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Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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sfnblog.org Shaping the Future of the News Publishing

The government of Burma has taken a major step towards freedom of expression according to a report from The Associated Press and published on the Guardian's website. The country has stopped the practice of requiring reporters to submit their articles to state censors before they can be published.

Rachel McAthy on the journalism.co.uk website offers an interesting look at eight examples of long-form digital content projects.

Recovering Journalist Mark Potts highlights a vision for the future of newspaperwritten 20 years ago by Robert G. Kaiser, the then-newly appointed Managing Editor of The Washington Post, which as Potts points out, remains "a striking document, even today."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-20 18:19

A survey conducted by the Pew Research Centre for the People & the Press has revealed rising mistrust of the press in the USA. For the second time since 2002, public faith in the credibility of US news outlets has diminished: the ‘positive believability ratings’ for nine out of the thirteen news organisations included in the poll have experienced a sharp decline, recalling a similar downturn experienced between 2002 and 2004.

The survey covered both television and radio broadcasters and newspaper companies and asked 1001 people to rank the believability of individual news organisations on a 4-point scale. A rating of 4 meant that someone accepted “all or most of what the news organisations say” to be true and 1 indicates that an individual believed “almost nothing”. On average 56% of individuals who contributed to the study gave news titles, including USA Today and The Wall Street Journal, a rating of 3-4 points. This figure stood at 62% only two years ago, and demonstrates a considerable drop in public trust in the news media since 2002 when the average positive rating stood at 71%.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-20 17:30

Big data is 2012’s big buzzword, as many predicted it would be.

The catchy term does not simply denote vast amounts of information, but refers to the emerging technologies developed and employed to gather, process and analyse the tidal wave of new data. “Big Data is really about new uses and new insights, not so much the data itself,” says Rod A. Smith, IBM’s vice president for emerging Internet technologies, in an interview with The New York Times. Human beings have produced more data information in the last two years than at any other time in history: according to IBM’s calculations, 90% of the data currently in existence was created between 2010-2012, thanks to social media posts and interactions, online-browsing history, web-purchase receipts, GPS systems, and sensor and surveillance data. The revolutionary aspect of ‘Big Data’ lies in the way in which it forms links and associations between seemingly disparate facts, leading to new perspectives and revelations.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-20 10:50

The SFN blog is taking a summer holiday. We will begin posting again on Monday, 20 August.

During our break, you can keep up with industry news through WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-06 08:59

As Jim Romenesko notes, "This is incredible": In the US, the leadership of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists apparently changed their minds about live tweeting coverage of their open meeting and asked a reporter to leave the room.

The Australian Financial Review (AFR) will use up to two pages of content from the Financial Times under terms of a new content deal between the two publications, writes Emily Tullock on PANPA. AFR also now has 20,000 digital subscribers, Tullock notes.

US-based Gatehouse Media, which publishes 78 daily papers, announced this week that its digital revenue increased 32.3 percent over the previous year. However, total revenues for the second quarter were down 4.2 percent from the year before.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-03 17:02

After only five issues as a paid-for app, The Huffington Post’s tablet magazine Huffington will now be completely free to download.

The magazine was welcomed into the world with a rooftop party at the Gramercy Park Hotel in New York and presented as a premium content product; a single issue was priced at 99 cents and consumers could buy monthly and annual subscriptions for $1.99 and $19.99 respectively. Speaking to reporters after the magazine’s launch, Executive Editor Tim O’Brien explained the decision to charge for access to content, saying: "We feel it's a premium product and it deserves to carry a price with it in order to access all the value we're giving people."

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-03 16:11

The Washington Post announced on 1 August that it has launched a new platform for crowdsourcing. The Post describes “Crowd Sourced” as a "special feature that allows Post journalists to ask questions about today’s concerns and begin a conversation about these issues. Users will be able to answer those questions and vote for the ideas they value most, so the most popular responses are surfaced on the page."

new wave of news syndication is developing according to Ken Doctor in his latest newsonomics post on Nieman Journalism Lab. "It’s worth paying attention to, because it tells us a lot about how the digital news world is developing," he writes.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-02 17:22

Today the Centre for Investigative Journalism (CIR) has launched a new YouTube channel in the hope of generating ‘revenue that supports the work of nonprofit organizations and independent filmmakers everywhere’. To this end the Knight Foundation has donated $800,000 of funding to the project.

Dedicated to the diffusion of investigative news reporting, the I Files will be curated daily by the CIR and feature videos and playlists from the channel’s high profile media partners. Among the news outlets contributing content are the BBC, The New York Times, Al Jazeera and ABC News, as well as non-profit organisations including the Innovative Reporting Workshop and the Pulitzer Centre on Crisis Reporting. I Files will also feature footage from freelance video journalists and independent filmmakers from all over the world.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-02 14:23

Digital First is still putting together its Project Thunderdome team, but the initiative has hit the ground running with its coverage of the shootings in Aurora, Colorado, reports Adrienne LaFrance on Nieman Journalism Lab.

On PoynterCraig Silverman offers tips about when a young journalist's sloppy habits should be seen as a signal of something much worse.

Sarah Marshall on journalism.co.uk reports on "How 12 news outlets are innovating on Tumblr."

Twitter is a very hot topic this week, as is the Olympics, and Christopher Heine onAdWeek combines them to point out 5 Twitter surprises from the Olympics.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-01 17:15

The Daily, Rupert Murdoch’s first attempt at producing a digital-only newspaper, has announced that almost a third of its present employees are to be “released.” Rumours of its imminent demise have dogged the title since it was reportedly placed ‘on watch’ in July.

Of the 170 members of staff employed at The Daily, 50 will lose their jobs. The Sports and Opinion sections, which suffered from light traffic levels, will be particularly hit by the cuts as executives aim to reduce expenditure in underperforming departments. A memo sent to employees by Editor-in-Chief Jesse Angelo explained: “Sports reporting will now be provided by content partners, like Fox Sports […] The Daily will no longer have a standalone Opinion section. Opinion pieces and editorials will appear in the news pages, clearly marked, from time to time as appropriate.” Further efficiency measures include “locking the app in portrait mode,” meaning that digital pages will only be available in vertical layout, with no horizontal formatting option.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-01 14:10

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