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Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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sfnblog.org Shaping the Future of the News Publishing

The New York Times Company’s share price experienced its furthest one-day drop in three years today after the company released third quarter results that showed an 85 percent decline in net income on the period a year earlier.

While analysts had predicted an average third quarter profit of 8 cents a share, the company reported a loss from continuing operations (excluding severance and other costs) of 1 cent a share.

During the quarterly earnings call today, Twitter users noted under the $NYT symbol that the company’s share price had fallen by 11, 13, and then 17 percent. (The decline stood at 14.6 percent at time of publication. View current price here).

On the call, Chairman and Interim CEO Arthur Sulzberger Jr. listed video, mobile and international expansion among growth areas for the company, and spoke of its engagement with Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google +, its new presence on Flipboard, and its experimental HTML 5 app for the iPad as crucial elements in its strategy.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-25 17:54

Today, Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to show the world the iPad’s mini me, following (as ever) months of hypothesising and (for once) the competition: Amazon and Google have already achieved success in the tiny tablet market with their Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 devices.

The Apple keynote will take place at 10 am PST in San José, California. “We have a little more to show you,” read the invitations, sent one week ago, seemingly substantiating the speculation that has been ricocheting across the web at least since February, when “the first credible rumour” of a mini iPad came from the Wall Street Journal. Taking place at the California Theatre, the unveiling event will likely be modest relative to Microsoft’s “no-expenses-spared” launch of its Surface tablet in New York, scheduled for Thursday, October 25.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-23 15:53

Flash quiz: what is the highest-circulation English-language newspaper in the world?

(Hint: Rupert Murdoch doesn’t own it.)

The correct answer, as you are likely aware, is the Times of India, which has a circulation of 4.3 million, and reaches an average of 7.64 million readers with each issue.

While money may not exactly be growing on trees in the news industry these days, the 174-year-old title, published by family-owned media conglomerate Bennett, Coleman & Company (B.C.C.L.), is planted in fertile soil: it is the most widely read English-language daily in a country where newspaper circulation is rising by 8 percent per year overall, and 1.5 percent per year for English-language newspapers.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-22 17:34

The New York Times is planning to further extend its international reach and tap into the promising Brazilian advertising market by launching a Portuguese-language website in the second half of next year.

The revelation follows a similar move by the Financial Times, which opened a newspaper printing plant in São Paulo earlier this month, and is taking strides to expand its Latin American web presence with a tailored homepage and mobile app.

Also rooted in São Paulo, The Times’ new site will feature approximately ten daily regional news stories reported and edited by local staff, and 20 or so articles translated from NYTimes.com. But the Portuguese-language content will not be paywall-protected (at least in the beginning); its revenue will depend entirely on advertising.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-16 23:57

On Wednesday, the WAN-IFRA New Media, New Challenges, New Business study tour visited The Boston Globe to learn about its innovative approach to paid content.

Jeff Moriarty, Vice President Digital Products, told the group about the new two-website strategy, launched a year ago. Since 1996, the publisher had been running the free Boston.com website, focused on lifestyle, sport and living in and around Boston. At the end of 2010, Forrester was brought in to help identify different user segments, and found three clear groups: print engaged users, who essentially like the print format and experience and are willing to pay, online/mobile engaged users, who dip in and out, like to curate their own content, and have some willingness to pay, and finally casual users who have no willingness to pay.

Author

Guest

Date

2012-10-12 17:02

Business Insider is planning to host more content sponsored by advertisers, including slide shows, videos, and possibly even branded blogs, reports Jason Del Ray for AdAge.

Pete Spande, who was appointed Business Insider’s first Chief Revenue Officer in March, is leading the initiative, known as “Brand Insider,” which he says will allow companies to place content that they have already created but that may be languishing in some quiet corner of the web beside the site's editorial content, and get it noticed by Business Insider's growing base of share-happy users.

“We're able to give brands the spotlight to get that content seen by a large audience,” Spande tells AdAge.

Business Insider’s Chief Operational Officer Julie Hansen senses good revenue prospects in sponsored content, and hopes that “in a couple year’s time” it will make up half of the site’s total revenue. “That would be great,” she said.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-11 15:23

Only a few days after Presstalis, France’s main newspaper distributor, narrowly escaped bankruptcy, its workers have yet again gone on strike, this time blocking all of the country’s national titles dated Wednesday, October 10 from reaching newsstands.

The Union for Books and Written Communication (SGLCE-CGT) called for Presstalis employees to stop working for 24 hours to protest against a restructuring plan, deemed “unavoidable” by Presstalis management, that is expected to involve cutting 1,250 of the company’s 2,500 jobs.

France’s distribution industry has been hit hard by an estimated 25 percent decline in kiosk sales over the last four years. Presstalis, which is in charge of delivering three quarters of France’s national press including all of the national daily newspapers, is expected to lose between 15 and 20 million Euros this year.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-10 12:09

Through gloomy economic conditions shines a rare glimmer of British sun: spending on Internet and mobile advertising in the UK rose to a record six-month high in the first half of this year to reach nearly £2.6 billion.

This represents a 12.6 percent increase from the first half of 2011, during which £2.3 billion was spent on Internet and mobile advertising.

These figures come from the latest Internet Advertising Bureau UK (IAB) Expenditure Report, published today, which is based on a survey conducted by Pricewaterhouse Coopers measuring like-for-like, year-on-year growth.*

Other key findings include:

  • Mobile ad spend more than doubled
  • Paid search advertising dominates digital ad spend across platforms
  • Online video advertising increased by nearly half

Mobile advertising

Spending on mobile advertising has continued what the report refers to as its “meteoric rise,” soaring 132 percent to £181.5 million. As we reported in March, mobile ad spend grew 157 percent from 2010 to 2011, according to IAB.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-09 16:08

Concentration and Politics Hinder Israel Newspapers, The New York Times

As one of Israel’s mainstream newspapers (Maariv) appears on the verge of closing, and another (Haaretz) faces strikes protesting its plans to lay off employees, The New York Times looked at the crisis in the country’s print media. The market has been skewed by the free national daily, Israel Hayom, introduced five years ago by a pro-government American billionaire, but the article provides an interesting summary of some of the challenges encountered by media in small-language markets.

Newspaper journalism is in crisis, The Guardian

“I loved the idea that, while I walked and talked and learned who I was, while I grew and even while I slept, great journalists were establishing the first draft of history,” writes John Tiffany in this fervent tale of his relationship with newspapers over the years. Tiffany, associate director of the National Theatre of Scotland, has put together a play, Enquirer, which aims to address the question “Are we seeing the dying days of the newspaper industry?”

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-08 18:03

The management of leading Spanish newspaper El País announced to staff on Friday a plan to lay off about 150 employees – or one third of staff – as part of a series of cutbacks to “guarantee the viability of the business in years to come.”

Other measures will include early retirement plans and salary cuts, announced Juan Luis Cebrián, President of the PRISA group and of El País, accompanied by directors of both the publishing group and the newspaper.

The managers called the cutbacks “painful” yet “inevitable,” citing a steep drop in revenue stemming from the contraction of the advertising market and reduced circulation. In the Spanish market, print advertising revenue has dropped by 53 percent and newspaper circulation by 18 percent over the last five years, directors told staff members.

“For every dollar that is made on the Internet, ten are destroyed in print,” said Cebrián. “It’s not a question of wanting to improve profitability. The newspaper can no longer support its current cost structure.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-08 17:42

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