the matter, but that the company expected to cut some 600 jobs across various publications, amounting to more than six percent overall.

This is Time Inc.'s second round of layoffs in the past year, according to Bloomberg. In November 2008, the company cut as many as it expects to dismiss this year. The Wall Street Journal reported today that unidentified sources revealed that those scheduled to be laid off will be advised in the coming weeks. Part of Fortune's overhaul will also include an upgrade to the Web site, the Wall Street Journal said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-23 17:21

The New York Times announced today it is looking for 100 more newsroom staffers to resign voluntarily by year's end, The Associated Press reported today. Failing to meet its target through that approach, the newspaper will force the issue through more obligatory layoffs starting in December.

"I won't pretend that these staff cuts will not add to the burdens of journalists whose responsibilities have grown faster than their compensation," wrote Executive Editor Bill Keller in an e-mail to employees this afternoon.

In the past year, The Times has borrowed money, sold assets, and suspended stock dividend payments in order to avoid "the disabling cutbacks that have hit other newsrooms," the Wall Street Journal reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-19 21:42

GateHouse Media, publisher of several hundred small-town print and online newspapers across the United States, announced last week that it would reverse paycuts imposed over the summer as early as Monday of next week, the Boston Herald reported Friday.

Meanwhile, the Boston Globe newspaper, which was taken off the New York Times Company's auction block last week due to its improved financial condition, is not likely to enjoy the same treatment, the Boston Herald reported Saturday.

In a memo to staffers, CEO Richard Daniels explained the GateHouse restoration to former pay rates was not indicative of increased profits, Media Nation reported Friday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-19 17:04

Shares of McClatchy Co. (MNI), the third largest newspaper publisher in the United States, have been inching steadily higher for a week, climbing today to an 11 and a half month peak due to increased trading volume, Trading Markets reported Tuesday.

The surge may have been sparked by rumours of a merger with Google, Inc.
The media group, which bought Knight Ridder in 2006, owns 30 daily newspapers in 29 U.S. markets. It has also developed a substantial online presence, joining The Associated Press mobile news network as recently as last month.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-13 17:59

The Star-Ledger of Newark, New Jersey has halved its newsroom staff in the past year, and its editor just announced his retirement. Now the paper is asking for 50 more buyouts, Editor & Publisher reported Tuesday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-13 17:17

Not content to leave success to chance, 13 New York Times staffers have spent almost four years analysing the myriad of ways the newspaper might better use new media to connect with existing and potential readers, Editor & Publisher reported yesterday.

The NYT's research and development team is organised into three main categories: core technology development, emerging platforms, and analytics and audience generation.

The unorthodox application of a research and development component to the world of publishing comes even as science laboratories have begun outsourcing or pooling such functions because of their perceived inefficiencies.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-09 15:13

Today is shaping up to be a crucial day for Sun-Times Media Group Inc. (STMG), the Chicago Tribune observed Sunday.

By 5 p.m., the STMG and its unions will know whether other buyers have emerged to challenge Chicago financier Jim Tyree's US$26.5 million offer for the Chicago Sun-Times and more than 50 suburban newspapers, paidContent also reported.

Despite rumors that Tribune Co. (which owns Sun-Times rival the Chicago Tribune) might launch a surprise bid for Sun-Times Media's assets, sources say that isn't likely to happen, PoynterOnline reported Sunday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-05 16:56

A consumer advocacy columnist terminated by Connecticut newspaper The Hartford Courant this summer has sued his former employer in state court, alleging the newspaper violated his right to free speech when it fired him in order to appease advertisers, Editor & Publisher reported Wednesday.

The Courant blames the current economic downturn for the separation, further noting that the columnist, George Gombossy, never had a contract and, so, was an at-will employee who could be fired at any time for good cause, bad cause or no cause at all.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-30 16:07

Some U.S. newspaper plans are under-funded by hundreds of millions of dollars, and a law is kicking in that will force companies to become fully funded in the next seven years, Editor & Publisher reported today.

The Pension Protection Act of 2006 applies to all companies that offer the traditional "defined benefit" pension plan that accumulates money and pays it out in set amounts when an employee retires.
These are different from the "defined contribution" 401(k) plans that have largely replaced them. The pension act does not apply to 401(k) plans.

An updated status of newspaper pension funds was recently published in the second edition of Credit Encyclo-Media, an annual report by Fitch Ratings.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-29 16:57

Philadelphia Newspapers LLC's road out of bankruptcy protection has been slowed as the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. voiced objections to the publisher's planned reorganisation. The PBGC said the proposal does not adequately address how the company will honour its pension obligations, the Wall Street Journal reported today.

Court documents filed by PBGC on Thursday object to the publishing company's suggestion that the pension plan can be kept or terminated due to bankruptcy proceedings. Philadelphia Newspapers owns The Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, and the plan covers 250 present and retired employees, according to Editor & Publisher.
The federal corporation that guarantees 44 million Americans their pension payments disagreed that the pension programme was free to be scrapped, arguing the publisher must follow specific laws relating to the termination of pension contracts. The PBGC said so far the publisher's pension fund had missed around $10.3 million in payments, according to the WSJ.

The newspaper publisher last month announced a proposal that would see the company exit bankruptcy under the ownership of a group of investors who would put $35 million in the company as well as a $17 million letter of credit.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-28 14:00

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