Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


Business

There’s nothing unusual about newsroom cuts these days, but that doesn’t help make them any less painful. And last week, that pain seems to have been particularly widespread. Media Bistro reported on Thursday that Bloomberg TV is cutting 30 staff positions, and CNN has let “dozens” of staff go from its two documentary units. A couple days earlier, as we reported, the LA Times also laid off between 12 and 20 staff members. On the other side of the Atlantic, The Guardian reports that media group Northern & Shell will be eliminating around 70 editorial posts across the Daily Express, Sunday Express, Daily Star and Daily Star Sunday.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 15:02

The American Press Institute is ceasing independent operations today after 66 years as a centre for journalism training and career development, reports the Washington Post.

In a move first announced in January, the API is merging with the Newspaper Association of America Foundation, a tax-exempt unit of America’s largest trade organisation for the newspaper industry.

The interim executive director of API Carol Ann Riordan reassures readers on API’s website that, as the two groups merge, “training, leadership development and best practices will be key activities of the new organization.”

As part of the move, API’s iconic building is being sold and its eight full-time staff and one part-time employee have been laid off, writes The Washington Post.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-23 18:36

The Associated Press announced today that Gary Pruitt, the chairman, president and CEO of The McClatchy Co., will become its newest chief executive officer in July, succeeding current President and CEO Tom Curley upon his retirement, The New York Times Media Decoder blog reported.

McClatchy owns 30 daily papers and is the third largest US newspaper publisher. Pruitt will be succeeded by Pat Talamantes as the new CEO of McClatchy and byKevin McClatchy as chairman, the article said.

Pruitt, who spent 28 years at McClatchy, is no stranger to the AP, serving on its Board of Directors for nine years, according to an AP press release. He also formerly served as a chair of the Newspaper Association of America.

In the press release, Pruitt praised Curley’s tenure as chief executive, as well as the digital direction the AP has embraced in recent years.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-22 18:59

The Wrap reported yesterday that the LA Times is laying off between 12 and 20 staff members in a fresh round of redundancies. A spokeswoman from the Times, who is quoted by The Wrap, says the redundancies “are primarily editorial positions," although she added, "some are administration, some are copy desk, some are design, some are news operations."

The Wrap writes that arts and entertainment editor Craig Turner, who has worked for the Times for more than 40 years, and Shari Roan, who has reported for the paper’s health section for 22 years, are among those who will be leaving.

As Kevin Roderick at LA Observed notes, last month the standalone Health section for which Roan used to write was scrapped along with the Food and Home sections. All have now been merged into a new “lifestyle” section published on Saturdays.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-21 18:39

Sunday is not a day of rest when it comes to newspaper sales in the US. The newly published annual Pew report on the state of the American media has highlighted that despite the problems that print newspapers are facing in the US, Sunday print editions are continuing to do relatively well. Sunday circulation has stabilised and has even gone up at some papers. What’s more, Pew writes that as print ad revenues plummet, Sunday preprint insert advertising has proved comparatively resilient.

Presumably to capitalise on this trend, the Wall Street Journal has established a partnership with 62 local papers, which each weekend publish between two and four pages of content about business and personal finance produced by WSJ writers. Jeff Roberts writes for paidContent that the articles are not reproduced from the Journal, but written specifically to target a wider, lower-earning audience.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-20 17:06

There’s little doubt that learning new digital skills while coping with fewer resources has put newsrooms everywhere under pressure.

The annual Pew report on the state of the American media noted today that, “a number of fourth-quarter announcements of layoffs, wage freezes, furloughs and internal cost-reduction task forces suggests that the intense pressure to do more with less while finding some money for new efforts is probably industry-wide.”

What does this mean for journalists who are being paid significantly less to work longer hours? In the case of one former reporter for the Chicago Tribune’s TribLocal, it has led to legal action. The Chicago Tribune reported at the end of last month that Carolyn Rusin, who was employed as a staff reporter for TribLocal between July 2010 and October 2011, was filing a lawsuit stating that she regularly worked more than 40 hours a week, but was only paid for five hours of overtime in 2011.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-19 18:02

The UK’s National Union of Journalists would like to bid goodbye to Trinity Mirror CEO Sly Bailey

Under the headline “Bye bye Sly?”, the NUJ writes that her cost-cutting policies at Trinity Mirror, which publishes five national titles and over 130 regional and local papers, are “killing off local and regional press with dire consequences”.

The union has complied a dossier, examining the consequences of cuts imposed by Bailey across Trinity Mirror titles. These include staff shortages, cuts to the number of photographers, and a reduction in the number of newspaper vendors.

The NUJ quotes one representative from the Birmingham Post & Mail, who says that as a consequence of the cuts “staff are increasingly going for easy stories.” The rep states, “some good, but not explosive stories are missed because we do not have production staff able to make late changes to the paper. We no longer routinely cover the transport authority. All this means that community or grassroots news has suffered and we are becoming increasingly reliant on reader generated news and pictures.”

Similar stories are shared by staff at other local Trinity Mirror titles, such as the Huddersfield Examiner and Trinity Mirror Southern.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-14 14:22

The news industry is transitioning from print to digital, and nobody said it was going to be easy. For one thing, many news publications still simply make more money from the shrinking paper side of their business than from the growing digital end. But as newspapers struggle to make the switch, perhaps part of the problem isn’t financial; it’s that newrooms are hooked on print. 

This is the argument made by two recent articles, one published by Nieman Lab, the other by Poynter, which suggest that journalists have been struggling to prioritise digital content because their professional environments reward them for achievements in the printed paper, but don’t incentivise their work online. 

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-13 18:04

Around 250 Financial Times journalists are planning to strike for two hours at 3pm today over an on-going pay dispute.

The National Union of Journalists writes that, after long talks between its representatives and FT management at the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service yesterday, no resolution was reached over the paper’s controversial pay deal.

The FT Group, which posted a 27% increase in profits in its end-of-year results last month, offered FT journalists a payrise of 2%, out of a 3.5% increase to the payroll.

FT CEO John Ridding told paidContent last month that staff earning under £50,000 a year will be given an extra half-percent rise, and 1% of the money set aside for pay-rises will be awarded for special merit. 

The NUJ has called the proposals, which single out "star" performers for more pay, “deeply divisive and an attack on union collective bargaining”.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-13 15:09

People aren't just talking about news organisations switching to digital any more; evidence that it's happening is all around.

Pearson announced on Monday that its digital revenues have risen by 18%, and now make up 33% of the company's total sales. The firm, which owns of the Financial Times, reported that the FT Group now draws 47% of its revenue from digital and services, compared to just 25% in 2007. Digital subscribers now make up 44% of the Financial Times paid circulation.

Earlier last month, the international media group Future PLC announced that it had succeeded in offsetting the decline in its print earnings in the UK, where the company has 75% of its business, with an increase in digital revenues.

Digital ad spend is gaining over print. A report from eMarketer last month predicted that online ad spending in the US will overtake print in 2012. The digital analysis company estimated that the amount of money spent on online ads in America last year totaled $32.03 billion, and is expected to grow by another 23.3% this year, to total $39.5 billion.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-02 13:31

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