Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Employment

As Fairfax Media restructures, adding a digital director with wide-ranging media experience is essential for the Australian media group's renewal, board chairman Roger Corbett told The Australian this week.

Corbett said he is talking to potential hires who will help strengthen the digital area. "We have pretty good traditional media experience in, of course, John Fairfax and (managing director) Brian McCarthy, but we certainly want to have a mind that understands media and helps us move into this broad new era and the changes that will happen," he said.

Three new appointments to the board include Sam Morgan, founder of TradeMe, which was sold to Fairfax for A$700 million in 2006; Sandra McPhee, director of Australia's AGL energy and Kathmandu Holdings; and Linda Nicholls, former chairwoman of the Australian Post, according to The National Business Review.

"Audit and risk are very important for a big company, but after talking to Brian [McCarthy at an investor lunch] it would be good to see someone else who could push the digital growth story inside the boardroom," one Fairfax shareholder who asked to not be named told The Australian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-04 20:48

Gannett Co.'s USA Today will impose an unpaid leave for about 1,500 employees before July, in order to reduce cost and counter advertising and circulation sales downturn, according to a memo to staff, Bloomberg reported.

According to the publisher, David Hunke, in the memo, a pay halt started in February 2009 will be extended by at least 90 days.

"National advertising revenues in general were still down from the previous year as were paid advertising pages at USA Today. Circulation sales continued to be lower in the fourth quarter," added Hunke.

Gannett announced in December that most employees at local papers would be required to take five-day unpaid leave this quarter, originally excluding these at USA Today. However, most USA Today staff had to take two-week unpaid leave last year as part of a plan mandated by Gannett.

The memo was confirmed by Ed Cassidy, a spokesman for USA Today, Bloomberg reported.

"The title's nearly 1,500 employees must take a one-week furlough between Feb. 28 and July 3," Cassidy said Thursday, according to an Associated Press article posted on W Top.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-12 23:39

UK national newspaper business Associated Newspapers Ltd. this morning reported a 12 percent fall in overall revenue in the last three months of 2009 to £208 million for the period. Meanwhile, Associated's owner, Daily Mail and General Trust, recorded a year-on-year revenue decline of 15 percent in the last three months of 2009, to £482m for the period, Press Gazette reported.

Meanwhile, the company is looking to build new revenue streams, as evidenced by free daily Metro's plans to launch new revenue streams online, MediaWeek reported. Metro is looking to overhaul the commercial aspect of the site, while also launching new audio and video tools. The reworked site is expected to go live from its test phase next month.

Throughout the year, Metro is also planning to add many new revenue streams, such as entertainment-focused content, similar to its current gambling channel. However, no further details were provided, according to MediaWeek. In one of the first steps toward creating more online revenue, however, the editorial and product team will "have a more commercial focus" and report to the digital director instead of the newspaper's editor.

To present advertisers with the value of its audience, Metro has done audience research and is now calling its online audience "City Clickers," a group of 15 million heavy Internet users, ages 18 to 44.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-10 22:53

Swedish daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter has announced that it will cut between 100 and 120 jobs after sustaining multi-million euro losses, The Local reports. This amounts to almost one sixth of the newspaper's workforce.

The company employs 580 people, with half of these in the newsroom. Most of the cuts are expected to affect editorial staff, with more than a third of these set to go. The newspaper reported losses of 97 million kronor, or around €10 million, last year. Despite this, union official Hans Arbman said that the cuts were unexpected.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-08 19:26

Last Wednesday "financially troubled" daily Washington Times announced it will drop its sports section, Agence France-Presse reported Thursday. The paper recently made public its decision to drop a Sunday edition.

According to the National Post, the Times has laid off more than 40 percent of its staff and is planning to focus coverage more on cultural issues, politics, business and investigative reporting. The Los Angeles Times reported that in addition, the publication plans to concentrate less on local news this year. Nevertheless, some sports features will appear.

"Our market-based, forward-looking plan is both a response to the recessionary economy, continued downward financial pressures on the news industry and our transition into a 21st century multimedia enterprise," President and Publisher Jonathan Slevin said in a statement, according to the LA Times.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-01-04 16:01

Nearly 25 percent of the U.S. newspaper industry's jobs will no longer exist in 2018, according to a new report from the federal Bureau of Labor and Statistics, Editor & Publisher reported today. Of the top 10 industries by job loss, newspapers rank seventh.

As of the end of 2008, there were about 326,000 jobs in newspapers, but by 2018, that number will drop to 245,000, according to the Employment Projections Summary.
However, the prediction isn't surprising, Rick Edmonds, media business analyst at The Poynter Institute told E&P. "That is consistent with what has been happening the past three years. But I don't think the next three years will be as bad."

More than 15,000 people have lost their jobs so far in 2009, with 705 layoffs and buyouts announced so far for December alone, according to industry watcher News Cycle.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-16 19:09

The famed Washington Post newsroom of Woodward and Bernstein is no more, and in its place is a redesigned one. However, if the famed Watergate reporters found themselves trying to type up a story there today, they may have to borrow an editor's desk to do so.

After months of renovation in the Washington Post's newsroom, reporters are returning to find that two-thirds of the floor space is devoted to editors, while reporters' desks are barely large enough to hold a "notebook, phone and a few files," The Washingtonian's Harry Jaffe reported yesterday.

The gutted newsroom, before the redesign. Photo: Ian Shapira

Expecting to find a newsroom of the future, reporters are now complaining to editors, who now must worry about where to put reporters in addition to circulation and advertising woes, Jaffe wrote, terming the situation "desk envy."

The Post has planned to complete its merger of print and Web by January - as of late, print reporters were in the newspaper's headquarters in D.C., while online content creators were in a separate building, across the river in Arlington.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-15 23:57

A recent post on Alan Mutter's Reflections of a Newsosaur blog has rasied concerns over the potentially devasting impact the current financial crisis in the newspaper industry could have on the willingness of students to choose journalism as a profession.

Mutter argues that in a time where employment opportunities are shrinking and those who do manage to secure jobs are paid a pittance, a 'substantial percentage of the next generation of professional journalists' could be wiped out in a movement he dubs 'journicide.'

"Journicide has been under way since newspapers and other mainstream media began losing their formidable revenue-generating juju in 2006. The elimination of full-time professional journalism jobs since then has been so relentless that it has become remarkably, depressingly commonplace," he writes.

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-14 18:16

The New York Times Co. yesterday announced that it has abandoned plans to sell a Massachusetts newspaper due to a transformation of its "journalistic and business operations," Agence France-Presse reported yesterday.

Times Co. chairman Arthur Sulzberger and chief executive Janet Robinson were quoted by AFP as saying the following in a memo to employees of the Worcester Telegram & Gazette: "We are convinced that in partnership with the Boston Globe you are now prepared to move forward to a brighter future."

The Times Co. also withdrew The Boston Globe from sale in October, possibly due to paltry offers, The Boston Globe then observed.

Yesterday's announcement of improved finances at The Times Co. subsidiary coincided with the deadline for staffers at its flagship newspaper to voluntarily resign, according to Business Insider. The Times offered buyouts in October, hoping to cut 100 members of the editorial team by year's end without resorting to compulsory layoffs. An unnamed employee of The Times was quoted by Business Insider as saying that a second round of layoffs was expected in 2010.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-08 21:52

The former president of the Boston Newspaper Guild was impeached in absentia for misfeasance when he signed unauthorized checks as well as using a credit card for personal expenses, Editor & Publisher Thursday reported.
Daniel Totten, in office since 2005, was found guilty by a five-member panel in the internal proceeding. The organization, which represents 600 members, has been engaged over the last few years in protracted negotiations with the management of The Boston Globe, which is presently owned by New York Times Co., The Boston Herald reported Thursday. It was not immediately apparent whether civil or criminal charges would follow.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-04 21:49

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