Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


Employment

Rupert Murdoch is pushing forward with his plans for a tablet computer-only digital newspaper, tapping Greg Clayman, currently head of digital distribution for Viacom, to serve as publisher, All Things Digital's Peter Kafka reported yesterday.

News Corp. is looking to spend US$30 million to $40 million on the project, paidContent confirmed today.

The publication does not yet have a name or launch date, but has also hired New York Post Executive Editor Jesse Angelo to head up the editorial side. "For some reason, News Corp. (NWS) people (who also own this site), don't like to use the word "newspaper" to describe their plans for the news...thing. But as earlier reports have detailed, the idea is to create a subscription-based digital news service, designed expressly for mobile platforms like Apple's (AAPL) iPad and Google's (GOOG) Android phones and upcoming tablets," Kafka noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-23 19:52

Newsday, which is owned by Cablevision Systems Corp, will be hiring 34 journalists for its newsroom and digital team over the next six months, and it will add 2,600 news and opinion pages annually, Crain's New York reported yesterday.

"I'm very excited to announce that we are making this significant investment in people and pages to provide more and stronger coverage for Long Islanders," editor-in-chief Debby Krenek said in a memo sent to the newspaper staff, while explaining that the move is aimed at "boosting our local coverage," Poynter Online quoted.

Photo Source: Getty Images via The New York Observer
The announcement comes a few weeks after the company negotiated with workers to reduce pay by 5 and 10 percent. According to the New York Post, in the second quarter of this year, Newsday's revenue fall 9.7 percent to $80.1 million and its operating loss declined to $1.3 million from 2009's $2.8 million.

The paper's expansion will also touch the business section, which will now covered more local businesses, while the Sunday edition will have more local news.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-12 20:18

The Boston Globe is hoping that adding a new position, vice president of digital content development, will help to expand the newspaper's audience beyond print and its website, the daily announced today in a press release.

Jeff Moriarty, former senior vice president of product management at About.com, has been named to the position.

Moriarty will "play a central role in shaping and executing digital strategy that expand the Globe audience beyond the newspaper and its online site, Boston.com," the release stated. "Mr. Moriarty will guide both the development and the execution of plans that will help the Globe expand its capabilities to deliver news and information to readers wherever and however they want."

The press release, out this evening, did not give further details on what types of plans or strategies will be used to net a larger audience.

The Boston Globe is owned by The New York Times Company.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-11 00:44

Since 2008, more than 166 newspapers in the United States have closed down or stopped publishing a print edition, according to Paper Cuts, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

More than 39 titles did so in 2008, and the number rose to 109 in 2009. So far in 2010, more than 18 papers have closed down or stopped publishing a print version.

According to Paper Cuts, there have been nearly 35,000 job losses or buyouts in the U.S. newspaper industry since March 2007. From March to December 2007, more than 2,256 newspaper jobs have been reportedly eliminated or offered buyouts.

The numbers increased to more than 15,992 in 2008 and were at more than 14,783 in 2009. As of May 2010, there have been more than 1,797 job losses or buyouts in newspaper companies in the country, according to the report, Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-05 20:25

Compared to some parts of the world, the U.S. journalism market has experienced a more severe downturn. According to the American Society of News Editors, the country's newsroom workforce grew from about 45,000 in 1978 to more than 55,000 in 1989, but has been in a general state of decline since then. In 2006, the journalism workforce totalled about 55,000, but dropped to less than 50,000 within the next two years, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

According to the Amerian Society for Newspaper Edtiors census for 2009, a total of 5,200 newsroom professional jobs were cut, not as high as the 5,900 in 2008. Online-only newspapers also cut 284 jobs in 2009. This caused newsroom employment to drop to 41,500, from 56,400 in 2000. The percentage of losses are higher at big metros and lower at smaller titles, according to "The State of the News Media 2010," a report by The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism.

According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor, the number of jobs at newspaper publishing companies in the country has plunged from more than 450,000 in July 1990 to about 300,000 in July 2009. The decline began accelerating after 2001.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-02 17:16

Trinity Mirror is to cut 200 editorial staff at its three national titles, including the Daily and Sunday Mirror, and The People, Media Guardian reported.

The company said the cut was due to the creation of new multimedia newsrooms, which emerged from its web-based content management system, ContentWatch. Among all the 200 people being made redundant, 140 of them are full-time.

Photo: Daniel Jones / Alamy

The overall reduction in journalistic jobs across these 3 titles are more than 25 percent, paidContent:UK reported.

This layoff move, which involves reporters, writers, photographers as well as sub-editors and some desk editors, is one of the largest single layoff programmes by any British publishing group.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-11 04:19

The Oklahoman announced yesterday it will cut 57 jobs, blaming the layoffs on the "struggling advertising environment," Editor & Publisher reported.

According to Publisher David Thompson, the layoffs will affect all departments of the paper, including the newsroom. Employees who lose jobs were offered severance packages.

Thompson added that advertising volume is down across all media, and is "in the biggest downturn since the Depression," according to The Associated Press article posted on Google News.

"The Oklahoman's website is seeing an audience increase and that home delivery subscriptions are rising," said Thompson. He mentioned that the digital unit is working on new platforms such as Apple's recent iPad.

This round of layoffs at the paper was about one-third the size of the last in October 2008, E&P reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-06 19:58

The Washington Post is creating a "local blogging network," in which the newspaper will link to selected blogs from its Web site, Adam Pagnucco of Maryland Politics Watch wrote last week. As part of the network, the Post would ask bloggers to submit original content, which would be edited by Post editors. The Post would also have rights to that content through a written agreement, and expect that bloggers participate in a blogger "discussion" each week and stick to a "workflow" plan.

The only problem with the set-up is that the Post wouldn't actually pay the bloggers, he stated.

Pugnacco wrote in the Maryland Politics Watch blog: "Five weeks ago, I received an unsolicited offer from the Washington Post. They asked if they could post my picture and biography on their Web site and link to every new blog post appearing here if I agreed to produce regular original content for them at their request. I turned them down. Why? Because they wanted me to work for them for nothing."

Using Google subscriber counts, Pugnacco estimates that "MPW's rag-tag band of volunteers, guests and rogues has slightly more regular online subscribers than the Post's entire paid staff of Maryland reporters combined. Remind me again why WE should be working for the Post for free?"

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-03 23:03

In an effort to increase the popularity of its news site through original content, Yahoo has recruited many journalists from print and online media agencies and opened a bureau in Washington, The New York Times reported yesterday.

The move will bring together original news articles and videos created by its team of journalists on politics and media, and those licensed from the media sources on its news site.

The journalists joining the news division of Yahoo include prominent reporters and editors like Michael Calderone from Politico, Jane Sasseen, a former BusinessWeek Washington bureau chief, and Anna Robertson, an Emmy-winning news producer from ABC's "Good Morning America," along with other journalists hired from publications like the New York Observer, Washington Post, Talking Points Memo and several others, The Times reported.

A similar effort to boost its sports coverage was implemented by the search engine about three years ago, when it hired sports journalists to create original sport content and the acquisition of Rivals.com, a network of sports blogs, according to The Times. However, the original content push initiative came only as a succession to the failure of its expensive ambitious project on original television-style programming.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-01 00:38

As a part of the Tribune Co.'s efforts to reduce costs and direct resources to focus on local coverage, the Daily Press of Newport News, Virginia will outsource page design, formatting and editing pages to the company's flagship paper, the Chicago Tribune. This announcement came to the staff at both the newspapers on Monday, the Tribune reported.

The transfer of responsibilities from the Daily Press suggests elimination of copy editors and designers, Hampton Roads reported. The newsroom staff will likely be reduced by 15 percent, Digby Solomon, president and chief executive of the Daily Press, told the Tribune.
"We're going to have to learn how to really focus our resources on that which really differentiates us. For us, that's the local stuff. This allows us to save some money on personnel ... without impacting the reporters, columnists, photographers who are out generating uniquely local content," he said, according to the Tribune.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-10 23:41

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