Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Employment

Dow Jones Director Dieter Von Holtzbrinck has quit in protest over News Corp.'s bid to buy the company, a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing has revealed.

Although the board voted the company be sold to Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. in a $5 billion takeover bid, Von Holtzbrinck wrote he could not agree with the board, and he did not vote on the proposal.

“Although I'm convinced that News Corp.'s offer is very generous in financial terms, I'm very worried that Dow Jones unique journalistic values will long-term strongly suffer after the proposed sale,” he wrote from Stuttgart.

Von Holtzbrinck wrote that board members are charged with voting for the deal that is in the best financial interest to shareholders, unless it can be proved the deal is risky.

“I cannot prove that my worries are right. I can only refer to News Corp. business practices in the past, can only refer to Jim Ottaway's article in the Journal, etc. I do not believe that the "Special Committee" can finally prevent Murdoch from doing what he wants to do, from acting his way,” he wrote.

A director on the Dow Jones board since 2001, Von Holtzbrinck is also an heir to the von Holtzbrinck publishing empire, The Wall Street Journal has reported.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-07-21 06:32

The Fresno Bee has announced it will outsource some of its advertising production jobs to workers in India.

The California newspaper, owned by McClatchy Company, will send seven of its 31 ad production jobs to India, and those currently holding the positions in Fresno will be terminated if they can not be placed in other jobs, said Ken Hatfield, a spokesman for The Bee.

The deal to hire seven people in India is with Express KCS LLC of San Jose, Calif., which has production facilities in New Delhi. Express also handles some production for at least five other California newspapers. The Indian workers will take over the jobs in September.

The move is meant to “serve our advertising customers more effectively, efficiently and economically while focusing our core business: producing relevant and compelling news and advertising information in our newspaper and on our Web sites,” said Ray Steele, publisher and president of the newspaper, in a statement.

Hatfield said that because India's workday happens during nighttime hours in California, it could speed up some production processes.

McClatchy is the third largest newspaper publisher by circulation in the United States.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-07-19 06:06

Facing the end of their joint operating agreement with Gannett Co. and The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post will stop publication on Dec. 31, 2007.

The decision comes three years after Gannett notified the E.W. Scripps Company, which owns the two newspapers, that the agreement would not be renewed when it expires at the end of this year. The agreement, which makes publication of The Post newspapers economically feasible, was signed in 1977.

Terms of the agreement stated Gannett and the Enquirer are responsible for all business operations at the two newspapers, including subscription and advertising sales, production and distribution. Scripps and Gannett have shared the combined profits from The Enquirer and The Post newspapers.

“After careful analysis and weighing several alternatives for the future of The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post, it's apparent to us that it would not be feasible to continue publishing the newspapers after the end of the joint operating agreement,” Rich Boehne, chief operating officer for Scripps and a former Post staff member, was quoted in the statement as saying. “The investment that would be needed to continue publishing a daily newspaper that could successfully compete in a marketplace with so many media alternatives would be prohibitive.”

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-07-18 09:53

Northcliffe Media will not cut editorial jobs or resources, and will instead invest in digital operations of the 25 titles it is buying from Trinity Mirror in the southeast corner of England, Northcliffe's managing director has said.

Michael Pelosi said any “efficiency drives” would not affect editorial staff, but could affect “back-of-house” positions, such as those in human resources and administration. Northcliffe's parent company is Daily Mail and General Trust.

“The board of DMGT have affirmed their decision to keep Northcliffe by investing further in regional assets, so my reaction is one of delight that we have been able to acquire the (Trinity Mirror titles),” he told Press Gazette. “We need to introduce our modern IT systems and we want to grow the digital side.”

In 2006, those titles generated 7.3 million pounds in profit.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-07-14 05:57

Striking, locked-out employees of the Quebecor Inc. tabloid Journal de Quebec picketed the newspaper's offices Wednesday for the first time since conflict began April 22, after a meeting between the union and management broke down.

The increasingly bitter dispute is over job cuts, changes to working conditions and concern the paper is losing its Quebec City identity.

Managers are continuing to publish the paper, using management employees and editorial material from the Journal de Montreal and agencies, while employees are distributing 40,000 free copies a day of their own full-colour newspaper, MediaMatinQuebec.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-07-13 06:19

A federal labour agency has accused the Washington Post on Thursday of repeatedly violating labour laws by failing to negotiate with the newspaper's union over extra work employees performed for its radio station.

The National Labor Relations Board said the Post has violated the laws since the beginning of 2006, when it failed to negotiate with the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild, which represents more than 1,200 employees.

The complaint also states employees were not fairly paid for work they contributed to Washington Post Radio, and the newspaper did not properly negotiate with the union before requiring employees do extra work for The Onion, an independent fake newspaper the Post prints, according to a statement by the labour board.

The newspaper is scheduled to appear before an administrative law judge in September.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-07-13 06:16

by Tatiana Repkova

The immediate future of Le Monde, the influential but loss-making French newspaper, has been plunged into uncertainty after its journalists voted to oust Jean-Marie Colombani, its editorial figurehead and the chief executive of its parent company. Colombani, a leading figure in French public life during his 13 years in charge of the title, needed the backing of his reporters and editors in order to secure a third mandate that would keep him in the post for the next six years.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/e5019334-0910-11dc-a349-000b5df10621,Authorised=...

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-05-23 12:16

by Tatiana Repkova

The vast majority of newspaper editors worldwide are optimistic about the future of their newspapers, according to a new global survey that provides an insider's view to newsroom attitudes and strategies.

The "Newsroom Barometer," conducted by Zogby International for the Paris-based World Editors Forum and Reuters, found that 85 percent of editors are very optimistic or somewhat optimistic about the future of their newspapers. The survey found that 40 percent of editors believe online will be the most common way to read the news ten years from now, 35 percent believe print will reign supreme, two-thirds believe opinion and analysis pages will grow in importance, half are convinced that the quality of journalism will improve and half believe shareholders and advertisers present threats to editorial independence.

The survey of 435 editors-in-chief, deputy editors and other senior news executives from around the world, and of whom half are from Europe, provides a picture of an industry in transition, but one that is rapidly adapting to the new media environment. The results of the Newsroom Barometer survey are contained in Trends in Newsrooms 2007, the annual WEF report on the latest editorial developments from around the world (http://www.trends-in-newsrooms.org ). The Newsroom Barometer, a partnership among WEF, Zogby and Reuters, will be conducted annually to assess changes in attitudes and strategies in newsrooms around the world.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-03-28 07:48

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