Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Business

Financially speaking, this seems to have been a mixed week for the LA Times. On the one hand, Fishbowl LA reported on Tuesday that the LA Times Magazine, which has been running for almost three years in its current form, will shut down next month due to a tough market. On the other, the LA Times announced this Thursday that it has received $1m of funding from the Ford Foundation to strengthen its reporting of beats including immigration, minority communities and Brazil.

First to the bad news. Fishbowl LA quotes the editor of the LA Times Magazine, Nancie Clare, who attributes the closure to a lack of funds. “I think it’s fair to say there were revenue issues,” says Clare, “it’s still a tough economic climate, especially for print. I don’t think they got rid of us because they don’t like us.” Fishbowl LA writes that the monthly magazine’s seven staff will be laid off, and there’s “no indication” that jobs in other parts of the newsroom will be made available to them. “They’re contracting in the newsroom too. There’s nowhere to absorb us,” says Clare, quoted in the article.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-18 15:14

The mobile newsreader app Flipboard announced this week that it is partnering with SoundCloud, NPR and PRI in order to fully integrate audio content into its app. The new feature will allow Flipboard users to listen to music and radio content while flipping through articles.

The BBC points out that Flipboard is the first mobile reading app of its kind to integrate audio in this way. Although other social readers such as Pulse and Zite may include some links to audio elements, Flipboard is the first to make audio content an integral part of its product.

As the company explains in its press release, the new feature allows users to explore audio content, select tracks and listen to them, then continue to flip through text stories. Audio tracks are sorted into sections, and the app will continue to play though all the tracks in the same category as users read articles. "With this latest addition, we're giving our readers a personal soundtrack to their Flipboard," says the company’s founder Mike McCue.

The BBC writes that Flipboard is hoping its new audio content will help boost ad revenue. “Adding audio is an attempt at reeling in users and keeping them around longer in a bid, ultimately, to attract brand advertising,” the article says.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-16 17:45

Are things looking good for The New York Times?

Peter Kafka writes for All Things D that, according to Barclays analyst Kannan Venkateshwar, the Times’ circulation growth may start balancing out its advertising losses by the middle of 2014.

Venkateshwar’s prediction suggests that the Times’ paywall, which boasts 450,000 subscribers, is starting to pay off. More than that, it may be seen as a vindication of the Times’ digital strategy, which drew criticism after the paper posted a year-on-year decline in digital advertising revenue last month.

When the drop was announced, paidContent noted that, even though Times’ subscription revenue increased by 9.7% from the previous year, the results were “worrisome for a news industry staking its future on digital revenue.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-15 16:42

Publishers have spent a long time considering the financial implications of moving from print to digital. But there’s also another important question to consider: what is the environmental impact of the switch?

A new SFN report is being put together, which will examine this issue in detail. The project will present summaries of six studies into the environmental impact of different news channels, and will address difficulties in the ways that these impacts are measured.

Featuring tables, illustrations and graphs, the report will compare the carbon footprint generated by various means of publishing, and will also look into the environmental effect of business meetings at publishing companies. The project is being conducted in cooperation with WAN-IFRA’s Growing Green initiative, which promotes and investigates environmentally friendly publishing practices.

The report will be edited by Malin Picha, who worked as editor for various magazines and newspapers in Sweden, before becoming a project manager at the Swedish Media Publishers’ Association. After first researching the development of electronic paper and e-readers in Sweden, Picha later shifted her focus to more environmental projects. She is currently writing her licentiate thesis in media technology with focus on environmental impacts.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-15 09:53

Last February, the print edition of the left-leaning Spanish daily Público was closed down, after its bankrupt parent company Mediapubli failed to come up with enough funds to maintain it. Now a group of Público’s former journalists have formed a co-operative, and want to buy up the paper’s still-functioning website publico.es.

Working through the co-operative “Cooperativa Integral Catalana”, these former journalists aim to purchase publico.es, and to launch a new, weekly print edition of the paper. If this plan works, “other channels and formats have not been ruled out, once these first two are consolidated,” says the group, which promotes its cause under the name “Más Público”.

The co-operative has now made an offer to the commercial court, which is handling the sale of publico.es, to buy the site for a total of 240,000 euros. Although the former editor of Público, Trini Deiros, told El Mundo “our offer has been evaluated very positively by the bankruptcy administers,” the group will not know whether their bid has been successful until May 22, the deadline for the court’s decision.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-11 17:24

Hearing that niche sites are the future of online news is nothing new. “Write to people’s passion, and they will gobble up just about anything,” was one of the survival tips that news site designer Stijn Debrouwere gave to publishers in a recent blog post about the state of modern journalism. “MacRumors and many other niche sites do this,” he observed.

However, an article published by paidContent yesterday suggested that, while they might be popular, many of these niche sites have trouble actually making money. “We noticed digital publishers, especially in Europe, were struggling to build digital businesses,” former Brightcove vice president Rags Gupta told paidContent.

To address this problem, former executives from DoubleClick, Demand Media and BrightCove have created a start-up named RollUp Media, and which aims to help niche online publishers monetize their content, says the article.

“Niche sites may have websites, blogs and a Twitter presence but they don’t know much about SEO and monetisation,” states Gupta. He tells paidContent, “We have built a platform that covers all aspects of content: creation, distribution and monetisation.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-11 11:30

After launching less than a year and a half ago, paid digital content service Ongo is shutting down. The company, which aggregates news from around 40 publishers, presents it in a user-friendly, add-free format, and charges readers a subscription for it, will shut shop by the end of this month, reported Nieman Lab yesterday.

Ongo’s closure represents a bad bet made by some of the traditional news industry’s biggest players: The New York Times, Gannett and The Washington Post each contributed $4m to the company when it was launched.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-09 14:11

Late last Thursday Trinity Mirror’s CEO Sly Bailey announced that she would resign, facing the growing prospect of a shareholder rebellion over the size of her pay package, The Telegraph reports.  

Since Bailey took control of Trinity Mirror in 2003, she has taken home £14m in salary and bonuses, writes The Telegraph. In the same period, the publisher of the Daily and Sunday Mirror, The Daily Record, The People and a string of UK regional papers, has seen its share price drop by 90%. The Telegraph adds that Trinity Mirror’s pre-tax profits fell by 40% to £74m in 2011. Yet despite this drop, Press Gazette reports that during the past year Bailey was paid a total £1.3m in salary, shares and pension contributions, down from total of £1.7m in 2010.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-07 14:43

It’s easy to find pessimistic statements about the impossibility of traditional newspapers making real money from online news. But the gloom isn’t everywhere. Mail Online’s publisher Martin Clarke told investors last Wednesday that the newspaper website is expecting to become profitable for the first time this year.

According to paidContent, Clarke stated that the site expects to break even this year, with revenues of £25m. This figure is expected to rise to £45m in 2013 and £100m within the next five years. Clarke shares these projections despite the fact that, last November, Martin Morgan, CEO of Mail Online’s parent company DGMT, said that “profitability on a meaningful scale is not going to be until 2013 or so,” according to paidContent.  

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-23 16:57

The Chinese Communist party newspaper People’s Daily has raised 1.4 billion yuan ($219 - $222 million) after filing an Initial Public Offering (IPO) for its website www.people.com.cn. As The Financial Times reported on Friday, this figure is almost three times the paper’s initial target of 527m yuan. The FT writes that people.com.cn now has a market capitalisation of $876m – rivalling that of The New York Times, which is valued at $943m.

The FT suggests that the Chinese authorities are hoping that the IPO will help state media expand their global influence. The financial paper points out that although state Chinese media have been commercially successful, tehy is vastly overshadowed by private Chinese digital companies like Sina and Tecent. Now, however, the Chinese state media seem to be looking to compete more aggressively. The FT quotes People’s Daily, which states, “we need to increase our popularity, expand the range of products and services we offer, reach a wider audience and increase page hits per visitor.” With the apparent aim of expanding its editorial impact, Chinese state television is also constructing a broadcasting centre in Washington, notes The FT.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-23 13:25

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation