Date

Sat - 23.09.2017


Business

Daily Mail & General Trust has bought up the international recruitment site Jobrapido for €30 million, the company announced on Monday.

DMGT stated that its subsidiary A&N Media, which operates Daily Mail publisher Associated Newspapers and regional newspaper publisher Northcliffe Media, will combine Jobrapido with its existing recruitment business, which includes the UK recruitment platform Jobsite, and the international sites OilCareers and Broadbean. With the acquisition of Jobrapido, the recruitment group is being rebranded under the name ‘Evenbase’.

The company may be hoping that the purchase will reduce the impact of its shrinking local news publishing business. As we reported earlier, DMGT published its half-year financial report yesterday, revealing that revenue at Northcliffe Media has dropped by 10%, advertising by 11% and advertising by 5%. The company announced growth in digital revenues at Associated Newspapers, which publishes Mail Online, but it predicted that its operating profits and pre tax profits would be less this year than in the first half of 2011.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-18 12:18

In 2012, Aftonbladet in Sweden will cross a digital-print barrier that most publishers are dreaming about: Its digital advertising revenues will exceed those from print.

Anders Berglund (right in photo), Sales Director of Aftonbladet, and Kalle Jungkvist, Senior Advisor of Schibsted Media Group, publisher of Aftonbladet, said the Scandinavian publishing pioneers are not resting on their laurels as the company intends to ramp up all sales activities.

“Growth and reach are at the core of our strategy,” said Jungkvist. “We see so many opportunities to commercialise our business on all the emerging digital platforms.”

Aftonbladet has a daily print circulation of 260,000, and more than 50 per cent of the population visits its website weekly. Schibsted launched its freemium model in 2002 and has attracted 150,000 subscribers, features other paid services and in total makes up about 25 percent of revenues.

It doesn’t hurt that the company has the ever-evolving and growing online classified portal Blocket in its portfolio; 7 out of 10 Swedes have sold or purchased something on the site. Schibsted owns about 25 companies in various fields of content and advertising that give it a strong foundation from which to expand.

For more on this story, please see our Digital Media Europe blog.

Author

Dean Roper

Date

2012-04-17 09:27

By the end of next month, five Johnston Press daily local papers will begin publishing in print just once a week and will distribute daily news on digital platforms only, the company announced today.

The changes were already suggested last month, when CEO of Johnston Press Ashley Highfield told paidContent: “we’re going to flip the model from newspaper-first every day to digital-first.” Highfield suggested that in the future Johnston press papers would “produce a bumper weekly in print. By 2020, that will be the model. We’ve run the numbers and think that can be a profitable model.”

Although the nature of the re-launches at Johnston Press are not surprising, the speed with which they are being implemented is more of a shock. According to the company’s press release, Johnston Press intends to radically redesign all of its 170 titles by the end of the year to make them “platform neutral.” Further details of Johnston Press’s new digital publishing strategy will announced on 25th April, when the company is due to release its annual results.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-16 16:24

With the rise of digital technology, and the decline of print, is publishing even a business any more? Digital media guru Clay Shirky, quoted in a recent article by Mathew Ingram for GigaOm, suggests maybe not.

“Publishing is going away. Because the word ‘publishing’ means a cadre of professionals who are taking on the incredible difficulty and complexity and expense of making something public,” writes Shirky in an article for the social reading service Findings.com. ‘That’s not a job anymore. That’s a button. There’s a button that says “publish,” and when you press it, it’s done.”

Shirky continues that, in the past “we had a class of people called publishers because it took special professional skill to make words and images visible to the public. Now it doesn’t take professional skills. It doesn’t take any skills. It takes a WordPress install.”

In his article commenting on Shirky’s piece, Ingram points out that the statement is a “bit disingenuous.” He argues that, in fact, publishing books, magazines and newspapers normally requires more sophisticated tools than a blog platform.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-13 16:50

There is one week left to apply for the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) 2012 Mobile News Grants and Training Scheme, which provides newspaper companies in Sub-Saharan Africa with an opportunity to develop or expand their mobile platforms.

The project aims to increase accessibility of news across mobile platforms in Africa and offer increased news services to communities that may be otherwise underserved. Participating newspapers will receive funding, consultation and training to develop their mobile businesses.

Mobile News for Africa grants were made to nine newspapers last year, resulting in the development of 10 mobile news applications. WAN-IFRA will be selecting five more newspapers to participate in 2012 and is accepting applications from those seeking to develop new mobile platforms or improve or expand existing platforms.

The project has also produced a handbook,  “Mobile Media Services at Sub-Saharan African Newspapers: a Guide to Implementing Mobile News and Mobile Business,” co-published by WAN-IFRA and the African Media Initiative. The handbook can be downloaded without charge from http://tinyurl.com/4y9dcth

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-13 14:30

Like many media companies, the Telegraph in the United Kingdom is developing its digital business in many directions – mobile, tablets, video, subscriptions, data -- all at the same time.

“Do yourself a favour, the first area you need to transform is the technology area,” says Allan Marshall, a consultant who is helping the Telegraph make the transformation.

Mr Marshall, Joint Principal of Australia-based iMedia Advisory, is a strong advocate of outsourcing technological needs. “If anyone says you have to have the technology development in-house, I’m sorry, but they’re taking you back to the past,” he says.

Outsourcing the technological solutions will reduce personnel, save money and allow you to do more at once, he says.

“The days of having technology in-house means you were restricted,” he says. “If the team was focused on a major project, all other projects were put aside.”

“You need to work with outside partners – it will save you money. You’ll get arguments from the IT department, but it doesn’t hold water.”

Mr Marshall’s wide-ranging presentation of The Telegraph’s current digital transformation illustrated just how quickly the news media world is changing.

“It’s all about information and data being at the heart of what we do,” said Mr Marshall. “You need to look at a clear strategy, focused at the customer. And if you don’t do that, you’re in trouble. You also have to look at your quality.  Focus on quality, and give the audience what they want.”

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-13 09:26

Fairfax Media has been publishing newspapers in Australia since before there was an Australia – so making the change from a newspaper company to a multimedia company is no easy matter.

But there isn’t any choice, says Jack Matthew, Chief Executive Officer for Australia-based Fairfax’s Metro Media, the keynote speaker at Publish Asia. Not because of audience decline – it has actually increased – but because the revenue model has changed.

Print audience is declining, but, thanks to digital media, the overall audience grew 30 per cent over the past five years, he said.

“We don’t have a content problem. More people consume our content today than ever have in the past,” he said. “What we have is a business model problem.”

Like a lot of media companies, Fairfax faces the “print dollars, digital cents” conundrum – the revenues that come from digital advertising and audiences is not replacing those lost to print.

Mr Matthew believes Fairfax has come up with a solution: maintain quality journalism as the “secret sauce” as the core of the business, but change the way of looking at the audience.

He believes that only by changing the traditional metric based on circulation to one based on overall audience can newspaper companies succeed – “not talking about platforms but talking about eyeballs.” He said the goal is to “sell targeted eyeballs across all platforms in a highly engaged atmosphere”.

“That won’t only protect your yield, it will grow your yield,” he said.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-11 09:31

From East Coast business practices to Silicon Valley technology, European publishers have long looked to the US as a source of inspiration. But now, as media companies everywhere are seeking different ways to adapt to the new digital era, some European firms are coming up with smart solutions, which American news organisations could well learn from.

This is the argument made by media analyst Ken Doctor in a series of articles for Nieman Lab. Doctor, who is the author of Newsonomics: Twelve New Trends That Will Shape the News You Get, highlights examples of media companies that are thriving in Europe, including Schibsted in Norway, which has diversified into digital services and online classifieds, Gossweiler Media in Switzerland, which has created a successful community news model, and Sanoma in Finland, which has successfully persuaded print readers to pay more for digital access.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-10 16:43

Newspapers no longer just cover sports – they compete with them.

The footballer Cristiano Ronaldo has 42 million fans on Facebook. Nike puts out a sports magazine as good as any done by the traditional press. Fan sites are the go-to destination for millions who once turned to newspapers as the primary source for sports news.

When athletes, teams, sports organisations and sporting good companies become publishers themselves, the fundamental relationship between sport and media changes. Do they even need traditional media anymore? Sports editors and media executives gathered in Madrid last week to discuss how they can successfully compete with these new challengers.

A report on their discussions can be downloaded, without charge, from: http://www.wan-ifra.org/events/3rd-international-sports-news-conference.

For more on this story, please see our main WAN-IFRA website.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-04 11:07

Google+ has come in for a lot of flack. It’s been called a “ghost town” by various news organisations and one viral image explaining social networks through the medium of donuts (of all things!) implied that while every other social platform serves a obvious purpose, the only people using Google+ were Google+ employees.

Speaking at the Social Media World Forum in London today, Chris Brogan, president of Human Business Works and author of Google Plus for Business, makes the case that businesses – and by extension publishers – should be thinking about Google+.

Brogan argues:

1)   Google is the biggest search engine in the world. But Google knows that links aren’t the only way people go to content, so it’s building its social presence. Google has been forcibly integrating Google+ into its search results through “social search plus your world” (although the function can be turned off) which means that what people’s friends say about your brand on Google+ affects how visible your search is. Don’t miss out on that business.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-27 11:05

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