Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Circulation and Readership

Twitter plans to launch an Arabic version of its website as well as promoted tweets for the Middle East by 2011, said Twitter co-founder Biz Stone, The National reported last Wednesday.

"People use [Twitter] differently around the world but people also use it similarly," said Stone in an interview. "The key takeaway there is that we've only translated the service into [six languages] ... but we're very keen on opening that up and getting it translated into more regions in the world sooner rather than later."

The microblogging website is already available in English, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish. However, "the use of Arabic-language characters will cause Twitter some technological headaches, much as their Japanese interface did," Fast Company explained.

Currently, Twitter has 175 million registered accounts and, according to Stone, 370,000 people register daily. Nonetheless, the site has low penetration in the Middle East and "faces competition from Watwet, a Twitter-like service in Arabic that by last year had registered about 25,000 users," The National pointed out.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-22 17:52

Less than 1 percent of overall online newspaper views are made on an iPad, according to an infographic published on Monday by The Wall Street Journal, Editor & Publisher reported.

Ninety-seven percent of news readings are done through computers while only 2 percent come from mobiles, The Wall Street Journal revealed. Based on comScore data, the graph shows that iPads are mostly used early in the mornings or at night, which signals "that people use tablets during leisure times," Poynter.org's Damon Kiesow wrote.

Infographic source: The Wall Street Journal

Furthermore, users read news through the computer during working hours, whereas the usage of mobile devices rises in the morning. The graphic provides a valuable insight on the online newspaper consumption, Kiesow said.

"With smart phones, and especially tablets, readers may be more amenable to more focused, less rushed news experiences. So, while a reader may not have time watch a video, or read a long-form news story at work on their computer, they might while sitting on the couch that evening with a tablet."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-22 17:12

Last week, Google announced that it had created new metatags for Google News that would help identify original stories and consequently, which publication got the scoop. The initiative aims to tackle the fact that hundreds of articles will often appear based around one story, and seeks to credit original stories with higher rankings in Google News search results. This change in ranking won't happen immediately: Google first wants to gather enough data to test the method's effectiveness.

The two tags are "syndication-source," which publishers should use to indicated the preferred URL for a syndicated article and 'original-source' which should indicate the URL of the first article to report on this story.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-22 16:12

During the global economic downturn, The New York Times increased its home delivery rate by 5 percent, but only 0.01 percent cancelled, Gerald Marzorati, assistant managing editor for new projects and strategic initiatives at The Times, revealed last week, according to Politico. Why were there so few cancellations?

"I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that they're literally not understanding what they're paying," he said, referring to automatic subscription renewals, according to Slate. "That's the beauty of the credit card."

Those subscribers are paying US$700 or more per year for home delivery.

But savvy consumers can pay much less, Slate pointed out. By calling The Times subscription number, readers can ask to discontinue their subscriptions. When asked why, they can say it's too expensive. The Times employee taking the call will then likely offer them a 50 percent discount. (For the full list of steps, visit the Slate article). However, "as word gets around that The Times habitually charges suckers twice what it charges participants in my recommended 12-step program, the company may have to rethink its variable-pricing strategy," Slate reporter Timothy Noah states.

Marzorati made the comment last week at the Digital Hollywood New York conference in New York City.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-18 16:48

Google will be featuring video clips within its sponsored AdWords results in the United States, Vertical Leap reported yesterday.

The so-called "video extensions" will appear below a given brand's text ads and will play automatically. Users will be able to view the promotional content on an "expandable plusbox." Users can access the advertiser's website through an embedded URL link, EquiMedia informed.

Image: SMSeo

"Video extensions create a richer experience for users and offer more information than text alone can provide. By engaging users with videos on Google.com you're able to combine the benefits of brand advertising with the targeted relevance of search," the company said.

Once the video has been viewed for 10 seconds, advertisers will have to pay the maximum pay-per-click (PPC) fee for the ad click, BD Recruitment explained. Entertainment and technology brands are predicted to be the ones most likely to receive expanded exposure since they could integrate movie trailers and product demonstrations, EquiMedia outlined.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-17 17:21

It would be tempting to assume, especially given the unsurprising fact that The New York Times website ranks number one in terms of worldwide usage, that all of today's most viewed news websites have sprouted from prestigious, well-established, internationally-known print newspapers. Not necessarily the case. In fact, the second most viewed newspaper website worldwide is the UK Daily Mail's online counterpart, Mail Online.

Just how did this middle-range tabloid's website rise from relative obscurity to become the second most popular newspaper site in the world, and the most popular news site in the UK?

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-17 16:36

Russian-language news site Life News announced it is holding an auction from November 10 to December 31, during which readers have the chance to earn some cash from any original visual content they provide for the outlet, Lenta.ru reported today. Depending on the exclusivity of the videos or the images, individuals may earn anywhere between RUB300 (US$9.6 or €7.1) and RUB1 million ($32,000 or €23,700).

Ashot Gabrelyanov, director of the outlet's publishing house News Media Rus, urged readers not to distribute their photographs or video clips on online hosting sites for free but instead to find a way to make money from them, Lenta.ru said. News Media (which also owns newspapers Zhizn and Tvoi Den, magazine Zhara and online business news portal Marker) frequently embarks on lawsuits against companies that violate authors' rights.

According to Lenta.ru, the publisher is currently suing Google's YouTube service for hosting a video clip that was filmed for Life News by one of the site's correspondents. Gabrelyanov explained that this wasn't the first time that YouTube permits the act and that News Media wasn't going "to tolerate such rudeness anymore."

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-16 23:41

Norway's Verdans Gang CEO Torry Pedersen kicked off WAN-IFRA's Readership Conference today in San Francisco by enumerating the multimedia company's focus on readers and users.

"Always a reader knows more than a reporter, always," Pedersen explained, saying that VG has found success inviting participation by readers, especially when big news happens.

For example:

- When the Icelandic ash cloud engulfed Europe and shut down air traffic, VG built a "Hitchhikers Central" website in seven hours, matching people who needed ground transportation with those who can drive them throughout Europe. More than 5,000 connections were made through this service.

- When the swine flu pandemic hit, VG produced a swine flu portal to provide swine flu background, and resources and vaccine information in each Norwegian community. The site received 1.7 million page views.

- VG is ramping up its connections with Facebook and Twitter. Pedersen said a large percentage of linking to stories starts on social networks. VG has attracted 160,000 fans in 18 different VG Facebook groups.

Author

Martha Stone

Date

2010-11-16 19:48

Yahoo! India will expand its website to other six regional languages by 2011 and its looking for local partners to generate content, Reuters reported yesterday.

Besides English, the site also provides information in Hindi as part of a partnership with daily newspaper Dainik Jagran. "We see huge opportunity in regional language content. Our Hindi news traffic had taken over the traffic we see for news in English," said Yahoo! India Managing Director Arun Tadank, the Hindustan Times quoted.

Last week, Yahoo! CEO and President Carol Bartz announced the company's plan to increase local content in India by expanding the website to at least 18 regional languages, CIOL News Report pointed out.

"We aim to become the world's largest digital media company," she said adding that it could only be done through partnerships. "You need to understand that you cannot build everything," Bartz said, The Financial Express reported.

According to the Hindustan Times, India has 50 million Internet users, which are expected to increase up to 240 million in the next five years. Currently, 73 percent of the users has access to Yahoo!.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-16 17:20

Last week, just hours after News Limited announced it would launch iPad apps for two of its Australian tabloids, James Murdoch, CEO of News Corp. in Europe and Asia and son of News Ltd's owner Rupert Murdoch, said sales of newspaper apps were cannibalizing the print version of the dailies.

But before apps as we know them even existed, it was once thought that free websites cannibalized print newspapers. At the time, Rupert Murdoch was one of the loudest voices against free online content. Today he is putting complete paywalls around News Corp.'s UK sites, TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk.

Image: Huffington Post
But last week, when James Murdoch voiced his opinions on apps, he also said free websites might not really cannibalize print after all.

"The problem with the apps is they're much more directly cannibalistic of the core print product than the website," he said at the Monaco Media Forum, according to our sister publication, editorsweblog.org. "People interact with it much more like they do with the traditional product."

Reuters Blogs' Felix Salmon opined Friday that James Murdoch is likely only half right:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-15 22:57

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