Date

Sun - 20.08.2017


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People aren't just talking about news organisations switching to digital any more; evidence that it's happening is all around.

Pearson announced on Monday that its digital revenues have risen by 18%, and now make up 33% of the company's total sales. The firm, which owns of the Financial Times, reported that the FT Group now draws 47% of its revenue from digital and services, compared to just 25% in 2007. Digital subscribers now make up 44% of the Financial Times paid circulation.

Earlier last month, the international media group Future PLC announced that it had succeeded in offsetting the decline in its print earnings in the UK, where the company has 75% of its business, with an increase in digital revenues.

Digital ad spend is gaining over print. A report from eMarketer last month predicted that online ad spending in the US will overtake print in 2012. The digital analysis company estimated that the amount of money spent on online ads in America last year totaled $32.03 billion, and is expected to grow by another 23.3% this year, to total $39.5 billion.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-02 13:31

By Emma Heald

The Huffington Post UK has launched a new 'Inspiration' section on its site which will enable brands "to communicate directly with prospective consumers via video, blogs and social media," announced a press release from AOL.

Its first focus is a cross-platform package in conjunction with other AOL properties to promote Iceland as a year-round tourist destination. As the press release says, the 'Inspired by Iceland' campaign, sponsored by Promote Iceland and Iceland's government, is "the first Europe- wide marketing campaign that fully integrates a comprehensive suite of AOL advertising products, content and platforms."

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-27 11:02

Digital advertising spending is set to overtake print in the US. But a new study by PEW suggests that these new digital dollars aren't going into the pockets of news organisations.

The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism analysed the websites of 22 newspapers, TV networks and digital news publications like the Huffington Post, and concluded that "even the top news websites in the country have had little success getting advertisers from traditional platforms to move online."

Pew found that most news organizations are highly reliant on banner ads, and have failed to diversify into video or pop-up advertising or to target ads at specific users as Google and Facebook do.

The report initially found that of the 22 news organisations in the study, only three - CNN, The New York Times and Yahoo News - made "significant" use of targeted ads. A follow-up analysis six months later found that two more sites - the LA Times and The Atlantic - had increased their use of targeted ads, but the proportion of customised ads compared to blanket ads was still small.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-13 18:30

Have we reached a turning point in digital growth? Paid Content reported today that the London-based international media group Future PLC managed to offset the decline in its print revenues in the UK with a rise in digital earnings.

The company has just published its Interim Management Statement, analysing its performance between 1 October and 31 December 2011. In the UK, where Future PLC has 75% of its business, digital circulation and ad revenues increased by 51% - enough to make up for a decline in print revenue. The company sees this development as "an important milestone in the evolution of the business".

However, Future PLC also notes that in the UK revenues did decline by 2%, but states that this was "chiefly as a result of the loss of a customer publishing contract".

In the US, revenue fell by 20%, as the company "anticipated", due to shinking print revenues and the closure of some publications. However, digital revenues rose by 24%, and the company claims that the growth in this area, along with cost-cutting measures and the sale of some US properties, should allow it to become profitable in the US again by 2013.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-08 12:57

For news publishers, there's no doubt that the digital age has well and truly arrived. eMarketer published a report in January predicting that online advertising spending in the United States will overtake print this year.

Spending on online ads in the US grew by 23% last year, totaling $32.03 billion, estimates eMarketer. The company, which provides analysis of internet market trends based on its own assessment of ad selling companies' reported revenues as well as on data from other industry sources, predicts that online ad spending will grow another 23.3% this year, to reach $39.5 billion.

Meanwhile, US print advertising, which totaled an estimated $36 billion in 2011, is expected to drop to $33.8 billion.

eMarketer forecasts a significant rise in online ad spending over the next five years; it predicts that by the year 2016, online ad spending will total $62 billion in the United States, and that print spending will drop to $32.3 billion.

Compared to other industry analysts, eMarketer's predictions are high, yet all forecast a meaningful rise in online ad spending in the coming years.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-03 14:02

In mid December last year, 10% of adults in the US owned a tablet computer and 10% owned an ebook reader. According to a report published by PEW today, by early January this year both of these figures had jumped to 19%.

The same report estimated that the number of American adults who owned at least one tablet or eReader leapt from 18% in December to 29% in January.

Father Christmas's generosity seems likely to have a big impact on publishers. According to a poll by IDG Connect, 72% of 210 surveyed worldwide professionals say that they bought fewer newspapers after getting an iPad. According to the same research, as Paid Content reports, 70% of participants also said that they bought fewer books.

Although the sample data is small, the trends are obvious: tablet sales are booming, print is losing out.

The numbers are worrying for news organisations that still rely on print as their main source of revenue. The IDG Connect report notes that "for advertising- funded media (newspapers and magazines), the challenges are particularly substantial. Readers who can afford iPads tend to be more demographically desirable than those who cannot."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-23 17:58

A rough economic climate made 2011 a hard year in Britain, both for local business and for local newspapers. But perhaps a problem shared is a problem halved for the two industries, as the Newspaper Society has named the winners of its Local Business Accelerators scheme, which supports new business while promoting local newspaper advertising.

The scheme, launched last year, and described as a "special partnership between your local newspaper and selected businesses in your community", encouraged UK start-ups to apply for a chance to win a three month advertising campaign with their local paper, as well as mentoring from a business expert.

The initiative is backed by Deborah Meaden from Dragon's Den, who will mentor the overall national winner, to be chosen later this year.

The first round of roughly 1,500 winners, who will have their ads hosted by 500 participating local papers, was announced two days ago. The winning companies were congratulated on Twitter by British PM David Cameron, who also acknowledged the local papers that supported the scheme.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-13 15:04

by Rick Waghorn

Two quick stories to hopefully illustrate why I believe the salvation of local news in this country and beyond lies in reuniting Batman with Robin and once more pairing the local news reporter with his local advertising equivalent.

Earlier this autumn I served a request using the Freedom of Information Act on Norfolk County Council after it opted to collaborate with a well-known online advertising firm in Mountain View, California with regard to their online advertising provision.

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-18 09:08

When it comes to editorial practices, online and non-online platforms are increasingly given the same importance. Break the story online, give the analysis in print. That's the approach taken by many B2B magazines, newspapers and even TV news programmes. But commercially, is the gap between bits and bytes still too big and are predominately print-based publishers moving too slowly?

In a low-key announcement yesterday, Guardian News & Media says that as part of its "digital first" strategy it will consolidate print and online advertising systems into one ad selling platform.

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-17 10:57

Traditional Newspaper management is just like the old guard in Baseball. That's what you'll think after watching Moneyball starring Brad Pitt as Oakland A's general manager; Billy Beane.

Based on a true story, Moneyball shows Beane going up against his old school, know-it-all, front office. He's tired of being in last place and squeaking by on a shoe string budget. Unable to afford star players, Billy decides to slaughter a few sacred cows and installs experimental yet logical tactics into his game plan.

Continue reading on Mel Taylor Media

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-06 09:19

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