Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Employment

The Financial Times will lift a year-long ban on raises and also increase its minimum wage for entry-level journalists in the new year, The Guardian reported yesterday.

FT Managing Editor Dan Bogler was quoted by The Guardian as saying that instituting the modest increase of 2 percent "balances a decent reward for everyone's efforts with a need to be careful about how far we increase our fixed costs."

The announcement comes a month after FT's parent, Pearson, revealed expectations that the worst of the recent economic crisis was over.

"In FT Publishing, the Financial Times continued to face a weak market for financial and corporate advertising in the third quarter, but it is benefiting from its long-term strategy of earning premium revenues from users for valued content in print and online," CEO Marjorie Scardino was quoted as saying by Fitz & Jen in October.

In 2007, FT instituted a firewall around its online edition, which boasts a paying base of more than 121,000 subscribers. Paid online subscriptions are up 22 percent from last year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-20 16:12

Colin Lin, 50, invites fellow couturiers the world over to brainstorm new uses for old newspapers, according to The Associated Press. The Taiwan-based designer has already come up with her own strategy: attach them to strips of cotton and weave them into shoes and bags that are ecofriendly as well as profitable.

"I only contribute very little to recycling all the newspapers dumped everyday around the world," Lin was quoted in today's AP article as saying. "But other footwear and bag manufacturers may want to copy my idea and so contribute their own share to dealing with the problem."

Apparently, some already have. The full wardrobe of a fashion show at Hainan University last October featured nothing but recycled newspaper clothing, as China View then reported.

Photo: AP, via Daily Press

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-20 15:34

An industry already rattled by severe reductions in force was further shaken yesterday as police raided production areas of several New York newspapers, CNN Justice reported yesterday. Prosecutors, who refused to further explain what prompted the investigation, limited public remarks to absolving the newspapers themselves.

New York's Newspaper & Mail Deliverers boasts a 1,600-member non-editorial union, long suspected of ties to organised crime, ChattahBox yesterday reported. A similar racketeering probe in the 1990s led to criminal indictment of the union's then-president, accused and later acquitted of involvement with the Lucchese crime family. The same union has yet to shake the taint of allegations it attempted to extort the New York Post into switching delivery companies.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-18 16:49

The Washington (D.C.) Blade closed its doors by noon yesterday, another casualty of the insolvency of its Atlanta-based parent publisher Windows Media, The Washington Times reported today. The weekly tabloid was reputedly the longest-running gay newspaper in the United States.

Undaunted by the abrupt closure, though, staffers intend to carry on with a public social event scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday in the District of Columbia's Hard Rock Cafe restaurant, The Washington Examiner reported yesterday. The publication confirmed the event yesterday via Twitter.

Former Blade Editor Kevin Naff told Politico yesterday that the staff welcomes community input at today's coffeehouse klatch aimed at reviving the paper, though no location for the latter gathering was announced. Naff told The Sexist yesterday that the idea to restart the 40-year-old publication was as sudden as the paper's closure was abrupt: "We're going to take a day off to pack, and then dust ourselves off and get back to work," he said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 16:26

The (Colorado Springs, United States) Gazette shed 11 more workers Friday, the Denver Post reported today. This round of layoffs, which hit the newsroom hardest with seven from editorial positions, brings the total staff of the Colorado daily under 300.

The Gazette is owned by Freedom Communications Inc., based in Irvine, Calif., according to 5280 Magazine. Freedom filed for bankruptcy protection from its creditors in September, as 5280 then reported.

Weekday subscriptions from April through September at The Gazette were down 7.8 percent as compared to the same period last year, The Gazette Friday reported.

Tellingly, The Gazette is one of 13 major U.S. newspapers not seeking credentials for engaging in live coverage of the 2010 Winter Olympics set for Vancouver, Canada, Sports Business Journal yesterday reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 16:07

Adobe, maker of pdf software, has announced plans to create a new division within the company devoted to products focused on newspapers, among other things, Read Write Web today reported. The initiative comes even as Adobe has had to lay off 10 percent of its workforce in other departments due to the economic climate of the past year.

Though Adobe's announcement did not specify which newspaper products were in development, The Boston Globe newspaper may give a hint. The Globe today launched GlobeReader, a digital newspaper that replaces print but does not require live Internet access the entire time it is being viewed. The GlobeReader relies on Adobe Flex and Adobe AIR, both components of the Flash Platform, as announced in today's press release.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-13 20:02

The New York Times News Service, which, like The Associated Press, repackages its articles for redistribution to news wires around the world, will trim 25 of 28 jobs and relocate this arm of its operations to Florida, paidContent reported yesterday.

The new round of cuts comes on the heels of 100 layoffs recently announced in the print newsroom, Reuters today reported. Starting sometime in 2010, the news service will be housed at The Gainesville Sun, a non-unionised New York Times Co. newspaper, according to The New York Times.

In conjunction with the move, The New York Times Co. announced it would stop pension contributions for management and nonunionised workers, instead diverting 3 percent of employee salaries to their 401(k) plans, All Things Digital yesterday reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-13 17:52

The executive editor of The Washington Times walked out on the newspaper effective November 6, 2009, The Associated Press reported today. John Solomon, formerly with The Washington Post, had only held the position since January 2008.

Politico yesterday reported that The Times had announced on Monday its dismissal of three top executives: President and Publisher Tom McDevitt, Chief Financial Officer Keith Cooperrider, and Board Chairman Dong Moon Joo. In the leadership wake, Jonathan Slevin ascended to acting president and publisher.

In a separate announcement, The Times' human resource department issued a memorandum to employees stating that the company would no longer contribute to pensions starting today, Talking Points Memo today reported.

The Washington Monthly magazine speculated on Wednesday that the newspaper was facing financial difficulties it might not be able to outlast.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-13 16:42

A former editor who was fired from her position at the New York Post in September sued her former employer Monday, claiming her dismissal was discriminatory and stemmed from her complaints surrounding an editorial cartoon that critics said likened U.S. President Barack Obama to a dead chimpanzee, The Associated Press reported Tuesday. Sandra Guzman served as an associate editor at the Post since 2003.

The suit puts the magazine's parent company, media conglomerate News Corp., at the centre of yet another legal controversy this week. The Post maintains Guzman's position was eliminated because " the section she edited was discontinued due to a decline in advertising sales," according to a statement.
Tempo magazine, a monthly insert in the Post, was apparently designed to increase readership by Latinos, which rose 40 percent under Sandra Guzman's leadership, The Courthouse News Service reported yesterday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-12 21:01

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