Date

Wed - 29.03.2017


Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

SFN Blog

Header

sfnblog.org Shaping the Future of the News Publishing

Getting to grips with the speed of change brought about by the digital revolution is rarely easy for the news editors at the head of an industry that remained fundamentally unchanged and stable until relatively recently.

Take, for example, the case of news website homepages.

When the rise of the Internet demanded that newspapers engage with their readers through online editions, editors responded (some faster than others) with websites built around homepages that acted as a constantly updated front page. However, the digital world is characterised by relentless advancement and development, meaning that online news strategies frequently become out-dated.

Only a little over year ago the Pew Research Center issued its "Navigating News Online" report, in which the importance of the homepage came under scrutiny. Although users were increasingly finding their way directly to news articles through social media, the data amassed by the report suggested that “the front page of a Website is vital.” For 21 of the 25 news sites taken into account by the Center’s research, the homepage was the most viewed part of the site: at Reuters.com, the homepage attracted 79 percent of all traffic, and 69 percent at news.google.com.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-07 17:19

News websites in the US and the UK racked up record traffic numbers in August, traditionally a slow month, according to a report on Poynter.

Advertising revenues continued to decline for US newspapers in the second quarter of this year. Erik Sass of MediaDailyNews reports that the latest figures from the Newspaper Association of America show total ad revenues dropped 6.4 percent to $5.6 billion in the second quarter of 2012 from $6 billion in the second quarter of 2011. "Print ad revenues fell 7.9 percent from $5.2 billion to $4.8 billion, while online ad revenue growth remained anemic with a 2.9 percent increase from $803 million to $827 million," Sass writes.

Does the Los Angeles Times qualify as a charity case? asks veteran blogger Alan D. Mutter, who examines the paper's recent $1 million gift from the Ford Foundation.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-06 17:37

The Journal Register Company (JRC), whose extensive portfolio of local and regional U.S. news titles includes the New Haven Register and The Trentonian has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Parent company Digital First Media (DFM) confirmed the news on Wednesday and also revealed that it was to sell the company as soon as possible. It is hoped that an auction and sale will be finalised within the next 90 days and 21st CMH Acquisition Company, an affiliate of the Alden Global Capital hedge fund that owns the JRC, has already signed "a stalking horse bid" for the company

Under the direction of DFM’s CEO, John Paton, the Journal Register Company has been steadily making a name for itself as one of the leading innovators of the U.S. news industry. Paton’s firmly held conviction that the future will see print newspapers give way to digital models has seen JRC’s investment in digital ventures rise during his tenure. Since 2009 digital expenses at the company have risen by 151 percent, at a time when general expenditure was greatly reduced.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-06 17:17

"The Knight Foundation announced $3.67 million in matching funds today that will support 20 local news and information projects," reports Jeff Sonderman on Poynter.

"Today Digital First Media announced Journal Register Company has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and will seek to implement a prompt sale," writes Digital First Media CEO John Paton in a post on his blog.

In the UK, the Leveson Inquiry report is now expected to be delivered in November rather than October, according to a story by Lisa O'Carroll on the Guardian.

Mathew Ingram of GigaOM offers advice on "What newspapers and other media could learn from Reddit."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-05 17:51

In an impressive display of unity, French publishers have come together for a joint venture designed to improve online advertising revenue for some of France’s biggest media companies.

Back in March, FigaroMédias, Amaury Media Group (whose publications include Le Parisien and L’Equipe), Lagardère (Paris Match and Elle) and TF1 began constructing La Place Media, a premium publisher exchange group. After running in beta for the past month, the platform was officially launched on 4 September and has managed to attract other major publishers, including Marie-Claire, which collectively have 28 million unique users and generate 4 billion unique page views per month.

Supported by digital advertising infrastructure company Rubicon Project’s REVV platform, La Place Media can be accessed by any one of the 70,000 ad buyers connected to Rubicon’s network. Each of the participating publishers share audience data information with LPM’s centralised system, which allows advertisers to select the website whose audience best corresponds to particular advertisements – resulting in better targeted and therefore more effective ad campaigns.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-05 16:45

France’s Union of the National Daily Press (SPQN) is taking a keen interest in a draft law, approved by Germany’s cabinet last week, which would require aggregators such as Google News that reproduce snippets of text from news articles to pay a copyright fee to publishers, reported Le Monde on Tuesday.

The German draft law, backed by major publishing houses Axel Springer and Bertelsmann, has been nicknamed the “Lex Google” in France. Initially put forth by the Federation of German News Publishers, its intention is to allow publishers to recover some of the advertising revenue that they say is lost to aggregators who reproduce “pirated” content from news organizations’ websites as teasers on their news pages.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-05 12:16

In the UK, Telegraph Media Group says it "plans to bolster its video content online – including supplying journalists with a 'backpack device' to stream content," writesAndrew Pugh for Press Gazette.

On PoynterCraig Silverman examines "How National Geographic Travelerexposes problematic entries in its photo contest."

The Washington Post's new desktop app, The Issue Engineaimed at boosting reader engagement, gets reviewed by Michael Depp on theNetNewsCheck website.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-04 17:37

"With digital information so vulnerable to theft, it’s imperative for journalists to be proactive in protecting confidential sources and data. But too few people are taking the threat seriously," according to a report on the American Journalism Reviewwebsite by Sherry Ricchiardi.

Former News of the World Editor Rebekah Brooks appeared briefly in court today in relation to alleged phone hacking. The Guardian reports that "Brooks, 44, appeared alone in the dock to hear bail conditions banning her from contacting six co-defendants, and to give police seven days notice of any foreign travel." Her next court appearance is scheduled for 26 September.

Veteran journalist, editor and blogger Steve Yelvington answers the question "Where does local media site traffic come from, anyway?"

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-03 17:41

That is the message global media consultants Simon-Kucher & Partners is hoping to send to news publishers, with a report that makes the case for significant increases in newspaper cover prices.

Price hikes are frequently seen as tangible proof of a newspaper’s declining fortunes, a desperate attempt on editors’ parts to combat dwindling revenue. Take for example Jeff Jarvis’s reaction to the NYTimes’s decision to raise the price of its print edition by 25 percent, from $2 per copy to $2.50. Jarvis doubted the viability of such a move, believing that it aimed to “support an outmoded economic model.” Newspapers, he argued, have lost much of their pricing power as online content puts paid to the advertising models that once made newspapers a powerful economic force. Jarvis’s reflections on the impact digital has had on newspaper ad revenue is valid in the main, but his assertion that increasing cover prices is an exercise in futility finds a counter-argument in SKP’s recent study.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-03 16:07

The Washington Post says that U.S. freelance journalist Austin Tice, who had not been heard from for over two weeks, "has been captured and is being held in Syrian government custody."

Patrick Thornton on Poynter reports on "How news organizations are taking advantage of the latest iPad’s features."

Twitter has announced "it will allow advertisers to more easily target their Twitter ad messages to people based on their interests," according to a story in The Wall Street Journal.

Laura Hazard Owen on the paidContent website writes that the Minneapolis Star Tribune’s ebook experiment is paying off.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-31 18:05

Syndicate content

Advertisement

SFN Blog

Shaping the Future of the News Publishing

Advertisement


© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation