Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Circulation and Readership

The value proposition of new news businesses shouldn't be about saving journalism; rather, they need to focus on meeting consumers' needs and wants, and finding solutions, Mark Briggs, author of "Journalism 2.0" and "Journalism Next," told Missouri School of Journalism's David Cohn.

Entrepreneurs need "to focus on what the consumer needs - what pain are you solving - that's a real Silicon Valley kind of concept, and you see a lot of journalism start-ups that are really about trying to recreate the old jobs that journalists had. That's great, if it would work, but that's not the fantasy world we live in. We live in a world where businesses happen because consumers want something, and so you need to focus on what consumes want. What kind of solution can I bring that will solve this pain?" explained Briggs, who is also working on an upcoming book about entrepreneurial journalism.

Hybrid business models have to begin with a focus on what the business is really about, he added.

"In Silicon Valley, failure is ok; experimentation and risk is great," he pointed out. Those qualities weren't encouraged in journalism in the past, but they are the qualities that need to be embraced today, he said.

For the full video, visit Cohn's blog at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-15 22:20

As part of a marketing deal between The Times and telecom company Three (Hutchison 3G UK), 3G customers will be offered free access to The Times and Sunday Times websites for the next three months, according to a report by CellularNews.com today.

Following the initial three months free offer, the pay as you go customers who top up every 30 days will continue to enjoy free access for another month, whereas the contract customers can continue getting access to the News International titles for £2 a week, TheInquirer.net reported today. This offer from Three is valid for new customers until March 2011.

Three had also announced earlier deals with Facebook by way of the social networks' Facebook Zero product, leading theNextWeb's Matt Brian to wonder: "how News International will report the additional subscribers and whether other newspapers will begin to maximise exposure via deals with mobile operators. The Guardian has recently started charging a monthly subscription for its iPhone app, could a operator deal follow?"

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-15 18:09

In a move that could threaten Google, Yahoo and AOL, social networking giant Facebook is planning to launch a webmail service on Monday, Slate reported today.

"Facebook has the world's most popular photos product, the most popular events product, and soon will have a very popular local deals product as well," TechCrunch's Jason Kincaid wrote.

Image via CNet

The initiative (termed "Project Titan") is believed to have e-mail features that analyse events, photos and friends from a user's page and use the data to then analyse e-mail and short messages, The Inquirer reported. Users will have facebook.com e-mail addresses, the Financial Times informed.

"The big unknown, though, is what Facebook e-mail could supply beyond an inbox and address book. Gmail genuinely innovated with storage capacity, the ability to archive e-mail, secure communications by default, and customisation through labs features. What might Facebook accomplish, especially given its quantitative knowledge of who is most important to whom in the social realm?" pondered CNet's Stephen Shankland.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-12 17:59

The Oregonian has plans to extend its hyperlocal strategy, Editor & Publisher reports. The publication, which already has 17 hyperlocal community pages on its web-partner Oregon Live, says it will be "adding more content to the existing pages and creating new ones in 2011."

The hyperlocal site focuses on sectional community news and allows readers to post relevant comments, news and event information on town-specific public blogs. Oregonian editor Peter Bhatia said, "They create room for a depth and breadth of community-level news that we never have had room for in the paper."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-12 16:20

Since raising its paywall in June, News International titles The Times and Sunday Times have seen the percentage of their UK users increase significantly. The percentage of people accessing the news site from within the United Kingdom has more than doubled, from less than 35 percent in February to 75 percent today, according to a report by MediaWeek.co.uk.

The paywall around the Times websites has also resulted in a more "affluent and more engaged digital audience," according to chief marketing officer Katie Vanneck, the report stated. Also, the frequency with which users are accessing News International's online content has risen, from an average of twice weekly, to an average of three times each week.

When comparing the sites to their competitors, UK audiences made up 36 percent of MailOnline's 46.9 million unique users in September, 34 percent for the Telegraph.co.uk, 42 percent for Guardian.co.uk and 43 percent for Independent.co.uk.

Vanneck said The Times and Sunday Times had more than 105,000 paid-for customers since June. By doing some basic math, even if we estimate that number today at 110,000 (with 75 percent being from within the UK), then 82,500 of those users are UK-based. Compare that to the MailOnline's 36 percent of 46.9 million uniques - reaching 16.884 million UK users. However, the number of returning users is likely much lower.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-11 14:49

According to the Guardian, Canada is becoming a world leader when it comes to innovative data journalism. Open data sites are popping up across Canada, providing "vast open data resources" and "the latest open data apps" for Canadians interested in all things from transit schedules and one-way street maps to election results by neighbourhood.

Datasets and spreadsheets are gathered by journalists around the country, but most notably by Patrick Cain, a Toronto-based data journalist. He pursues vast amounts of statistics, files and data and then plugs the compiled information into interactive maps, which can be viewed by the public.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-10 15:53

Two weeks after The Independent launched its new daily, called "i," media insiders estimate that the newspapers is selling a daily average of 125,000 copies, down from the initial 180,000 copies, MediaGuardian reported.

Although MediaGuardian acknowledged that newspaper's sales "are likely to be volatile until circulation settles," Andrew Mullins, the managing director of the Independent, Independent on Sunday and the London Evening Standard reminded that wholesale numbers do not provide numbers about the number of copies distributed.

"As a result, any numbers being talked about are purely conjecture as they do not know how many copies we have printed and distributed each day. Our numbers will remain confidential for the foreseeable future, but we can say that sales of the Independent at £1 are unaffected," Mullins said.

At £0.20 per copy, i is one of the cheapest newspapers in the UK. However, as a promotional offer, the publisher is giving readers vouchers that would allowed them to get a free copy of the newspaper for a week, paidContent.org revealed. To increase readership, i will soon launch an iPad app for the same price as the print copy.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-08 19:41

The UK edition of monthly magazine Reader's Digest revealed that on Tuesday it is embarking on a £3 million sampling campaign in hope of boosting its ABC circulation from 400,000 to 700,000 across the next three years, MediaGuardian reported today. According to The Drum, the initiative, which is intended to "revitalize" the title, will be administered by marketing firm The Network

200,000 free copies of the publication will be handed out at major transport outlets to consumers between ages 45 and 60 years across London, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds. In addition, an A4 backboard will be present at newsstands to distinguish Reader's Digest from other titles, The Drum informed.

The larger print will also emerge in the magazine's December issue, to be issued next week. Furthermore, the December issue will have 256 pages, as opposed to the typical 160 pages.

"We have been working hard to evolve the magazine over recent months to ensure that it is as engaging and relevant to our target audience as it possibly can be. I'm excited that this activity will allow us to get the magazine into more people's hands every month, and I look forward to welcoming new readers into the fold," said Editor-in-Chief Gill Hudson.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-08 16:51

The New York Times will expand the news coverage in its DealBook section, as well as redesign its website and begin publishing its content in the print edition of the newspaper, paidContent reported.

The section, which started in 2001 as a daily financial report sent by e-mail, will also provide company profiles and key financial metrics, including "mergers and acquisitions history, top banking and legal relationships, stock ownership, and officers and directors," The New York Times explained in a press release.

"This is the next step in the evolution of DealBook, providing a community of highly-engaged readers and busy executives with essential news and insights, and keeping them plugged in to the most important news of the day," editor Andrew Ross Sorkin said.

In addition to the new design, the section will feature twice a month a column by ProPublica senior reporter Jesse Eisinger. According to ProPublica, he will "focus on accountability issues and abuses of power in the world of high finance." In recent months, The New York Times has been adding staff and contributors to the section.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-05 17:06

Forbes is planning to involve its readers more in both the print and digital versions of its magazine. Lewis DVorkin, chief product officer of Forbes Media, recently wrote about how "At Forbes, we're beginning to open up our print and digital platforms so many more knowledgeable and credible content creators can provide information and perspective and connect with one another," he said.

He noted that with the launch of this year's Forbes 400, reader content began to appear in the pages of the magazine. "What was yesterday's audience is today's cadre of potential experts who can report what they know or filter information for distribution to friends who trust their judgments," he wrote.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-05 15:19

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