Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Circulation and Readership

EveryBlock.com, the Chicago-based hyperlocal site for 16 U.S. cities, serves up news, down to the block level. It's a job many believe newspapers should be doing, including Everyblock founder Adrian Holovaty. So why aren't newspapers doing it?

"Some newspapers in the states want to do this work, but it's still pretty rare," he told the World Editors Forum study tour at the EveryBlock office today.

The work, done by six full-time EveryBlock employees, serves up information like crime data, property transfers, building permits, restaurant reviews, inspection reports, real estate listings and local deals, all by geographical location, and organized by time, with the most recent data appearing at the top of the page.

For crime data, EveryBlock must get the raw data from the city's police department. For restaurant inspections, it must do the same with the health department. News from newspaper and other websites are the easiest and most scalable to get.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-02 18:54

The most popular newspaper in the UK, the Daily Telegraph, said it has not yet decided whether to install a paywall, Reuters reported.

"Absolutely no decisions have been made on the introduction of a paid-content model," publisher Telegraph Media Group explained in an e-mail. "Like all publishers, TMG continually evaluates the developments in the digital sector."

On Tuesday, The Financial Times published an article in which an anonymous source said the newspaper was going to start charging for content next year. "It will be a metered system or, less likely, micropayments," said the insider, pointing out that it would not follow the paywall model used by Rupert Murdoch's The Times and News of The World.

According to The Guardian, the The Telegraph is more interested in the pay system that The New York Times is expected to launch in 2011, which that gives users some articles for free.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-01 23:57

Jennifer Preston's appointment as social media editor at the New York Times attracted considerable attention when it was announced last year: mainly, because the concept of the role was still new, but also because she wasn't what one might expect in what is often seen as a young, techy position. As she told the World Editors Forum study tour participants today, she had no presence in social media before she took the job, didn't have a smart phone and barely even texted.

There is a clear logic to appointing somebody with a similar profile, however. By learning everything from scratch themselves they will have more of an understanding about what difficulties people may encounter, and they are arguably likely to have more success persuading other non-social media users to change their habits.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-01 16:07

The ease and low cost of publishing content on the web has meant firstly that anyone can do it, and secondly that companies have taken advantage of this ease coupled with people's desire to publish their writing to generate income. These 'content farms' - such as Demand Media - churn out large amounts of content a day, which is highly optimized for search and therefore consistently appears high in search results, leading to criticism from newspaper publishers that they are threatening traditional journalism.

One company that offers a similar service to writers is Vancouver-based Suite101. But Suite101 is not a content farm, said its CEO Peter Berger. "We see ourselves as a service for writers and contributors," and "we see the writers as the core of our company, so we look at where they can create value."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-30 16:23

Wikileaks has struck again, this time releasing a quarter of a million confidential US diplomatic cables to select news organisations. After several days of anticipation following the US state department's warning to Congress on 24 November, The Guardian, The New York Times, Der Spiegel, Le Monde and El Pais published their first stories yesterday.

Wikileaks itself is publishing the cables in batches over the next few months. "The subject matter of these cables is of such importance, and the geographical spread so broad, that to do otherwise would not do this material justice," said the organisation's dedicated site for this leak. It is the largest classified information release so far. The site allows users to browse the cables by date or by origin.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-29 22:43

The oldest newspaper in Indiana will begin delivering in the mornings instead of later in the day, and will also close its Monday edition in order to publish on Saturdays instead, The Associated Press reported today.

The changes at the Vincennes Sun-Commercial will begin Dec. 11, and were implemented because readers and advertisers prefer getting their news earlier in the day, as well as having an edition on Saturday, publisher Rob Eilts said.

The newspaper already publishes a Sunday edition, and will be able to offer readers coverage of Friday night sports the first thing Saturday morning, Editor Gayle Robbins told the AP in an article published by the Chicago Tribune.

The newspaper's online edition has a closed paywall. When readers click on a headline, they are directed to a login page or asked to select a subscription service: US$1 per day, $5.70 per month, $17.10 for three months, $34.20 for six months and $68.40 for a year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-29 21:22

The time audiences spend with mainstream media coverage of elections is declining in Australia, The Australian reported today.

When looking at newspaper, television, radio and online, political scientist Sally Young found that some television and newspaper audiences may be migrating online, but the percentage of people saying they use the Internet "many times" for election news rose from 0 percent in 1987 to just 5 percent 20 years later. Specifically in print, the research shows that the number of hard political stories is down, in proportion of total print content; however, some newspapers are doing "much more" online, she said.

Image: Sally Young's book, "How Australia Decides: Election Reporting and the Media" will be published in December

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-29 16:07

Online videos, including that from YouTube, Netflix and other sites with Flash video, takes up 37 percent of Internet traffic during peak television-watching hours in the United States, TechCrunch reported.

When broken down by top Web video players, 10 percent comes from YouTube, 21 percent comes from Netflix and 6 percent comes from Flash Video. Meanwhile, all HTTP Web traffic is just 23 percent of the total.

Image: Shaping the Future of the Newspaper's World Digital Media Trends report 2009, (c) WAN-IFRA
But that doesn't mean the main activity on the Web is watching videos. Traffic is measured by bandwidth used and how many bits are transferred, TechCrunch explains. Streaming video requires more bits than just loading a Web page; thus, "video is hogging up the bandwidth."

However, North American Internet users are behind other regions in terms of consumption, Multichannel explained. In the Asia-Pacific region, the median is 12 gigabytes. The global average last year was three gigabytes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-26 16:08

Search engine optimisation (SEO) has become a much used word in the online publishing world, and it has also been something most news publishers aim for. In fact, for many publishers, SEO has become too important - more so than even the content itself, according to Ben Elowitz, co-founder of online luxury goods retailer Blue Nile, co-founder and CEO of Web publisher Wetpaint and author of the Digital Quarters blog.

"But this movement toward SEO has been dangerous, as it's moved publishers' eye off their most important job of creating great content, and onto the false goals of keywords, hacks, paid links, and technical engineering that their audience doesn't know or care about," he wrote in a column for paidContent.

He continued:

"But the recent announcement of the Facebook/Bing partnership to integrate social and search results clearly marks the beginning of the end of SEO, and the smartest digital publishers will drop everything to rethink their distribution strategy entirely.

"With the rise of Facebook, we've entered a new era of digital media: personalized discovery. The balance of power is shifting: Already sites at Wetpaint and other publishers are seeing more audience coming from Facebook than from search...

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-24 17:05

People in Spain like to read newspapers, and the growing tendency is to read them online rather than their print version, according to the 2010 Report of the Digital Content Industry published by Spain's National Observatory of Telecomunications and Information Society.

In fact, 49.7 percent of the population reads newspapers online mostly through computers. The study showed that only 7.1 percent of the users access daily publications with mobile devices.

Photo source: re-nest.com
The report also revealed that the economic crisis has reduced newspapers' advertising revenue from €1,461 million in 2007 to €883.7 million in 2009, leaving the newspaper sales as the main source of revenue with €1.215 million.

In 2009, newspapers represented 41.1 percent of the publishing sector overall income, calculated in €7.128 million, PRNoticias.com pointed out. This means that newspapers brought €2.929 million into Spain's publishing industry.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-24 16:01

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