Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Circulation and Readership

For more than a year, coverage of the New York Times as a business has been relentlessly about its "metered model" pay wall and other digital matters. But without any media news notice, the newspaper has engineered a coup on the legacy side of its operations.

Essentially, it has replaced telemarketing as a source of selling new subscriptions with "events marketing" -- pitching a booth at a well-trafficked venue like the U.S. Open tennis tournament or the South by Southwest conference in Austin and trying to sign up passers-by.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-24 11:28

At Miratech, we are interested in the difference between reading on an iPad and a printed newspaper.

Readers remember an article read in a newspaper better than an article read on an iPad. Readers are more likely to skim over articles on an iPad than in a newspaper.

Continue reading on miratech.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-23 16:47

Twenty-five thousand people read The Times on iPad each day. Its stablemate The Sunday Times counts 22,000 readers, including two million iPad page views.

Those numbers may sound small (in print, the papers circulate an average 446,109 per day and 1,031,727 on Sunday). But they're a start and they point to the popularity of iPad within the new multi-platform paid ecosystem.

Continue reading on paidContent:UK

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-13 10:56

Here are three seemingly unrelated things you notice this only-in-America week. One is the rise and rise of the Wall Street Journal, up 1.2% (to 2,117,796 average copies a day) on the latest US ABC figures. Another is the impressive run of newspaper front pages posted outside the plush new Newseum in Washington DC, proclaiming Osama's death. And the third is yet another brooding prophecy of the demise of printed newspapers (this time from Ken Doctor, one of the leading US media analysts).

Continue reading in Peter Preston on press and broadcasting

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-09 17:25

Years in the making, a complex new set of rules for measuring newspaper circulation officially launched with the release today of results for the six-month period that ended March 31. Total paid circulation is gone as the top-line measure. In its place is a summary number for total average circulation, both paid and "verified."

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-05 09:24

While newspaper circulation in much of the world declines, it continues to grow in India. And the prospect for future growth is excellent, says Ravi Dhariwal, CEO of Bennet, Coleman & Co., the publisher of The Times of India.

Mr Dhariwal delivered the keynote address at WAN-IFRA's Publish Asia 2011, being held in Bangkok from 27 to 29 April.
India's population continues to grow, as does its literacy rate, so future readership is also likely to increase, he says. Advertising growth also has great potential.

For the Times of India, it's all about brand, he says. The 173-year old paper "tries to capture our country on a particular day and the people's aspirations," he says. We don't consider the Prime Minister or the President as the leaders of India, we treat the reader as the CEO."

In a wide-ranging keynote address that presented a case study of the Times' success, Mr Dhariwal pointed to the following elements that characterizes the Times of India brand:

- It doesn't take itself too seriously. "While we do a lot of serious stuff, we don't take ourselves too seriously at all," he says. "We try a lot of different things and have fun. It generates a tremendous response."
- It has an optimistic outlook.
- It celebrates success.
- In believes in diversity.
- It provides shorter stories.
- It is affordable.
- It establishes connections. "We believe a lot of people have things to say - they're not writers, they're not editors. But we invite guest editors to have free rein to make the newspaper they like."

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-28 17:23

Mail Online, Associated Newspapers' online network, has overtaken the Huffington Post to become the second most popular news website in the world in March, according to new figures from metrics firm comScore.

Arianna Huffington's groundbreaking news and opinion website, which was bought by AOL for $315m (£193m) in February, was leapfrogged by Mail Online, which is now second only to the New York Times in ComScore's "newspapers" category.

Continue reading on MediaGuardian

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-20 10:33

The debate over print versus digital isn't useful anymore, says Kevin Beatty, CEO of A&N Media and Managing Director of Associated Newspapers in the United Kingdom, in a keynote address to some 250 participants from 39 countries attending the first WAN-IFRA Digital Media Europe conference.

"We consider it pointless and an unnecessary introspection," he says. "Instead we have sought to change our business in anticipation of our customers' expectations.

"Although there remain many uncertainties, the one thing that we are sure of is that change, although always a constant, will continue at a phenomenal rate and we need to keep up."

A&N Media, the parent company of The Mail and other titles, reaches 41 percent of all adults in the UK every month across its platforms. Thanks to multimedia, newspaper companies now reach larger audiences than ever.

And these audiences are no longer described by geography, Mr Beatty says - of the 65 million unique users of Mail Online monthly, 42 percent come from outside the United Kingdom.

But building an audience isn't an end in itself, Mr Beatty says. It is interaction among its brands and platforms that is proving to be profitable. "Brand interaction builds a richer, more valuable customer profile," he says.

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-11 16:52

By Tabelo Timse (AFP)

JOHANNESBURG -- Five newspapers line a vendor's makeshift table built from cardboard and sticks but most customers go straight for Isolezwe, one of South Africa's growing Zulu-language dailies.

"I guess people feel comfortable reading in their language," says Blessings Kupe from his stand at a busy Johannesburg taxi rank where he offers the country's most-read papers, all English titles like Daily Sun and The Star.

Continue reading on Google

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-05 09:10

The Times had an average daily sale of 445,962 in February. The equivalent figure for The Daily Telegraph was 628,338. Not all that much difference, you might say. And yet the financial fortunes of the two papers are very unalike.

Continue reading in The Independent

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-22 17:30

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation