Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Employment

In a process underway since May 2007, a wage board established by the Indian legislature met today with newspaper employees, their unions, and their employers in the central city of Lucknow, The Press Trust of India today reported. Lucknow is the capital city of Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, which publishes 11,789 of the country's 74,000 newspapers, The Indo-Asian News Service in July reported.

Board chairman Justice G R Majithia along with nine other members visited Uttar Pradesh for two days to gather more information toward establishing a minimum rate of pay nationwide for editorial and non-editorial employees alike. The board's recommendations are due to the legislature in May 2010, according the board's enabling legislation.

Strides to impose a fair wage on local publishers come even as India opens its journalism market to global brands such as The Wall Street Journal, as reported by The Business Standard in December 2008. Under the new standards, foreign publications can run content entirely from abroad, Mint reported in September 2008.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-11 17:12

The Church of Scientology has a long, storied tradition of fighting back in the public eye when characterised by the media as a cult, which has been often. Typically, though, the organisation's response has been limited to either suing or pursuing, according to a massive series published last week by The St. Petersburg Times. Today, the 56-year-old embattled institution turns the page.

Apparently, Scientology leadership has decided to adopt a "fight fire with fire" approach in this instance, offering employment to seasoned journalists principally in the Tampa Bay area of Florida, according to Gawker. The investigative reporters would freelance for Freedom Magazine, a publication which bills itself as covering "human rights and social betterment issues" and conducting "investigative reporting in the public interest" since 1968.

The want ad, posted by Journalism Jobs, says the freelance gig includes both "short- and long-range assignments" but can "be conducted by phone and through Internet research."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-11 16:11

French journalists on Tuesday penned an open letter to their nation's president, Nicolas Sarkozy, seeking relief from what they see as an attack on the press industry from all sides, Le Monde yesterday reported.

Calling the situation "extremely troubling," The National Journalists' Union (SNJ, by its initials in French) linked the ongoing economic collapse of traditional news media to the onset of Sarkozy's term of office in May 2007, according to the letter published on the organisation's Web site.

The journalists complain that even free tabloids - which were long hailed the answer to disaffected readers - are operating in the red while paid dailies suffer enormous declines in ad revenues.

In response, the journalists say they cannot be counted on to deliver the news effectively to the public without the government's concession to the following demands:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-06 15:03

Under the banner, "Our precarity is your disinformation," the 600,000 member-journalists in 116 countries of the International Federation of Journalists have declared today to be the International Day in Defense of Journalists, the Madrid Press Association announced Monday on its Web site.

In support of that campaign, Spanish journalists have advised they would "take to the streets" at noon "in defense of media professionals' employment rights" and the public's right to quality, credible news reporting. A journalism school in Catalunya also promised to picket in solidarity at San Jaume Plaza during the same hour.

A further public protest is planned for Thursday, November 11, by the staff of 20 Minutos, a free national tabloid, 233 Grados reported last month. According to PR Noticias, 20 Minutos staff interrupted a management meeting in late October to announce their particular strike and demand the leadership's resignation for failing to generate profits while ignoring staff writers' proposals on doing so.

The tabloid's staff - which stood at 340 a year ago - has been reduced by 140, with more cuts in the online division underway, Press Digital reported in October.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-05 17:00

Microsoft announced its third round of cut this year, which will affect another 800 jobs, due to depressing sales and profits, Media Post reported.

"Some portion of the new cuts will serve as the final phase of the company's original plan, announced in January of this year, to cut up to 5,000 jobs over 18 months. However, the new layoffs are expected to take the company beyond the original plan, as well," according to the tech news site TechFlash. paidContent also noted that "the number of jobs cut so far seems to have now exceeded the 5,000 figure, since Microsoft had said in its most recent quarterly filing that it had already eliminated 4,600 positions as part of those reductions."

One week ago, the company reported another sharp downturn in revenue and profits, although the results were already better than analysts' expectation.

Microsoft eliminated 1,400 jobs in January, followed by additional cuts in May. However, at that time the company warned that more layoffs were still to come.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-11-04 18:12

The parent company of Canada's most widely read newspaper yesterday announced it would ship more than 100 newspaper jobs overseas, Bloomberg reported. The announcement comes even as Torstar Corp. today posted third quarter gains, according to Editor & Publisher.

One hundred of the Toronto Star jobs being offshored are editorial in nature, accounting for a quarter of the newsroom, a union leader told the Globe & Mail. Approximately 60 more jobs in advertising and layout are reportedly moving to India as well, Canadian Business said yesterday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-04 17:27

The Wall Street Journal yesterday advised the nine employees staffing its Boston office that, henceforth, the former heart of the financial newspaper's mutual fund coverage would be absorbed by its New York bureau, Mutual Fund Wire reported yesterday.

By way of explanation, Managing Editor Robert Thomson said the newspaper remains "in the midst of a profound downturn in advertising revenue," The Associated Press yesterday reported.

News Corp., which owns the Journal, did not announce plans to close the Boston offices of Dow Jones Newswires and MarketWatch, Reuters reported yesterday.

Plans to close the Journal's Boston bureau followed Tuesday's announcement that the Journal would stop selling a London edition and focus instead on launching a redesigned product for all of Europe in mid-November, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 17:00

Canadian journalists took to the streets yesterday, clamoring for discretion in their collective bargaining process with La Presse, North America's largest French-language publication, Radio-Canada reported yesterday. The staffers say that as long as publishers leverage thinly-veiled threats of job loss reported in their pages to wage their labour-and-employment battle, workers will be forced to air publicly their side of the struggle, too.

"You feel the pressure, you feel your jobs are threatened, so, inevitably, you're weaker and the feeling is very palpable in the people and this fear becomes an asset to the employer," Karim Benessaieh was quoted by Radio-Canada as saying in French.

Overall, though, they would prefer to negotiate behind closed doors, according to Radio-Canada's report. The Information Workers of La Presse Syndicate (STIP by its acronym in French) complained in September of past edicts to the union published by management in its editorial pages, as Yahoo! News Quebec then reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 16:58

The road which lies ahead for the Bhutan Times just got tougher.

Three weeks ago, the country's only publicly-traded publisher changed hands as it faced a loss of Nu 5.39 million (US$115,790) South Asia Media reported Saturday. Then, along with new chairman and CEO Wancha Sangey, the newspaper secured written pledges from all employees to do their best to help bring the newspaper back from the economic brink. Now, half of those same employees abandoned ship Friday, citing irreconcilable differences over how much editorial control management should reasonably be permitted to exert for the sake of commerce.

Sangey views the dispute as centering instead on issues of defamation and a plot to bankrupt the company. "Since I joined, I made one request to them that, while freedom of speech is very important, we shouldn't forget that we're Bhutanese and that you can slur a ministry if it's wrong but not Bhutan as a nation."

Seven former journalists signed a rebuttal to Sangey's charges in a letter to the editor published by Bhutan Today. Concurrently, Bhutan Today's managing director, Tenzin Dorji, denounced the resignations as immoral, adding that he had no intention of hiring them to his sole proprietor publication.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-27 15:05

John Terry has apparently cleared any controversy with England's Football Association over striking a deal with Rupert Murdoch's Sun newspaper to write an occasional first-person column about Chelsea, the soccer team he captains, Mail Online reported yesterday. The Sun is a popular sport news destination in the United Kingdom.

Precise details about the frequency of the column and the compensation to be paid were not immediately available, though the contract purportedly entails a six-figure sum.

The columnist deal comes only five months after the Press Complaint Commission rejected Terry's privacy complaint against the Sun, which the Guardian wrote about in May.

The PCC held that reference to Terry was "reasonable" in a story about suspected shoplifting by his mother and mother-in-law in a Tesco store, a corporate sponsor of England's team, and Marks & Spencer, which supplied the team uniforms.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-26 13:13

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